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Author Gabriel García Márquez Dies

Gabriel García Márquez, the influential, Nobel Prize-winning author of One Hundred Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera, has died. He was 87.

Widely considered the most popular Spanish-language writer since Miguel de Cervantes in the 17th century, García Márquez achieved literary celebrity that spawned comparisons to Mark Twain and Charles Dickens.

His fictional works outsold everything published in Spanish except the Bible. The epic 1967 novel One Hundred Years of Solitude sold more than 50 million copies in more than 25 languages.

García Márquez, a native of Colombia, is widely credited with helping to popularize "magic realism," a genre that blends the everyday with fantastical elements.

García Márquez won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1982 for his novels and short stories. When he won the award, he called Latin America a "source of insatiable creativity, full of sorrow and beauty."

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