News / Asia

Chinese Ships Re-Enter Disputed Waters

Aerial photo from Kyodo News aircraft show Chinese marine surveillance ship Haijian No. 51, front, as Japan Coast Guard ship sails near disputed islands, East China Sea, Sept. 15, 2012.
Aerial photo from Kyodo News aircraft show Chinese marine surveillance ship Haijian No. 51, front, as Japan Coast Guard ship sails near disputed islands, East China Sea, Sept. 15, 2012.
VOA News
Four Chinese surveillance ships have entered waters near disputed Japanese-controlled islands in the East China Sea, further intensifying a bitter territorial dispute.
 
Japan's Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba said Tuesday authorities have called on the ships to leave the Japanese waters, and that a complaint has been lodged with China's government.

In Beijing, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman said the four surveillance ships were patrolling waters near the islands, known in Japan as Senkaku and in China as Diaoyu. The spokesman also said China opposes what he called an illegal entrance into the waters by "Japanese right-wingers." He described the move as a "provocation."
 

China and Japan both claim control of the uninhabited islands, which are surrounded by rich fishing grounds and potential energy deposits. China has been sending patrol and surveillance ships and fishing boats into the area.
 
There are concerns the dispute may hurt the strong economic relationship between China and Japan, Asia's two largest economies.
 
Last week, Japanese coast guard ships exchanged water cannon fire with coast guard vessels and fishing boats from Taiwan, which also claims the islands.
 
Some information for this report was provided by AFP.

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by: Samurai from: Japan
October 03, 2012 7:55 AM
@Yoshi from Sapporo, your comment this time does not look like yours. The current problem is not sharing of resources. What we Japanese have to do is to respect justice (observation of International Law). Do you allow Chinese or Taiwanese to intrude into Japanese inherent territories or to loot Japanese resources and vandalize Japanese properties just because their outrageous demands are not satisfied? Chinese and Taiwanese must courteously ask Japanese to let them purchase such resources. We Japanese never bow to the threats from such countries that do not observe International Law. It is high time Japan amended its constitution so as to drive out a swarm of Chinese and Taiwanese ships.


by: hannibal from: San Francisco
October 03, 2012 1:31 AM
@ Charlie
The islands were taken illegally after the First Sino-Japanese War and were to be returned under the conditions of the San Francisco Treaty.


by: JJKing from: USA
October 02, 2012 11:14 PM
Charlie from UK is so ignorant of East Asian history and current affairs that his comments are ]nothing but biased opinions against China. GO back to school and read some history and current affairs.


by: leezy from: chian beijing
October 02, 2012 10:21 PM
share the resources? Are you kidding me? the daoyu island is to belong to china. no matter China or Taiwan.


by: patriot from: philippines
October 02, 2012 9:14 PM
Its time that Asian nations except China, Cambodia and North Korea confront the aggressive territorial expansion of the Chinese dragon. Chinese themselves call China a rising power and they wish to reestablish the old imperial system of China at the center with tributary states paying tribute to China. This is definitely not welcome to most Asian states, and the pivot of the US to Asia combined with the shift toward the US of Asian states wary of China's bullying is very timely


by: Dongguo from: Sydney
October 02, 2012 7:50 PM
Charlie,

You should know the history before talking. The islets were orginally Chinese and receded to Japan based on an invalid agreement. Japan promised after the 2nd world war their return to China including Taiwan. However, the US was in control of the islets under the UN - actually the UN is the most undemocratic organisation evercreated in history.


by: Samurai from: Japan
October 02, 2012 6:52 PM
@Yoshi from Sapporo, your comment this time does not look like yours. The current problem is not sharing of resources. What we Japanese have to do is to respect justice (observation of International Law). Do you allow Chinese or Taiwanese to intrude into Japanese inherent territories or to loot Japanese resources and vandalize Japanese properties just because their outrageous demands are not satisfied? Chinese and Taiwanese must courteously ask Japanese to let them purchase such resources. We Japanese never bow to the threats from such countries that do not observe International Law. It is high time Japan amended its constitution so as to drive out a swarm of Chinese and Taiwanese ships.


by: Yamato from: Japan
October 02, 2012 6:38 PM
you are wrong to think that Japan is relying on the USA to come to its aid... i can tell you that after we see what Obama did to Mubarak in Egypt and the stab in the back to Israel... i mean look what he is doing to ISRAEL !!! the US and Israel are tied as if by umbilical cord... yet Obama betrayed Israel... so we here in Japan do not believe we should trust anything said by the US... we will handle China by ourselves...


by: Mark Rzs
October 02, 2012 6:28 PM
It'll be very interesting to see if a water-cannon fight will break out this time! Of course, Japanese are not so bold with the Chinese as they were a few days ago when they sprayed Taiwanese ships..


by: neon from: United States
October 02, 2012 1:28 PM
@Yoshi,

you know funny thing, China for the longest time was willing to set the actual sovereignty dispute aside and try to negotiate a resource sharing deal with Japan but Japan wouldn't have it. So it seems like everyone is the loser in this game right now. Well, everyone except the United States lol. Tension but not conflict between Japan and China severs US interests in the region

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