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British PM Talks Security In Surprise Visit To Libya

British Prime Minister David Cameron has made an unannounced visit to Libya to discuss strengthening the country's security against militants.

On arrival in the capital Tripoli Thursday, Mr. Cameron took a walk in the Martyrs' Square where he shook hands with some of the onlookers.

Speaking to reporters, he said that British police investigating the 1988 bombing of a passenger jet over the Scottish town of Lockerbie would soon visit Libya. He also noted that investigators of the 1984 murder of policewoman Yvonne Fletcher outside the Libyan embassy in London had been able to come to Tripoli three times since the 2011 revolution.

Cameron said such cooperation would have been unthinkable before Gadhafi was toppled and killed in 2011.



"We will never forget the damage that Gadhafi did, not only to your country but to our country too, and that leads me to the last thing I want to say, which is to thank you for your help and your government's help with some of these important legacy issues.''



During a stop at a training center outside Tripoli, Mr. Cameron told police recruits that the role they are undertaking now is even more important than their participation in the revolution that got rid of the Gadhafi regime. He said Britain is committed to help with the training.

The British prime minister arrived in Tripoli from Algeria where he discussed a security partnership with local authorities in the wake of the recent hostage crisis there at a natural gas plant. Six Britons are believed to have been among 37 foreign hostages killed in the military rescue operation.

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