News / Asia

China on Alert After Japan Scrambles Jets over E. China Sea

Handout photograph taken on a marine surveillance plane B-3837 shows the disputed islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, December 13, 2012.
Handout photograph taken on a marine surveillance plane B-3837 shows the disputed islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, December 13, 2012.
VOA News
China says it is on alert after Japan dispatched fighter jets over the East China Sea.

Japanese media report Japan sent F15 fighter aircraft after detecting a Chinese marine surveillance plane in disputed airspace near contested islands in the East China Sea.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying told reporters Tuesday Beijing will pay close attention to Japan's decision to dispatch fighter jets.  She said China's surveillance plane was conducting routine patrols at the time.

"As far as I know, China's marine surveillance plane you mentioned has been conducting routine patrols in airspace over the East China Sea," Hua said.  "The Chinese side is highly concerned with and alert to Japan sending the air self-defense force jets."

Japanese defense officials say the Y-12 propeller plane from China's State Oceanic Administration was spotted about 100 kilometers north of the uninhabited islands, known in Japan as Senkaku and in China as Diaoyu.  After Japan scrambled fighter jets, the plane left the area.

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The islands have been a source of major tension between the two Asian powers.

Earlier this month, China and Japan engaged in a diplomatic dispute after a Chinese government plane flew near the contested islands.

Japan lodged an official protest and summoned China's ambassador in Tokyo.

Japan also described the incident as the first-ever "intrusion" by a Chinese plane into what Japan considers its airspace.  Chine said the plane's mission was "completely normal."

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by: RedHose from: North Carolina
December 25, 2012 7:24 PM
China is just doing what China does best: Steal.
In Response

by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
December 26, 2012 3:12 AM
Taiwan owns Diaoyu island! And China has all the right to protect Taiwan's properties from being stolen by Japan.
In Response

by: Vega from: Los Angeles
December 26, 2012 2:30 AM
It's not stealing if it was originally yours to begin with.
In Response

by: Vega from: Los Angeles
December 26, 2012 2:17 AM
You can't steal something that originally belonged to you.
In Response

by: Joe from: Adelaide
December 26, 2012 12:30 AM
China has poor laws and poor judgment. Makes crappy things (I used to buy) which I hope their armed forces use in every piece of equipment they use for war. So if there becomes a showdown over these rocks I see the floor of the ocean being filled with crap.
In Response

by: RedHose from: North Carolina
December 25, 2012 9:42 PM
@Jeffrey
I do know about Chinese history. The current Regime came to power following the 1949 'Democratic Revolution' (What happened to the democracy?). Is the Chinese government paying you much for being a troll?
In Response

by: JeffreyGuan from: Qingdao China
December 25, 2012 8:25 PM
China is not quite what you said!She is doing what she should do !Maybe you don't know very well about Chinese history young man.I think your idea is not fair to China,which is peace-loving country.

by: WFHN from: California
December 25, 2012 2:46 PM
Fighting over a speck of mud in the middle of the ocean shows just how ridiculously stupid humans are.
In Response

by: Anonymous
December 27, 2012 10:04 PM
You are right. The disputes may arise from a well designed game to trigger wars in Asia. Maybe, it is related to weapon dealers, or those who want to see world wars or Sino-US or Sino-JP wars.
In Response

by: Vega from: Los Angeles
December 26, 2012 2:35 AM
@Jay - historically, which country has been aggressive towards the other? I think China is trying to understand the lessons of history, and this time won't back down. Showing weakness to Japan in the past encouraged them to act belligerently.
In Response

by: Larrybudwiser from: Princeton, NJ
December 25, 2012 9:20 PM
Looks like this story really got the Chinese trolls up and running. China is a paper dragon that needs to imprison harmless citizen and creates a "wag the dog" senerio to cover theirmisdeed against the people of the world. They can not import enought food or materials and have created a environmental nightmare in their own country. They will fall from this peak quicker than they rose to it.
In Response

by: Jay Casey
December 25, 2012 8:10 PM
Of course it is not about a speck of mud. It is about rights to undersea resources and shipping lanes as well as national territory. It's as if your neighbor wanted a part of your back yard. Do you let him take a small piece without compensation? If you let him will he stop there?

Japan (or the US for a time) has controlled the islands for decades so they are in effect, Japan's. China is now claiming islands and sea all the way from Brunei to Japan - area they haven't controlled in history or in recent decades. They say they landed on those islands centuries ago. That would be like the US claiming the moon because they landed there first. If Japan doesn't stand up to China they will just encourage China's aggressiveness.
In Response

by: TianBao yan wo from: New York
December 25, 2012 5:37 PM
China is not fighting over a speck of mud. China is fighting over the air space and sea route to keep USA submarine and Air surveillance away from its water.

USA is also uncomfortable if China is listening in near the coast of America. Extra space is useful in Arms conflict. In another word, you won't want the bad guys near your fence or back yard.





In Response

by: InquiringMind from: CA
December 25, 2012 3:03 PM
I am neutral on the China and Japan islands dispute!
However, Diaoyu Islands is within U.S. and Japan mutual defense pact according to Congress and Senate.
What kind of two faces, double talks and self righteous lie is that?
Only U.S. can tell that kind of lie with a straight face!

by: Haron from: Afghanistan
December 25, 2012 2:24 PM
I guess it would be silly action by Japan. this means that Japan erase their Areas by their hands. 60 millions against 1400 millions I think fourth class student can measure that which amount are high. and no doubt that China is the big ally of Russia. as India, North Korea, Iran, Ukraine, Belarus and other tens countries are supporting in Military section by Russia. China is receiving all Military equipment from Russia any time. at all I think it is not good action for Japan. maybe achievement will be 5%. but, destruction will be 100%
In Response

by: InquriingMind from: CA
December 25, 2012 2:58 PM
Japanese cars and products are not selling as usual in China because Chinese are protesting Japan on stealing Diaoyu Island from China.
Japan wants to be tough with China.
Japan is depending U.S. for security and want to do business as usual with China.
What kind of delusional thinking is that?
Japan thinks it might work.
This is 2012 now, not 1800s anymore.
Can't kept holdling on to yesterday!
In Response

by: Mikhelin from: Massachusetts USA
December 25, 2012 2:53 PM
True, China and Russia is unbeatable giant...If Japanese doesn't have any USA/Western Diplomat..China will accept Japanese free to fly anywhere above China. China/Russia doesn't trust Japanese becuz of USA two faces.

by: Jose Dy Piao from: US
December 25, 2012 2:22 PM
China is bullying their Asian neighbors. They think just because they have economic influence they can just start bullying. We should boycott any "made in china", besides anything made in china is low quality.
In Response

by: neon from: US
December 25, 2012 3:10 PM
There are plenty of people boycotting Made in China stuff. Doesn't seem like its doing anything. Americans want cheap goods, and for the time being, China makes those cheap goods. Good luck getting the thrifty part of the US population to join lol
In Response

by: InquiringMind from: CA
December 25, 2012 2:54 PM
Self denial, self righteous as usual.
How come you are using China made PC to post your delusional messages on internet.
China made PCs are pretty because so many anti-China internet posters are using China made PCs to post their delusional messages on internet.
Do look around your house's electronics because most of them might had embedded China made ICs in them.
Put your money where your mouth is and throw them away.
Talk tough and do tough and clear out all your China made electronics in your home!
In Response

by: Dave from: USA
December 25, 2012 2:53 PM
The problem with this is that the U.S. has a protection agreement with Japan. Can any one say WW3, over some uninhabited island and a few miles of fishing rights.
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