News / Asia

    China Angry Over Obama-Dalai Lama Meeting

    FILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama speaks before members of the Japanese parliament, at the upper house members' office building in Tokyo, Nov. 13, 2012.FILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama speaks before members of the Japanese parliament, at the upper house members' office building in Tokyo, Nov. 13, 2012.
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    FILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama speaks before members of the Japanese parliament, at the upper house members' office building in Tokyo, Nov. 13, 2012.
    FILE - Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama speaks before members of the Japanese parliament, at the upper house members' office building in Tokyo, Nov. 13, 2012.
    Shannon Van Sant
    China has issued an angry reaction to news that President Obama will meet with the Tibetan spiritual leader Friday at the White House,warning there will be consequences for the U.S. if the meeting is not canceled.

    Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said the meeting is a "crude interference" with China’s internal affairs, adding that any foreign country that meets with the Dalai Lama will find its own interests hurt in the end. 

    Obama has met with the Dalai Lama twice before, in 2010 and 2011.  China issued similar angry responses to those meetings.  Friday’s meeting will take place in the White House Map Room, not in the Oval Office. 

    The Dalai Lama’s visit to the U.S. comes amid rising tensions between China and the U.S. over territorial disputes in the East and South China Seas.  Obama has announced a rebalancing of U.S. foreign policy and military focus to Asia, which some see as a response to China’s growing power in the region. 

    Despite China’s warnings, Free Tibet spokesperson Alistair Currie says Obama’s meeting with the Dalai Lama is unlikely to have a negative longterm impact on U.S. China relations. 

    “So it does seem that China makes a lot of bluster about this, and it’s attempting to bully world leaders to say, this is our importance.  But of course China is dependent on trade with the rest of the world.  It can only bluff so much,” said Currie.

    Since February 2009 more than 126 people have self-immolated in Tibetan areas of China in protest of Chinese government policies. 

    The Sichuan provincial government recently issued new regulations that punish families, communities and Buddhist temples of those that self-immolate.  The provisions include seizure of land and assets.  China has called protesters who self-immolate terrorists. 

    China has also blamed violence in Xinjiang Province, home to China’s Muslim Uighur minority, on religious extremists and separatists.  More than 100 people have died in violent protests in Xinjiang over the last year.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 2
     Previous    
    by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
    February 22, 2014 9:44 AM
    Tibet has been part of China for thousand years! Da lai is a liar, shame on you!
    In Response

    by: Wangchuk from: NY
    February 28, 2014 12:00 PM
    A thousand years? Jon Huang is a CCP propaganda agent but even he can't get the Party line right. The CCP claims Tibet has been part of China since the 14th C. Yuan Dynasty, not 1,000 years. Actually Yuan were Mongols not Chinese. Ming Dynasty had no control over Tibet. Manchu Qing had some dominion over Tibet but it was colonialism & Manchus never considered Tibet part of China. Tibet gained independence from Qing in 1912 and was fully independent at time of the PRC invasion 1950.

    by: Jason from: China
    February 22, 2014 8:37 AM
    Tibet has belonged China since 1261,not 1951.Many words in this article have a large amount of fraudulence .I am Chinese ,so i see the truth .all of the Chinese people want to make friend with American including me ,but America must be fair and respect China .
    In Response

    by: Wangchuk from: NY
    February 28, 2014 12:02 PM
    No historian outside CCP supports the PRC claim of Tibetan history as comrade Jason put it. Actually Tibet was fully independent at time of PRC 1950 invasion and no Chinese imperial dynasty ever considered Tibet to be part of China. There simply is no historical evidence to support comrade Jason's claims.

    by: Wangchuk from: NYC
    February 21, 2014 9:48 AM
    As a Tibetan, I want to thank Pres. Obama for meeting w/ His Holiness the Dalai Lama & showing his support for our struggle for human rights, democracy & self-determination. The PRC has occupied Tibet since 1951, murdered thousands of Tibetans, destroyed our monasteries, and turned Tibet into a giant police state where Tibetans are treated as 2nd class citizens & have no genuine freedom. I just hope Obama does more for Tibetans (& human rights in China) other than just meet the Dalai Lama.
    In Response

    by: Brenda from: China
    February 21, 2014 10:46 AM
    I don't agree with your idea. As a Tibetan, the Chinese government offers good qualities of education for our children and uses lots of money to build infrastructure. We can't live a happy life without the help of our government!

    by: JKF2 from: GREAT NORTH (Canada)
    February 21, 2014 9:23 AM
    The gvmt of China needs to take a reasoned stand wrt the Dalai Lama; much the same mature approach they took on Hong Kong, much the same mature approach they took on Tawain, much the same mature approach they are taking on WTO issues and so on. Not only should the US President meet with the Dalai Lama, but so should have Chinese officials, and start building a constructive relationshhip, and stop the continued rejectionist policies, that so far have proven antagonistic, destructive, and a useless effort.

    China, as a new world power, needs to start addressing its relationships in a mature manner, duly reflecting its 4000+ year old heritage, that befits its new global economic and political power. So far the antagonistc and destructive relationship, between China and the Dalai Lama, have only proven to affect China's image very negatively, much the same as it was , initially wrt Hong Kong transition statements, and on Taiwain, and on WTO org, etc.

    I think China's gvmt would benefit significantly from showing a mature approacch and leadership on the issue of the Dalai Lama/Tibet and bring about a peaceful accomodations of the interests of all the parties. The current adversarial approach has not worked in the past, does not work currently, and no one expects it to work in the future, it is a needless obstacle, causing friction, to better relations with all.
    In Response

    by: Jonathan Huang from: Canada
    February 22, 2014 11:39 AM
    What China should do is to learn from Canada and USA, setting Tibetan reservations which is a mature government should do!
    Ok, it's sarcasm!
    In Response

    by: windson from: china
    February 21, 2014 11:29 AM
    Thanks for your kind suggestions, but the issues that relate to ethnics,religions,territories,cultures,etc are always very hard to be settled.Tibet was officially annexed by central china in 1261 rather than 1951. We inheritted the Tibet from our ancestor,nobody dares to give it up.So the Tibetans either local or exiled must hold a pragmatic attitude or stance to your claims.Anyway to seperate from china is impossible,and will never be.We can join together to pursue our common future of justice,equality,wealth,prosperity etc.

    by: Bearman from: U.S.A.
    February 21, 2014 7:43 AM
    Though I am not a fan of the president, the Dalai Lama is a man of peace. I personally think that he is well worth supporting. The Chinese can go pound sand.

    by: BUSINESSFEEDBACK from: New York
    February 21, 2014 7:37 AM
    CHINA, when you talk about consequences to the US, we the business people that are thinking of doing business with CHINA get concerned and put a business related negotiations or activities on hold....because of fear of what That threatening language means to the business relation between both nations. If you CHINA want stable and continuous business relations with the rest of the world you need to modify your mode of communication...it get us nerves. Thank You
    In Response

    by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
    February 22, 2014 9:53 AM
    @wimdsom from China. I agree with most your comments but America threat is real to China. Just look how America used fake excuse to invade Iraq and how many innocent Iraqis and afghanis were murdered by Americans.
    We shall leave no chance to America to hurt our nation. And Tibet is part of China forever!
    In Response

    by: windson from: china
    February 21, 2014 12:00 PM
    Many thanks for your relatively sincere suggestions.I agree with you to some degrees.Both china and USA are great countries, and their people are very friendly.I would say the majority of the chinese people have a good impression to the American people, hold a gratitude mood to what the American people had done(even sacrificed) for us during the 2nd world war, but the governments from both sides are a little bit paranoid to one another.I think the only reason may be the "fear" in our heart which originated from mistrusts.That's ridiculous! An famous american once said,the only fear that we fear is the fear itself.We must keep the words in our hearts.

    by: archlingua from: Guatemala City, Guatemala
    February 21, 2014 7:18 AM
    Of course China is angry at Obama for meeting with the Dalai Lama, because it emphasizes world opinion against the illegal annexation, through armed invasion, of Tibet by China in the 1950s. But the U.S. can do no less.
    In Response

    by: SEATO
    February 23, 2014 6:11 PM
    Rubbish ! Talking like you, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and Russia are all parts of China. The Mongols took over these countries and ruled their large empire from China.That didn't mean,they historically belonged to China.On the same line,the Japanese could say: "China was part of the Manchurian Qing Dynasty for nearly 300 years.Manchuria later became part of Japan,so historically China is part of Japan". Would the Chinese like that?
    In Response

    by: windson from: china
    February 21, 2014 12:31 PM
    I am sorry to say you are misguided by wrong propagandas. Anyway china's convoluted 5000 years' history is like dense fog which blinds your eyes try to look through the fog to pursue the truth--that's reasonable.
    The truth is central china of HAN nationality and Tibet of Tibetan nationality were both annexed by YUAN dynasty of MONGOLS in 1271.Thence, Tibet become an inalienable part of china,we can say we inherited the Tibet from our ancestors.
    Comments page of 2
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