News / Asia

    Australia Slams Russia's ‘Retaliatory’ Sanctions

    FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014. FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014.
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    FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014.
    FILE - Australia's Foreign Minister Julie Bishop talks to journalists during a news briefing in Kyiv, July 28, 2014.
    Phil Mercer

    Australia has issued a stern statement following Russia’s decision to impose sanctions on a range of western countries.

    In Canberra, Foreign Minister Julie Bishop called it “disappointing” that Russia has not addressed international concerns over its support of rebels in eastern Ukraine and its annexation of Crimea.

    Moscow’s sanctions on agricultural products are targeting mainly the United States and the European Union, but the punitive measures also affect other nations, including Australia, Canada and Norway.
     
    Canberra has previously imposed a range of sanctions against Russia over its support of pro-Russian separatists in the conflict in Ukraine. Among them is a travel ban.  Now Moscow has responded with trade sanctions that will last a year.
     
    In a statement, Australia’s foreign minister, Julie Bishop, said it was “disappointing” that Russia had imposed sanctions, rather than take decisive action to stop the supply of heavy weapons to separatists, including missile systems “believed to have been used in the downing of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17.”
     
    Australia Agriculture Minister Barnaby Joyce says the government will do what it can to minimize the impact of trade restrictions on farmers.  “The Australian people have a right to make a statement about what they see as an action that is wrong. And Mr. Medvedev has a different view and that's his right and he has a responsibility to the Russian people. And we have a responsibility to the Australian people.  And I know that this is something that is going to cause a bit of hardship in the country for rural producers but we will try our very best to work around it and find alternate markets,” she stated.
     
    Australia exports more than $370 million in agricultural products to Russia each year, including beef, butter and live animals.
     
    Overall, two-way trade between Australia and Russia in 2013 was worth about $1.65 billion.
     
    In a fiery news conference Friday, Australia Prime Minister Tony Abbott accused Russia of trying to bully Ukraine.  Mr. Abbott said if President Vladimir Putin wanted to be regarded as a world leader “instead of an international outcast” he had to order his forces not to intervene in the Ukrainian conflict.
     
    The prime minister also said that Australia is considering strengthening its own sanctions against Russia.

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    Comments page of 2
     Previous    
    by: chester from: Canada
    August 08, 2014 4:03 PM
    Stop whining! If you can do it to Russia why can't they do it to you?
    This kind of propaganda doesn't pass the smell test!
    In Response

    by: Monty from: Jacksonville
    August 09, 2014 5:33 PM
    Russia's convictions are for a Soviet era status. A status with little rights seeing as how they are making more and more rules with the internet and being aggressive with those that speak out.

    Russia doesn't care for freedom. They don't care for rights. Russia wants to have it both ways. They are a threat to world peace. Sorry but I think most countries have closer agendas with the US. The principles of Western countries are more mature than Russia that acts like a bully that tries to punishes those that punishes them when they are those being bad in the first place.

    Russia doesn't deserve to be a part of the UN. You might as well make North Korea a part. Russia has always played their veto vote as a prop against the West. Always.
    In Response

    by: Czechabroad from: CA
    August 08, 2014 6:11 PM
    Sergei Lavrov couple of days ago: "Russia will not retaliate with sanctions of its own or fall into hysterics. To fall into hysterics and respond to a blow with a blow is not worthy of a major country."

    I guess because Russia pretends to be a major country...
    In Response

    by: dude from: Perth
    August 08, 2014 5:34 PM
    all in all it seems that the Russian embargo is a measured response of a country which has a consistent foreign policy based on strong convictions, unlike the weaker countries such as Australia and Canada blindly follow orders from the US, don't you agree

    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    August 08, 2014 2:04 PM
    Garbage, garbage, garbage. Australia blames Russia while at the same time thinking of including its own sanctions. So what did Australia want Russia to do, fold hands and watch the barrage of sanctions land on its shores without a response? That's a fallacy. Nobody gave Obama a permission to do what USA is doing in Iraq today. In a way, some people still think it is wrong to strike ISIS, isn't it? Likewise, you Australians and Europe think Russia was wrong in taking its own Crimea, but is your opinion world opinion? If it were, it would be decided at the UN floor, but it wasn't, was it? All in all, the gainer, the one to reap its fall out and benefits is China. Fortunately or unfortunately, China can produce certain goods and services that the West needs, but China cannot absorb all the goods and services that Russia sources from the West despite its larger population. At the end it is China producing more of what is needed to replace Russia's deficit, but China will not buy as much from all these as Russia would buy. And talking about proximity to China's market, does Russia have an advantage over Europe or vice versa? Will this give a leap in growth to China's GDP for the period? I guess so, marginally though.
    In Response

    by: Ade
    August 09, 2014 7:11 AM
    It is quite depressing reading such a comment in this platform from a citizen of my country.
    In Response

    by: Abram from: USA
    August 09, 2014 2:43 AM
    Perhaps it will be better if we start responding to raised issues with reason and without the name-calling.
    In Response

    by: Irina from: Omsk
    August 09, 2014 2:10 AM
    Are you sure that Russia is selling and providing weapons to those people who are killing innocent people?!? ...well, sorry, but you are a crazy person!Russia wants the peace in Ukraine!!!!But Washington and EU don't give a damn about anything!!! And as for bombing Islamic Extremists by US in Northern Iraq it is a stupid excuse to seize oil !!!!Ukraine and its "friends" who are real criminal accessories to genocide against the Russian people.
    In Response

    by: will from: 1040W
    August 08, 2014 7:25 PM
    Are you a militant of those ISIS murderers to act in a way like you are and advocate for them?......if this situation was taking place in your country.....and it looks like it is really happening now......would you plead to your congress or to the world to "please help, please help" to stop the genocide, like that courageous woman did?......would you care where the help would come from especially if the big and powerful countries, russia for one, did not give a damn especially if they are selling and providing weapons to those people who are killing merciless innocent people and violating the basic and elemental rights of human decency and life?.......one thing we can read from your insensitive and senseless comment is that you are another radical muslim who is disgracing the good willed and charitable muslims (and I know a bundle) who would even give their own life to help others......the world has seen enough of these killing butchers who are a true chilling menace to this world.
    Comments page of 2
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