News / Asia

China, Russia Slam US Report on Human Trafficking

Rohingya minority children look out through a window of a bus after they were rescued by Thai authorities in Songkhla province, southern Thailand, Jan. 11, 2013. Nearly 700 boat people from Myanmar's beleaguered Rohingya minority were rescued from alleged human traffickers in two separate raids near Thailand’s southern border.Rohingya minority children look out through a window of a bus after they were rescued by Thai authorities in Songkhla province, southern Thailand, Jan. 11, 2013. Nearly 700 boat people from Myanmar's beleaguered Rohingya minority were rescued from alleged human traffickers in two separate raids near Thailand’s southern border.
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Rohingya minority children look out through a window of a bus after they were rescued by Thai authorities in Songkhla province, southern Thailand, Jan. 11, 2013. Nearly 700 boat people from Myanmar's beleaguered Rohingya minority were rescued from alleged human traffickers in two separate raids near Thailand’s southern border.
Rohingya minority children look out through a window of a bus after they were rescued by Thai authorities in Songkhla province, southern Thailand, Jan. 11, 2013. Nearly 700 boat people from Myanmar's beleaguered Rohingya minority were rescued from alleged human traffickers in two separate raids near Thailand’s southern border.
VOA News
China and Russia are criticizing a U.S. report that cited both countries among the world's worst in fighting sex trafficking and forced labor.

In its annual report on human trafficking, released Wednesday, the U.S. State Department dropped Beijing and Moscow to its lowest possible rating, putting them at the same level as North Korea and Iran.

A Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson on Thursday called the report "arbitrary," saying Washington should take an "objective and impartial" view of its efforts to fight human trafficking.

In Moscow, Russia's Foreign Ministry suggested the State Department was simply ranking countries according to their degree of sympathy with Washington.  It threatened to retaliate against any sanctions that could result from the designation.

The report said an estimated one million people in Russia are exposed to “exploitative” labor conditions characteristic of trafficking cases, such as non-payment for services, physical abuse and very poor living conditions.

State Department report - Tier IIIState Department report - Tier III
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State Department report - Tier III
State Department report - Tier III
The report described China as a "source, transit and destination country" for men, women and children subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking.  It also said the Chinese government’s one-child policy has resulted in a ratio of 118 boys to 100 girls, creating a demand for the trafficking of foreign women as brides and for forced prostitution.

Uzbekistan was downgraded to the worst level, known as Tier Three, because of what the report said is its state-sanctioned use of forced labor in its annual cotton harvest.

Iran, North Korea, Cuba, Sudan and Zimbabwe are among the 21 countries rated at the lowest level in terms of human trafficking. The list of Tier Three countries also ijncludes Algeria, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Kuwait, Libya, Mauritania, Papua New Guinea, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Yemen.

In the report, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the United States has a moral obligation to meet the challenge of ending human trafficking.  He called the practice an assault on freedom and basic human dignity.

President Barack Obama will determine by September whether to order sanctions against China, Russia and Uzbekistan.

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by: Jake from: Jones
June 20, 2013 1:18 PM
I notice the forced labour system implemented by corrections corporation of america is also missed.

by: The Kills from: Charlotte
June 20, 2013 1:13 PM
Forced labor? If you don't believe the US is a country that believes in forced labor, try owning property without having a job. You can't, you won't be able to pay the taxes. The US believes in "soft kill" and uses it in every aspect of force. They won't hold a gun to your head and tell you to keep finger painting, they'll just make it impossible for you to stop. Patriots need to unite.
In Response

by: Anonymous
June 20, 2013 4:08 PM
you cant OWN property anywhere on the planet without having some type of money to pay for it idiot. but you probably think the world owes you something for free. you need to wake up
In Response

by: dimpeople
June 20, 2013 3:57 PM
Do you think you have a right to property or something? of course you have the right to own property, but that doesn't mean the government is supposed to give it to you. It takes money to live. nobody is forcing you to own property either. It sounds like you're the type of person that believes they deserve everything, but shouldn't have to give anything back. loser.
In Response

by: joe from: joe
June 20, 2013 2:55 PM
Ownership is a government service. Without the government sanctioning your ownership your just saying it belongs to you. The alternative is that people calme what they want and we all defend our property with violence.
In Response

by: Anonymous
June 20, 2013 2:20 PM
Why would you be able to own a property without having money? You want everything for free? Go live in the jungle and hunt for food...oh no thats forced labor too

by: dan smith from: florida
June 20, 2013 12:48 PM
Yet Saudi Arabia isn't noted, amazing.
In Response

by: Chaos777 from: Georgia
June 20, 2013 6:11 PM
And it never will be noted as a major news story as long as the West is vested in Saudi Arabian oil even though they are buying Syrian girls right now... and you see how they care so much about that humanitarian crisis. I go to school... just started a few weeks back and there is essentially no class time except role call. It's all shop hours unless we request to take a test on a school computer. The school doubled their labor rate for people bringing in there cars to be fixed because the department budget was stripped. I feel I'm missing a good deal of instructional time but they are running a business in that shop and move as many cars through as they can. I even have to punch a time card. It's really quite bizarre.
In Response

by: Jon from: San Antonio, TX
June 20, 2013 5:52 PM
Yes, it is. Don't stop at the first paragraph when you read an article.
In Response

by: Aman from: Saudi Arabia
June 20, 2013 4:36 PM
When our allies misbehave, we look the other way.
In Response

by: aman from: sudan
June 20, 2013 4:32 PM
Read before you write
In Response

by: wjusti1966
June 20, 2013 4:09 PM
actually, it was mentioned as well as some other middle east countries.
In Response

by: Robert from: Southern California
June 20, 2013 3:50 PM
Did you not read the entire article?

"Iran, North Korea, Cuba, Sudan and Zimbabwe are among the 21 countries rated at the lowest level in terms of human trafficking. The list of Tier Three countries also ijncludes Algeria, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Kuwait, Libya, Mauritania, Papua New Guinea, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Yemen."

Saudi Arabia is clearly noted. I can also think of half a dozen other countries that should be on the tier 3 list but I am sure they are not there due to their relationship with the U.S. government1

by: Buck Mast from: Tennessee
June 20, 2013 11:48 AM
As Mark Twain said 175 years ago"The truth NEVER hurts unless it should"And Communist China and Russia are both screaming in pain
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