News

Counseling and Education Goes Hand in Hand for Frostburg State University Student Nebojsa Zimonjic

Related Articles

Multimedia

Audio

Nebojsa Zimonjic is studying Counseling Psychology at Frostburg State University in Frostburg, Maryland thanks to a friend who suggested the university.His master's program is for three years and this is his first year.“When I got my AA (Associate of Arts) degree I transferred to the UMBC which is University of Maryland Baltimore County and I have worked for one year and I decided to come to Frostburg,” he says.

“I had a friend that lived close by who suggested for me to come to Frostburg, besides I have looked into several Counseling Psychology schools and I really liked Frostburg the most.It would get me out of my comfort zone, which I was use to and I function most productively when I get out of my comfort zone.Then secondly it is not to large, not to small community so that is what I really do like it is very similar to my school where I got my undergrad from UMBC.”

Nebojsa has an Associate of Arts degree in Education and a degree from University of Maryland Baltimore County. Turning his interest to Psychology happened when he had an opportunity to work in the field first.“I find Psychology and Education to be pretty related.After I finished my undergrad I got a job working for a non profit organization called Prolog Incorporated and they primarily help people with mental illness so I really got a taste of some hands on Psychology and that was my biggest reason I decided to go for Counseling Psychology.”

Home for Nebojsa is very far away.He tells us where he is from. “I am from Republic of Serbia which is a former Republic of Yugoslavia.Yugoslavia was at the time when I was born was made out of six republics and after Bosnian war it remained as Yugoslavia, but only with two republics including Serbia and Montenegro,” he says.

“Round year of 2002, it split so my country became just a Republic of Serbia.”

Nebojsa will tell you that going to college can be expensive.He as well as many students find ways to help defray the cost.“I’m actually on a graduate assistantship level which is called International Fellowship. I’m working for the school in the Psychology department.I’m a research assistant and that is what is helping me out with my tuition.”

When it comes to educational differences, Nebojsa says he appreciates the education system here in the states versus back home.“My country primarily focuses all on oral examinations so that was one of the easier aspects of me trying to accommodate this type of assessment.The problem that I found sometimes myself sometimes friends of mine whenever you do get examined orally you would get a grade from one to five, one would be the lowest and five the highest and you get a chance to get examined about two to five times throughout the semester,” he says.

“Sometimes you do have written exams and all of these grades they get averaged, so it is a very tough way of grading and remaining your GPA (Grade Point Average).So that is really, really difficult way of examination and at the same time there is a lot of corruption and in my country as far as I guess in all aspects including education.”

Following graduation, Nebojsa says he would like to stay in the United States.“I see myself graduating in 2011 and I would like to find a job in my profession and work primarily towards citizenship of the United States or becoming a permanent resident.”

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Feature Story

VIDEO: VOA's Brian Padden reports why activists say holding Mong Kok is key to the success of their movement, despite confrontations with angry residents, anti-protest groups and police.

Video Hong Kong Protesters Focus on Holding Volatile Mong Kok

Activists say holding Mong Kok is key to their movement's success, despite confrontations with angry residents and police More

Special Reports