News / USA

    NRA Wants Armed Police in US Schools

    The National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, gestures during a news conference in response to the Connecticut school shooting, Washington, December 21, 2012.
    The National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, gestures during a news conference in response to the Connecticut school shooting, Washington, December 21, 2012.
    VOA News
    The United States' largest gun rights lobby says it wants to address gun violence by placing armed police officers in every school in America, while two Democratic senators called the group's response to the Newtown tragedy shamefully inadequate.

    The executive vice president of the powerful National Rifle Association, or NRA, said tragedies like the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, last week could be prevented by armed security, adding that "the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun." 

    The NRA's Wayne LaPierre spoke Friday in Washington, one week after 26 people were gunned down at the school.  He also blamed movies and video games for exposing U.S. children to a violent culture.

    Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.
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    Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.
    Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.
    The NRA news conference was disrupted twice by protesters who blamed the group for gun violence.  One protester held up a banner to the cameras that said, "NRA killing our kids."

    Two Democratic senators responded to the NRA statement by labeling it a delay tactic aimed at stalling a real conversation about gun control.

    Senator Dianne Feinstein of California has said she will introduce legislation on reauthorizing an assault weapons ban.

    "We cannot ignore the common denominator in all of these deadly massacres - access, easy access to killing machines," she said.

    Senator Richard Blumenthal, who represents Connecticut, called the NRA statement "shamefully inadequate." 

    "The refrain I have heard again and again and again from the people of Newtown and Connecticut and all around the country is, 'you need to do something about the guns," he said.

    Story continues below

    • Members of the Rutter family embrace early Christmas morning as they stand near memorials by the Sandy Hook firehouse in Newtown, Connecticut, December 25, 2012.
    • A man touches the snow covered grave of six-year-old Ana Grace Marquez-Greene, one of 20 schoolchildren killed in the December 14 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, at the Newtown Village Cemetery, Connecticut, December 25, 2012.
    • Officials including Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy observe a moment of silence on the steps of Edmond Town Hall while bells ring 26 times in Newtown, Connecticut, December 21, 2012.
    • Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy, center, stands with other officials to observe a moment of silence in Newtown, December 21, 2012.
    • Ben Toby of Sandy Hook visits a memorial to the Newtown shooting victims during a heavy rain in the Sandy Hook village of Newtown, Connecticut, December 21, 2012.
    • Jeanne Walker walks through an overflowing memorial to the shooting victims, Newtown, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • A portrait of Benjamin Andrew Wheeler, one of the students killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, stands outside of Trinity Episcopal Church before his funeral service, Newton, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • Boy Scouts of America carry flags as they walk toward Trinity Episcopal Church before funeral services for Benjamin Andrew Wheeler, Newton, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • A long line stretches down the block in front of the First Congregational Church before a memorial service for Lauren Rousseau in Danbury, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • A police officer stands outside as a service begins for teacher Anne Marie Murphy at the St. Mary Of The Assumption Church in Katonah, New York, December 20, 2012.
    • Firefighters salute as a hearse passes for the funeral procession to the burial of 7-year-old Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victim Daniel Gerard Barden, Newtown, Connecticut, December 19, 2012.

    Earlier, President Barack Obama and other Americans paused to remember those killed a week ago.  Church bells rang in Newtown and other U.S. towns and cities as mourners stood in silence.

    The December 14 attack at Sandy Hook Elementary was the second-worst school shooting in U.S. history.

    After the attack, President Obama said action is needed to prevent such a tragedy in the future.  He has called on Congress to reinstate the assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004.  The gunman in the Newtown attack used a military-style weapon.

    The worst U.S. school shooting occurred in 2007, when a gunman opened fire at a Virginia university, killing 32 people before taking his own life.

    Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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    Comments page of 4
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    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    December 23, 2012 4:00 AM
    I think it's a foregone issue. Just ban using guns and just confiscate all guns from all cutizens.

    by: Old Timer
    December 22, 2012 8:21 PM
    A comprehensive national gun law policy is required as soon as possible with the introduction of a computerized data base against which all firearms applicants fingerprints can be checked,
    in the waiting/licence process. Once approved a fireams licence card with the applicants name and firearm details, along with a fingerprint and a reference number including a photograph of the holder. Gun locks for firearms must form part of the requirement along with a safe.

    by: James from: Nebraska
    December 22, 2012 6:17 PM
    Yes, let's make schools like airports, since we love how we've made airports like airports.
    And we don't even need stand up a vast new agency to run school security, just expand the mandate of TSA,
    What about using every other civilised Western democracy's method (lose the gun culture)? Or are we incapable? No wonder few nations want to emulate us.

    by: justiceisserved from: seattle
    December 22, 2012 1:58 PM
    How many older white Wasp women in Connecticut own a Bushmaster Assault Rifle? Hmm? Why is no one asking this question?

    by: Bobbi Vee from: Oregon
    December 22, 2012 12:22 PM
    NRA is not killing our kids.(NRA does not sell guns) But what a already used excuses for the causes. More creative would be...the medicines given to kids for the use of controlling their behavior, everyone knows about over medicated kids and adults. Oh and who allowed the American public the oppurtunity to buy these powerful semi automatic weapons in the first place??? THINK a little harder NRA. (San Ysidro, Ca. massaccre happened in 1984).

    by: Maria Guthrie from: Australia
    December 22, 2012 5:56 AM
    It is hard to believe that you recommend armed guards in schools, the schools will just turn into wild west shout outs. I hear you say you have the right to bear arms, it is my view that that is out weighed by the right of innocent people and children to feel safe in their homes and schools. The American attitude towards guns is hard to understand, it is unreal.

    by: ronald hullet from: hot springs ar
    December 21, 2012 8:13 PM
    RainyDayInterns beat me to the punch with this idea. I'm trying
    to do the math, but that's going to require a bit of guesswork. Let's see, matybe a million schools in the U.S.? With an average
    of what, appx 50 classrooms? 50,000,000? Each cop costing a-
    round $400 a day? That's $20 billion? (please check my figures
    as I wasn't a math major). And would that be multiplied by 260?
    (52 weeks by 5 days per). Yo, Mr. LaPierre - that's a lot of dollar
    bills you'd have to come up with. Where are you going to find
    those funds - you certainly don't expect the average stiff to fit that
    bill, do you? You are past insane, buddy.

    by: RainyDayInterns from: Boston
    December 21, 2012 7:09 PM
    Lets tax the guns, bullets, and permits at the rates necessary to implement the NRA suggestion.

    If the NRA folks want their guns, lets make them pay for keeping everyone else safe from them.

    by: Rob from: UK
    December 21, 2012 7:05 PM
    You call yourself a developed nation, yet you are so out of control you have officially considered putting armed guards in children's schools?

    If you had any idea how stupid and shocking this sounds to European ears... (even to Eastern ears, for that matter).

    I do hope you're all taking this extremely seriously; for your own sake.

    by: geoff1948 from: norfolk uk
    December 21, 2012 6:17 PM
    so as far as the NRA are concerned the answer to gun crime is more guns,unbelievable, in the UK we have six guns per hundred people I think USA has ninety six per hundred does that not tell you anything.
    In Response

    by: Tommy124 from: MA
    December 21, 2012 7:10 PM
    I wonder if it is a coincidence? The NRA suggests a solution to the problem of people being murdered in schools, which involves selling more guns.
    Makes you wonder how these look in the mirror, or pray, doesn't it?
    Do they never look at their kids, and think, "There but for the grace of God go I"?
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