Burma's Democracy Leader Hopes Election Win Brings New Era

Burma's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi looks on from behind the gates of the National League for Democracy (NLD) office as supporters and reporters gather, in Yangon, April 2, 2012.
Burma's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi looks on from behind the gates of the National League for Democracy (NLD) office as supporters and reporters gather, in Yangon, April 2, 2012.
Daniel Schearf

Burma's democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she hopes her and her party's win in Sunday's election ushers in a new era in Burma. Although she and her National League for Democracy will hold only a fraction of power in parliament, they are expected to be an active opposition to the military-backed government.

Hundreds of supporters and media gathered outside Aung San Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy headquarters Monday morning to hear her give a brief victory speech.

The party announced Sunday that she and her fellow NLD candidates swept Burma's by-election, winning almost all of the 45 seats up for grabs.

If confirmed, the results would be a public rebuke of the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party, which holds an overwhelming majority of parliament seats.

The Nobel Prize winner pledges that when she and her party enter government after more than two decades in political exile, they will cooperate with all those willing to work for national reconciliation.

Aung San Suu Kyi called Sunday’s vote a hopeful sign for democracy and reconciliation in Burma.

"We hope that this will be the beginning of a new era where there will be more emphasis on the rule of the people in the everyday politics of our country,” she said.

Aung San Suu Kyi said the NLD, once in parliament, would continue to push for the rule of law, an end to all ethnic conflicts, and amendments to the constitution.

Amending the military-drafted constitution will be a challenge for the NLD.  Even if it wins all of the seats in Sunday's election it is still only about 7 percent of the several hundred filled by mainly with the military and its supporters.

Those lawmakers have little incentive to support constitutional amendments.  The current constitution guarantees continued military dominance in government, reserving it a quarter of all seats in parliament.

Suzanne DiMaggio, vice president of Global Policy Programs at the Asia Society, says despite the NLD's uphill challenge in parliament, the victory is still relevant.

“In particular now, we have at least the beginning of opposition voices within the parliament - credible opposition voices - and I think this is the beginning of something that will only grow,” she said.

DiMaggio says the election results show it is time for the United States to consider lifting economic sanctions against Burma.

The U.S. and the European Union, among others, restrict trade with Burma because of its human rights record.  The EU trade commissioner on Monday said if the election proves to be free and fair the bloc would consider lifting sanctions at meetings in Brussels on April 21.

The NLD on Friday said it did not expect the election to be free and fair.

Aung San Suu Kyi said the NLD would publicize all irregularities that took place in order to ensure they are not overlooked.  The NLD pointed out names of dead people on voter registration lists as well as multiple voters using the same registration number.

Some voters also complained of wax on voter ballots that did not allow them to be marked properly.

War Thein Kha village in Kawtmu township is Aung San Suu Kyi's constituency.

Ethnic Karen Minorities in the Kawhmu Township, War Thein Kha Village by Daniel Schearf

The poor and remote village was thrust into the spotlight when Burma's most famous prisoner of conscience chose here to register her household.

Nan Myat Myat Thu Win, 23, and her family run a small shop next to the house. She says she hopes Aung San Suu Kyi can help the village's unemployed but she acknowledges even with the election win the NLD would hold little power.

She says, “at least she can present problems such as poverty to parliament.  Whether they are solved or not depends on the government.”

Everyone in War Thein Kha who spoke with VOA counted themselves as Aung San Suu Kyi supporters.

Ninety-five-year-old Daw Aye has lived in the village her whole life.  She says she loves Aung San Suu Kyi and would never vote for the military-backed USDP.

“I don't like them [USDP] so I won't vote for them,” she said. “They have been ruling for a long time. So, it should be Aung San Suu Kyi's time.”

The official election results are not expected for a few days.

The current situation of Burma's ethnic minorities

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
by: Romildo Caldas
April 02, 2012 12:30 PM
Burma's Democracy Leader Aung San Suu Kyi recall us the Story of Queen Esther registered in the Bible. Aung is in Burma just for this Historical Event.

by: Optimist
April 02, 2012 9:53 AM
Good news for the people of Myanmar and a victory for Democracy. This is a triumphant victory for world peace in that part of the world. wherever democracy triumphs the world heals a little bit more, and in that part of the world the world heals more than a little. What mystifies me most is, wherever US wants for genuine democracy to flourish they help prop up the suitable candidate to win, and in Ethiopia the US is helping a genocidal dictator to keep his post, just because it suites NEOCONS.

by: Jai Tai
April 02, 2012 8:19 AM
I like to say thanks you on hehalf of Burmese, Shan, Karen and all monorities people in Burma to Aung San Suu Kyi, NLD, President Thein and his administration for giving amzaing opportunity to the people of Burma to have thier voices, freedom and hope. Withought their hard work and strong determination, Burma will never see the lights. Thank you!

by: Cả Thộn
April 02, 2012 6:43 AM
Myanmar is in new era. Suu Kyi is a new super star on new stage. I myself give most, if not all, credits to Thei Sein because I believe this man lets good things happen in Myanmar. I hope that Thein Sein and Suu Kyi will work well together to make Myanmar a better country and Myanmarians enjoy better life there.

by: Zayar
April 02, 2012 6:22 AM
I am so happy as a burmese citizen.It is people's victory.The HLUTTAW will be more active .NLD will protect people.

by: Shan
April 02, 2012 5:48 AM
The changing movement in Myanmar is so exciting; that will bring the democracy to one of most poorest country in the world; i really admires Ms Aung San Suu Kyi for her courage and country love and I also think that the Myanmar government had the good decision for their country and for their people. I am happy with the changes in Myanmar and I hope that Vietnamese Leader can be courage like their friends in Myanmar to change the Vietnamese stronger, our people have more democracy and fair.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
After Paris Attacks, France Steps Up Fight Against ISi
November 24, 2015 3:04 AM
The November 13 Paris attacks have drawn increased attention to Syria, where many of the suspected perpetrators are said to have received training. French President Francois Hollande is working to build a broad international coalition to defeat Islamic State in Syria and in Iraq. Zlatica Hoke reports.

Video After Paris Attacks, France Steps Up Fight Against IS

The November 13 Paris attacks have drawn increased attention to Syria, where many of the suspected perpetrators are said to have received training. French President Francois Hollande is working to build a broad international coalition to defeat Islamic State in Syria and in Iraq. Zlatica Hoke reports.

Video US, Cambodian Navies Pair Up in Gulf of Thailand

The U.S. Navy has deployed one of its newest and most advanced ships to Cambodia to conduct joint training drills in the Gulf of Thailand. Riding hull-to-hull with Cambodian ships, the seamen of the USS Fort Worth are executing joint-training drills that will help build relations in Southeast Asia. David Boyle reports for VOA from Preah Sihanouk province.

Video Americans Sharpen Focus on Terrorism

Washington will be quieter than usual this week due to the Thanksgiving holiday, even as Americans across the nation register heightened concerns over possible terrorist threats. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports new polling data from ABC News and the Washington Post newspaper show an electorate increasingly focused on security issues after the deadly Islamic State attacks in Paris.

Video World Leaders Head to Paris for Climate Deal

Heads of state from nearly 80 countries are heading to Paris (November 30-December 11) to craft a global climate change agreement. The new accord will replace the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change that expired in 2012.

Video Uncertain Future for Syrian Refugee Resettlement in Illinois

For the trickle of Syrian refugees finding new homes in the Midwest city of Chicago, the call to end resettlement in many U.S. states is adding another dimension to their long journey fleeing war. Organizations working to help them integrate say the backlash since the Paris attacks is both harming and helping their efforts to provide refugees sanctuary. VOA's Kane Farabaugh reports.

Video Creating Physical Virtual Reality With Tiny Drones

As many computer gamers know, virtual reality is a three-dimensional picture, projected inside special googles. It can fool your brain into thinking the computer world is the real world. But If you try to touch it, it’s not there. Now Canadian researchers say it may be possible to create a physical virtual reality using tiny drones. VOA’s George Putic reports.

Video New American Indian Village Takes Visitors Back in Time

There is precious little opportunity to experience what life was like in the United States before its colonization by European settlers. Now, an American Indian village built in a park outside Washington is taking visitors back in time to experience the way of life of America's indigenous people. Carol Pearson narrates this report from VOA's June Soh.

Video Even With Hometown Liberated, Yazidi Refugees Fear Return

While the northern Iraqi town of Sinjar has been liberated from Islamic State forces, it's not clear whether Yazidi residents who fled the militants will now return home. VOA’s Mahmut Bozarslan talked with Yazidis, a religious and ethnic minority, at a Turkish refugee camp in Diyarbakır. Robert Raffaele narrates his report.

Video Nairobi Tailors Make Pope Francis’ Vestments

To ensure the pope is properly attired during his visit, the Kenya Conference of Catholic Bishops asked the Dolly Craft Sewing Project in the Nairobi slum of Kangemi to make the pope's vestments, the garments he will wear during the various ceremonies. Jill Craig reports.

Video Cross-Border Terrorism Puts Europe’s Passport-Free Travel in Doubt

The fallout from the Islamic State terror attacks in Paris has put the future of Europe’s passport-free travel area, known as the "Schengen Zone," in doubt. Several of the perpetrators were known to intelligence agencies, but were not intercepted. Henry Ridgwell reports from London European ministers are to hold an emergency meeting Friday in Brussels to look at ways of improving security.

Video El Niño Brings Unexpected Fish From Mexico to California

Fish in an unexpected spectrum of sizes, shapes and colors are moving north, through El Niño's warm currents from Mexican waters to the Pacific Ocean off California’s coast. El Nino is the periodic warming of the eastern and central Pacific Ocean. As Faiza Elmasry tells us, this phenomenon thrills scientists and gives anglers the chance of a once-in-a-lifetime big catch. Faith Lapidus narrates.

Video Terrorism in Many Forms Continues to Plague Africa

While the world's attention is on Paris in the wake of Friday night's deadly attacks, terrorism from various sides remains a looming threat in many African countries. Nigerian cities have been targeted this week by attacks many believe were staged by the violent Islamist group Boko Haram. In addition, residents in many regions are forced to flee their homes as they are terrorized by armed militias. Zlatica Hoke reports.

Video Study: Underage Marriage Rate Higher for Females in Pakistan

While attitudes about the societal role of females in Pakistan are evolving, research by child advocacy group Plan International suggests that underage marriage of girls remains a particularly big issue in the country. VOA’s Ayesha Tanzeem reports how such marriages leads to further social problems.

VOA Blogs