News / Asia

New Chinese Law Allows for Search, Expulsion of Foreign Ships

Chinese fishing boats sail in the lagoon of Meiji reef off the island province of Hainan in the South China Sea, July 20, 2012.
Chinese fishing boats sail in the lagoon of Meiji reef off the island province of Hainan in the South China Sea, July 20, 2012.
VOA News
China will soon allow border police to board and search foreign ships that enter what Beijing considers its territorial waters in the disputed South China Sea.

In a move likely to raise regional tensions, state media say police in the southern island province of Hainan will soon be authorized to "land on, check, seize, and expel foreign ships" that enter the area illegally.

The official China Daily says "illegal" activities include entering the province's waters without permission and "engaging in publicity that endangers China's national security." It says the new rules will take effect January 1.

Hainan, China's southernmost province, administers nearly two million square kilometers of the sea. In July, the Chinese military angered its neighbors by setting up a garrison in Hainan's newly established Sansha City, in an effort to enforce its claims in the region.

Many of China's rival claimants, which include the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia and Taiwan, are concerned about what they see as Beijing's increasing assertiveness in defending its claims in the energy-rich South China Sea.

Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hong Lei said in a regular briefing Thursday that China has the right to implement the new regulations.

"Carrying out maritime management according to law is the justified right of a sovereign country," said Hong.

The China Daily also said new maritime surveillance ships will soon join Beijing's South China Sea patrol fleet, which has been expanded following recent high-profile standoffs with the Philippines and Vietnam.

Meanwhile, the Philippine Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario on Thursday called on China to withdraw three ships from the site of an April standoff.

Del Rosario told ABS-CBN television that Beijing has not fulfilled its promise to remove its ships from the disputed Scarborough Shoal, as agreed by both countries six months ago.

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by: Vuthy from: Philippine
December 02, 2012 3:05 AM
It is a bit late, but if people don't stop them now, you won't have the chance again.

by: tony from: US
December 01, 2012 10:53 PM
There is no way to reason with most posters here. This is because they are already biased. Calm down, look in the mirror. You may be the cause of all the problem with your nationalist and naive views about China. Ever heard of Negotiation, Posturing? Don't just take everything at face value. There are stuff going on behind close doors. As long as Philippines and Vietnam meet China 'half way' there is a chance for settlement. In particular Noi Noi should learn to shut up in public and stop annoying China. Vietnam probably will settle first with China. Again, don't annoy China, be very well behaved and once China cools down, she might just make a deal with these countries. The moment China sense the smaller countries wants to bring US into the negotiation, she will teach them a lesson and just slow down progress. That is what she did to Philippines for being foolish. If Vietnam allows US to use her port, there will be zero chance for settlement.
China have to live with her neighbors forever, I don't think she is that belligerent and senseless. Just posturing.

by: Doc Hilliard from: SoCal USA
December 01, 2012 9:43 PM
This is the sort of thing that started the US v. UK War of 1812.

"Deja Vu all over again"

by: Mike from: Haley
December 01, 2012 7:49 PM
To get a good view on what the U.S. is doing about China's attempts to control the seas surrounding it read the excellent series of articles that started in August on www.ArmySignalOCS.com. Each article looks at one of the countries affected by China's stance and discusses what America should do to help counter it. The conclusion is in this month's December story, but you should read the whole series because they are quite frank about America's own failings too.

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
December 01, 2012 7:43 PM
@Hoang from canada. You are right. So lets fight between Vietnam and China to test if China is a superpower.
China is more assertive than before that is because China got the power now! Get away from South China sea. Look at the timing, what just happened? the landing of the J15 on Liaonin carrier. Yes, and then a new era started.
Now the question is whether USA wants to share the world with China or to die with China together.

by: Hoang from: Canada
December 01, 2012 12:22 PM
To Ed604,
To compare China to `superpowers` like U.S.A, England or even Japan is a joke. China is only good at stealing technologies from other countries.
If it weren`t for the U.S.A.politicians like Nixon or Kissinger who opened up China to counter Soviet Union in the 1950`s, gave them U.N. permanent membership; or Clinton who gave China U.S.technology away to China and sent all the manufacturing jobs to China; China would be no where.
Even India created atomic bombs on their own, meanwhile China stole atomic bomb technology from U.S.A.
China is no superpower but should be compared to sea pirates like Somalia.

by: emie from: canada
December 01, 2012 10:10 AM
@ed604, First of all china is the biggest cry baby still crying about ww2 and Japan. Second, china invades Tibet which is like invading the Vatican, which show how coward they r to invade a COUNTRY which does not have real military. Third, there r 1.4(approx.)billion ppl in china ,which if u ratio iliterate (smarts,ETC.),china ratio is 65/35 and 65 ilierate. Fourth, as ppl we learn through our mistake in history and try not to repeat it, we have to progress. Lastly, china might feel they r super power but if war does occur they will feel the wrath because no one will back down then china will be back to where they started 30 yrs ago ,FACT.


by: TheView from: US
December 01, 2012 8:37 AM
It's in these Chinese culture to fake, steal, lies & etc... Who invented the Black Market? They would claim to invented most everything else.

by: dumbchin from: us
December 01, 2012 8:34 AM
Some these Chin comments are correct. Those in power will temporarily rule. These smaller countries need to get Nuke weapon period.

by: bean cube from: Seattle WA
December 01, 2012 1:28 AM
Without history, Tibet, China; Taiwan, China; Japan, Phillipine, Vietnam and especially those smaller countries will become nothing. Selling out literacy and betraying historical records are not just a disastor to China, they are disastors to those smaller countries. If you don't believe it, you can try more to repress them. Internal problems will haunt all your law system in just a few months. You won't get enough compensations from those QE3 barbaric money for your internal system damages. Be really careful about those right wing extremist politicians repeating bad histories in your countries.
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