News / Africa

Political Deadlock in Guinea to be Mediated

Men stand and watch as a fire rages in the background during clashes between rival gangs in Marche Madina, in Conakry Mar. 1, 2013
Men stand and watch as a fire rages in the background during clashes between rival gangs in Marche Madina, in Conakry Mar. 1, 2013
Jennifer Lazuta
— Guinea's government and opposition leaders have agreed to bring in an international mediator to facilitate talks over the organization of much-delayed legislative elections.  The move could be an important first step to loosening the political deadlock that has already delayed the polls by two years and led to repeated violent street protests. 

Guinea has not had an elected National Assembly since before the death of longtime president Lansana Conté in December 2008.  There was a military coup within days of Conte's death, followed by a tumultuous two-year transitional period, followed by a hotly contested and at-times violent presidential election in 2010.

Legislative elections were supposed to be held four months after President Alpha Condé took office in December 2010.

They have been pushed back multiple times due to disputes over the organization of the polls. The opposition accuses the government of trying to rig the elections in their favor.  The government says the opposition is holding up the process.

But the two sides could be ready to work past their differences.  The government has accepted an opposition request to hold talks in the presence of an international mediator to get the electoral process back on track.

Ruling party member Alhousseny Makanera Kake says this acceptance shows that they are open to anything that will allow the elections to move forward with little delay.  He says the mediator is meant to help resolve the differences between their different points of view.

Both sides say they want a mediator from an independent international body, ideally West African regional bloc ECOWAS or the United Nations.

Moctar Diallo, a former government minister and a member of the main opposition coalition, said international mediation is necessary for successful talks, and free and fair elections.

It will ensure that the entire process remains honest, he said.  He says they have been in this same crisis for more than two years.  He says it is time to organize elections and finish the transition to civilian rule.

The elections were most recently scheduled for May, however it looks unlikely that the country will be ready by then.

Guineans say they hope the mediated talks will be a step in the right direction.  However, many remain frustrated with the political class.

University student Malick Toure says now they want to bring in outsider to solve their problems? He says the country has tried that before.  Maybe Guinea just needs to resolve its own problems, he says, and the two sides should sort things out face to face.

President Condé will name the international mediator.  Each side will also be able to select a third-party facilitator to participate alongside them.

You May Like

University of Michigan Wins Solar Car Race

Squad guided its student-designed solar-powered vehicle to fifth consecutive time victory in eight-day bi-annual American Solar Challenge More

Nigerian Islamic School Tries to Combat Boko Haram

Kaduna school headmaster teaches his students that what militants are doing is are doing is 'a total misunderstanding of the Islamic religion' More

University Trains Students to Advocate for Deaf People Worldwide

Program prepares graduates to advocate internationally for access to education, jobs for people with disabilities More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Diakite from: China
March 23, 2013 2:08 AM
After the recent ethnicclashes in the country, I think each side has understood that no one has interest for creating incontrolable troubles which favor the come back of military state or even a somalization of the country. If we fall into such situation like Somalia, the talks for holding elections will change to the talks of ceasefire. And for how long?

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid