News / USA

    NRA Wants Armed Police in US Schools

    The National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, gestures during a news conference in response to the Connecticut school shooting, Washington, December 21, 2012.
    The National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, gestures during a news conference in response to the Connecticut school shooting, Washington, December 21, 2012.
    VOA News
    The United States' largest gun rights lobby says it wants to address gun violence by placing armed police officers in every school in America, while two Democratic senators called the group's response to the Newtown tragedy shamefully inadequate.

    The executive vice president of the powerful National Rifle Association, or NRA, said tragedies like the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, last week could be prevented by armed security, adding that "the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun." 

    The NRA's Wayne LaPierre spoke Friday in Washington, one week after 26 people were gunned down at the school.  He also blamed movies and video games for exposing U.S. children to a violent culture.

    Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.
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    Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.
    Activist Medea Benjamin, of Code Pink, is led away by security as she protests during a statement by National Rifle Association executive vice president Wayne LaPierre, left, during a news conference in Washington, December 21, 2012.
    The NRA news conference was disrupted twice by protesters who blamed the group for gun violence.  One protester held up a banner to the cameras that said, "NRA killing our kids."

    Two Democratic senators responded to the NRA statement by labeling it a delay tactic aimed at stalling a real conversation about gun control.

    Senator Dianne Feinstein of California has said she will introduce legislation on reauthorizing an assault weapons ban.

    "We cannot ignore the common denominator in all of these deadly massacres - access, easy access to killing machines," she said.

    Senator Richard Blumenthal, who represents Connecticut, called the NRA statement "shamefully inadequate." 

    "The refrain I have heard again and again and again from the people of Newtown and Connecticut and all around the country is, 'you need to do something about the guns," he said.

    Story continues below

    • Members of the Rutter family embrace early Christmas morning as they stand near memorials by the Sandy Hook firehouse in Newtown, Connecticut, December 25, 2012.
    • A man touches the snow covered grave of six-year-old Ana Grace Marquez-Greene, one of 20 schoolchildren killed in the December 14 shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, at the Newtown Village Cemetery, Connecticut, December 25, 2012.
    • Officials including Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy observe a moment of silence on the steps of Edmond Town Hall while bells ring 26 times in Newtown, Connecticut, December 21, 2012.
    • Connecticut Governor Dan Malloy, center, stands with other officials to observe a moment of silence in Newtown, December 21, 2012.
    • Ben Toby of Sandy Hook visits a memorial to the Newtown shooting victims during a heavy rain in the Sandy Hook village of Newtown, Connecticut, December 21, 2012.
    • Jeanne Walker walks through an overflowing memorial to the shooting victims, Newtown, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • A portrait of Benjamin Andrew Wheeler, one of the students killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, stands outside of Trinity Episcopal Church before his funeral service, Newton, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • Boy Scouts of America carry flags as they walk toward Trinity Episcopal Church before funeral services for Benjamin Andrew Wheeler, Newton, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • A long line stretches down the block in front of the First Congregational Church before a memorial service for Lauren Rousseau in Danbury, Connecticut, December 20, 2012.
    • A police officer stands outside as a service begins for teacher Anne Marie Murphy at the St. Mary Of The Assumption Church in Katonah, New York, December 20, 2012.
    • Firefighters salute as a hearse passes for the funeral procession to the burial of 7-year-old Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting victim Daniel Gerard Barden, Newtown, Connecticut, December 19, 2012.

    Earlier, President Barack Obama and other Americans paused to remember those killed a week ago.  Church bells rang in Newtown and other U.S. towns and cities as mourners stood in silence.

    The December 14 attack at Sandy Hook Elementary was the second-worst school shooting in U.S. history.

    After the attack, President Obama said action is needed to prevent such a tragedy in the future.  He has called on Congress to reinstate the assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004.  The gunman in the Newtown attack used a military-style weapon.

    The worst U.S. school shooting occurred in 2007, when a gunman opened fire at a Virginia university, killing 32 people before taking his own life.

    Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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    Comments page of 4
     Previous   Next 
    by: optaboy from: Australia
    December 21, 2012 6:13 PM
    There will always be nutjobs in the world but if every citizen is armed then every nutjob in the world is also armed....think about it.
    In Response

    by: Willy from: Mpls
    December 22, 2012 5:17 PM
    Sure, a good guy (with guns) can only be good until he goes crazy and shoots to kill. It's a fine line, ya know.

    by: rgw46 from: usa
    December 21, 2012 6:10 PM
    take -- ban all weapons--then I know where I can make a fortune ,selling them out of my trunk..like they do in LA,,,DAH

    by: Terry Davies from: Perth, Western Australia
    December 21, 2012 6:04 PM
    I admire Americans very much, but sometimes you must listen to friends! I know the 2nd amendment refers to muskets, not automatic or semi-automatic weapons! There is no need for them in a civilised society. From an outsider and what we see is "Nothing is going to happen." Therfore it looks like Americans love their weapons more than their own children." It will happen again, there will be more talk but you won't walk the walk and ban them.

    by: nk from: usa
    December 21, 2012 6:00 PM
    so were supposed to believe that by putting some moron rent a cop with a pistol in charge of guarding a school, its supposed to make the learning enviornment for our kids safer. now because of this stupid decesion, millions more tax payer dollars will be washed down the drain and contribute more and more to the downfall of this countries already failing economy. U want to stop this problem?? the solution is simple!!.... Why r we letting these people with mental illnesses simply roam the streets like they're regular people when we know (4 major school massacres later) that they are not. The problem is not gun control, it is these people that we should be controling.
    In Response

    by: Dangerous_Dave
    December 21, 2012 6:49 PM
    You seriously believe your selfish nation is going to spend money on mental health care, when they won't even provide basic physical health care for free?

    Current US policy on the mentally ill is to leave them to rot, and if they go seriously nutso and kill other people rather than just themselves, call them evil and execute them. Does that sound familiar? It's much cheaper that way, although obviously a lot of people get their lives ruined/ended. But that doesn't matter as long as the people in the gun industry keep their jobs and the gun company owners get even richer, and the inadequate people get to tote their big ole guns around, eh?

    by: bd from: Canada
    December 21, 2012 5:49 PM
    First, take semi-automatic assault weapons and large multi-round amo clips and strips off the market. Prohibit further sale and private possession.

    Next, do with firearms what has been done with tobacco. Incremental increases in taxes, incrementally limit availability, limit advertising, and educate younger citizens.

    In limiting advertising, regulate depiction of gun violence and the glorification of gun violence in media. Just as you cannot depict somebody smoking tobacco or depict graphic sexuality in a children's show, so should you regulate the depiction of gun violence in the media.

    A criminal back ground on every buyer with the finger prints and DNA.

    Rigorous testing and rigorous training for the purchase, use and safe storage of weapons.

    by: Alex from: Canada
    December 21, 2012 5:44 PM
    Great idea. An armed guard. Maybe we can have a shoot out in the school gymnasium
    .

    by: Farn Far
    December 21, 2012 5:42 PM
    You have to ask yourself what does the NRA really want? The root of the problem is that there is a big gun industry that profits a great deal by arming people. So, to arm the teachers and everyone else would add to the customer base and increase their profit even more!

    by: Willy from: Mpls
    December 21, 2012 5:28 PM
    Just when I thought it could not get worse than what happened in Newtown, and then this happens. You must be out of your mind, NRA. You know at the end of the day, only innocent people and children of America will take the loss. We must not let these madmen running our world, which is already gone insane. Stop the Madness!

    by: Darryl from: Earth
    December 21, 2012 4:07 PM
    Hmmm. Armed guards at every school, maybe a SWAT team should be posted at every college or university too. Blaming it all on mental illness, Sorry NRA that suggestion is plain stupid. There is no reason for any person to own an assault weapon at all! Wake up America, your children are being murdered. While most NRA members I am sure are just fine, what do you do about the extremists who are for want of a better word, "insane" There has to be some form of control. Remember the gun used was "mommy dearests"

    by: Rodger from: United kingdom
    December 21, 2012 4:03 PM
    The most amazing country in the world, foiled by gun law.
    My thoughts go to those poor parents a week after the shootings. As a Father of two who only sees his kids three times a year I can not begin to imagine
    Comments page of 4
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