News / USA

US Airlines to Comply With China Defense Zone

US Warplanes Defy China Air Defense Zonei
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November 27, 2013 6:41 AM
The U.S. military has made clear its position on China's new aviation restricted zone by flying two bombers through the area. China recently restricted air space in part of the East China Sea to assert its claim over a group of disputed islands. VOA Pentagon correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.

VIDEO: U.S. military has makes clear its position on China's new aviation restricted zone by flying two bombers through the area. VOA Pentagon correspondent Luis Ramirez has more.

VOA News
The United States has advised American commercial airlines to notify Beijing of flight plans over China's newly-declared air defense identification zone, although U.S. officials say the compliance does not indicate U.S. government acceptance of China's requirements.

The Chinese Defense Ministry declared last week that all aircraft in the zone must identify themselves and obey Chinese orders.

Chinese-produced J-10 fighter jet displayed outside offices of the Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing, Nov. 28, 2013.Chinese-produced J-10 fighter jet displayed outside offices of the Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing, Nov. 28, 2013.
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Chinese-produced J-10 fighter jet displayed outside offices of the Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing, Nov. 28, 2013.
Chinese-produced J-10 fighter jet displayed outside offices of the Aviation Industry Corporation of China, Beijing, Nov. 28, 2013.
Japan, the United States and South Korea have refused to recognize the Chinese-declared air zone. All three have challenged the zone by sending in military aircraft. The United States, which is obligated by treaty to defend Japan and South Korea, sought to underscore its position by flying two B-52 bombers over the islands this week.

China said Friday it had sent two fighter jets to monitor U.S. and Japanese aircraft that flew into its newly declared air defense zone over the East China Sea.

China's official Xinhua news agency quoted Defense Ministry spokesman Shen Jinke Friday as saying the fighter jets identified two U.S. and 10 Japanese aircraft during their flights over disputed islands controlled by Tokyo and claimed by Beijing.

The report made no mention of any communication or other engagement between the Chinese planes and the U.S. and Japanese aircraft. Washington and Tokyo have not yet commented on the report.

Beijing said Thursday it had sent warplanes into the region on a monitoring mission, but Friday marked the first time officials have reported the monitoring of specific foreign aircraft.

The Chinese response raises the stakes in an international standoff over the the uninhabited islands, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China.

Chinese officials reacted calmly to the U.S. overflights by simply acknowledging them and saying the Chinese military had monitored them without taking action. But that measured response ignited criticism on Chinese micro-blogging sites and in some state media.

The festering dispute with Japan is one of several maritime controversies pitting China against Asian nations, including the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei and Malaysia.

Beijing has indicated a willingness to negotiate the disputes, but so far has rejected calls for multilateral negotiations. It has sought separate talks with each country.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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by: SEATO
November 30, 2013 5:15 AM
It is all hot air from China.They didn't expect such strong and resolute reactions from the US,Japan and South Korea.The report about scrambling 2 fighter jets to monitor the US and Japanese planes,is just an attempt to save their face,contradicting to threatened use of "Emergency defensive measures" rhetoric that they used when they first imposed the new ADIZ.For clarity,Chinese readers should understand this issue: The Senkakus have never been Chinese territory.Japan annexed them in 1895 and so officially became Japanese territory.Japan later sold them to a Japanese family to set up a tuna processing plant.Basically,they privatised them,and they are still parts of Japan.Now,Japan decided to renationalise them,basically transferring them from private ownership to government control,and they are still Japanese territory.So what 's the racket all about? From the begining in 1895 till now,the Senkakus have always been under Japanese jurisdiction,no change in Status Quo.The Chinese are simply after the resources in the region and want to exert their new found Superpower status by setting new rules and carving out new border lines themselves,like claiming 90% of the South China Sea.However,they have met strong protests and condemnations all over Asia because these are clearly international waters.As a UN member state,China should act in accordance to international laws and UNCLOS 1982, if it wants to be respected by the rest of the world.Being aggressive and unreasonable would only isolate China even more.China should respect the truth and stop fueling nationalist fervour back home with lies and drive the Chinese on the war path

In Response

by: Anonymous
December 03, 2013 10:21 AM
A robber politely told the victim that this stuff was kept in my hands for many years, it you declare that this belongs to you, my children could be confused and certain tension could be caused. You should just tolerate the status and keep silent, otherwise you have to take the responsibility if any conflict happens.

In Response

by: Meiji's Insanity from: Japan
December 01, 2013 2:10 AM
In 1894, right before the Japanese took over the Diaoyu islands, they belonged to Taiwan. It's as if history doesn't exist before whatever convenient date Japanese ultranationalists want to quote.


by: toshio from: japan
November 30, 2013 3:17 AM
hey,
relax and calm down guys, we are living on a small planet. do not be greedy, let's share the places with friendly minds

In Response

by: Friedrich
November 30, 2013 11:37 PM
It's no use to tell him so.How can't Japanese be greedy?You used share, I'm afraid I can't agree with you.Diaoyu Island was stolen in 1895 by Japanese.Before that Diaoyu Island has already been China's territory.The Japanese said their government sold Diaoyu Island to a Japanese family so I just want to ask"How can you sell things that you stole from your neighbor to others?It's that right?"Japanese always declare that Diaoyu Island belongs to them.But they can't prove.They don't have prooves but Chinese have!And the most important thing is that the Japanese is driving themselves on the war path!NOT the Chinese!


by: Anonymous
November 30, 2013 2:07 AM
We cannot understand why China' Air Defense Identification Zone has caused so much concern from Japan and US who have established their own such zone years ago. The Diaoyu Island dispute was caused by the Japanese government purchase of the island. So stop fingerprinting China for escalating the tension. Media like VOA should be unbiased in reporting such stories. Do not follow the idiot spokeswoman of the US State Department who needs to learn more about the modern world history!

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
December 01, 2013 3:38 AM
The reason why Japan denounces China on its DAIZ are that first, it overlaps with both Japanese and Korean zones and second, it hurts Japanese sovereignty of Japanese territorial aiir over Senkaku islands. Senkaku islands has been owned by a Japanese citizen and so that It implicirly belongs to Japan originally and at least satus quo. China can not change statu quo by unilateral provocative way. If China wants to set its own DAIZ, it can be permitted at presen if its DAIZ is drawn outside the those of Japan and Korea.


by: riano baggy from: indonesia
November 29, 2013 7:55 PM
japan,china and taiwan,south korea and philippines must seat together again and talks about air defence zone. When one country to spread their adz the others country can do like this make overlapping.

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
December 01, 2013 3:48 AM
To anonymous, it is very kind of you if you identify youraself even only your origin. You are heard unilateral to assert Taiwan is still apart of China because many Taiwnese do not favor to be governed by Chna and many countries als acknowledge Taiwan as an independent nation.

In Response

by: Anonymous
November 29, 2013 10:25 PM
All of them are used to be parts of China before. Now, Taiwan is still a part of China. No need to talk, China is protecting Asia's peace.


by: Mifune from: Japan
November 29, 2013 3:11 PM
I'm afraid the Chinese Scramble is just a lie, because Washington and Tokyo are too silent about it. This may be the last provocation from China which urgently wants to calm down its people's voices. It means the U.S. and Japan win this dispute.

In Response

by: Anonymous
December 01, 2013 6:03 AM
so stupid

In Response

by: Nguyễn from: US
November 30, 2013 2:26 PM
Chinese aircrafts are invisible flying nearby, that was why US and Japanese airmen in the ADIZ could not and did not see them.

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
November 29, 2013 11:41 PM
I agree with you. Intelligence should be true and open, not be manipulated. No provocation works for the solution of any territorial disputes even against week and small countries, needless to say against Japan. If China wants to negotiate the territorial issue and change status qou, it should spend a long time to make a patient effort to draw compromise from conterparts by showing its own compromise. I am sure there is some way for China to open the door for drawing such a compromise from Japan. Not a few Japanese people know Senkaku or Diaoyu islands have complicated and delicate historical process to have been included into Japan in late ninety eighties around the end of the Sino‐Japanese War.

In Response

by: Jacob from: China
November 29, 2013 10:37 PM
All contries need to calm down, and all of us need a peaceful world.


by: 7676 from: Japan
November 29, 2013 3:04 PM
China... even the stinking Iranians are laughing at you.

In Response

by: Peace
November 29, 2013 10:26 PM
Japan is just USA's follower.

In Response

by: tugar from: China
November 29, 2013 10:10 PM
nytimes.com : Airlines Urged by U.S. to Give Notice to China

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