News / Middle East

Syrian Forces Pound Rebel Positions in Aleppo

A Free Syrian Army fighter runs after a Syrian Army tank shell explodes in the Salah al- Din neighbourhood of central Aleppo, August 5, 2012.
A Free Syrian Army fighter runs after a Syrian Army tank shell explodes in the Salah al- Din neighbourhood of central Aleppo, August 5, 2012.
VOA News
The Syrian army continued attacking rebel positions Sunday in the northern city of Aleppo with heavy shelling and helicopter gunships.
 
The country's biggest city has become a key battleground in the nearly year and a half uprising against President Bashar al-Assad's rule, as government forces reportedly mass ahead of what is expected to be a strong offensive against the rebels.
 
The opposition Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported that more than 40 Syrians, including 25 civilians, were confirmed as killed Sunday across the country.  The British-based group said more than 24 others were killed a day earlier.  The casualties have not been independently verified.
 
Kidnapped Iranians
 
Meanwhile, Iranian media said Tehran has asked Turkey and Qatar to help secure the release of 48 Iranian nationals kidnapped Saturday in Damascus.  Iran says the victims were religious pilgrims, but a brigade commander with the Free Syrian Army describes them as elite Iranian Revolutionary Guards.
 
Iran backs the Syrian government, while Turkey and Qatar support the Syrian opposition. 
 
Former Iranian President Abolhasan Bani Sadr tells VOA that the captured Iranians were not armed or wearing Revolutionary Guard uniforms.  He says Iran is definitely helping President Assad and that the stakes are very high for his country.
 
He says that the fall of the Assad government would not only be a heavy blow to Iranian prestige and influence in the region, but it would also reinforce U.S. policy of containing Iran.  He says Tehran views any toppling of President Assad as signifying that Iran's turn could be next.

  • A truck catches flames after it was hit by rockets fired by a Syrian Air Force fighter plane during an air strike in the village of Tel Rafat, some 37 km (23 miles) north of Aleppo, August 9, 2012.
  • A general view shows a street after clashes between Free Syrian Army fighters and forces loyal to President Bashar Al-Assad, in Salah Edinne district, in the center of Aleppo, August 9, 2012.
  • A Free Syrian Army fighter fires an anti-aircraft gun as a Syrian Air Force fighter bomber fires rockets during an air strike in the village of Tel Rafat, some 37 km (23 miles) north of Aleppo, August 9, 2012.
  • In this photo taken on guided government tour, Syrian army forces are seen at al-Sijen district, in the center of Aleppo, August 9, 2012.
  • A Syrian man reacts after the funeral of 29 year-old Free Syrian Army fighter, Husain Al-Ali, who was killed during clashes in Aleppo, in the cemetery in town of Marea on the outskirts of Aleppo city, August 9, 2012.
  • Men search for bodies under rubble of a house destroyed by a Syrian Air force air strike, in Tel Rafat, about 37 kilometers north of Aleppo, Syria, August 8, 2012.
  • In this citizen journalism image provided by Shaam News Network SNN, Syrians attend the funeral procession of a man killed in Idlib province, August 7, 2012.
  • A Free Syrian Army fighter runs after a Syrian Army tank shell exploded in the Salah al- Din neighbourhood of central Aleppo, August 5, 2012.
  • Free Syrian Army fighters fire their rifles during clashes with Syrian Army soldiers in the Salah al- Din neighbourhood of central Aleppo August 5, 2012.
  • Free Syrian Army fighter holds a RPG launcher during clashes with Syrian Army in the Salah al- Din neighbourhood of central Aleppo August 5, 2012.
  • This image map provides an overview of the activity seen in Aleppo from July 23, 2012 to August 1, 2012 (base image collected on July 29, 2012).
  • More than 600 probable artillery impact craters, represented here with yellow dots, were identified in Anadan, in the vicinity of Aleppo.
  • In this August 5, 2012 photograph, Syrians pass by a destroyed house in town of Atareb outskirts of Aleppo, Syria.
  • Free Syrian Army fighter runs for cover during clashes with Syrian Army soldiers in the Salah al- Din neighborhood of central Aleppo August 5, 2012.
  • Syrian women mourn the loss of loved ones in Aleppo fighting, August 5, 2012.
International Debate Continues
 
The U.S. State Department announced Sunday that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will visit Turkey later this week to discuss the deteriorating situation in Syria. 
 
The United Nations General Assembly on Friday voted overwhelmingly to condemn the Security Council for its failure to act and condemned the Syrian regime for using heavy weapons.  

Kofi Annan's Six-Point Peace Plan
 
  • A Syrian-led political process to address the aspirations and concerns of the Syrian people.
  • A U.N. supervised end to armed violence by all parties in Syria.
  • Timely humanitarian assistance in all areas affected by fighting.
  • Increasing the pace and scale of release of arbitrarily detained people.
  • Ensuring freedom of movement for journalists.
  • Respecting freedom of association and the right to demonstrate peacefully.
The U.N. special envoy to Syria, Kofi Annan, resigned Thursday in frustration with the world body's failure to act decisively to prevent  the bloodshed in Syria.  Mr. Annan said he could not be the only one working for peace while the fighting between Syrian forces and the rebels intensified.  Mr. Annan's peace plan for Syria included an immediate cease-fire and talks on a transitional government. 
 
Russia and China have vetoed three Security Council resolutions that would have held President Assad responsible for his failure to abide by Mr. Annan's peace plan and threatened him with sanctions. 

Some information for this report was provided by AFP and Reuters.

 

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Comments page of 2
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by: VJNNC from: GSO, NC
August 05, 2012 9:24 AM
Really, Iran? How about YOU release those YOU'VE kidnapped first!?

by: Anthony from: USA
August 05, 2012 9:20 AM
So now why would pilgrims armed to the teeth, want to go pray in a warzone...hmm somethings fishy in Alepo.

by: Wally Geez from: USA
August 05, 2012 8:36 AM
It's nice to see Iran get a taste of their own medicine. They have been sponsoring terrorism for years and making these kidnappings a common occurrence to other nations!
In Response

by: moni from: london
August 05, 2012 12:06 PM
well done, that is true

by: hank from: US
August 05, 2012 8:33 AM
Hostage taking is never a positive thing. Iranians have a lot of experience in hostage taking. I wonder how they feel when they are the victims.
In Response

by: Pete from: USA
August 05, 2012 4:19 PM
I agree that hostage taking is never positive. Iran has participated in hostage taking in the past. However, it must be remembered that we Westerners, too, should not be too self-righteous. Hostage taking and assassination have been integral parts of Western colonialism since the very first conquests. Of course, two wrongs never make a 'right', but why are Western powers of many thousands of kilometers away, so interested in a change of government in Syria. In terms of 'universality', what would we in the United States think if the People's Republic of China was attempting to become deeply involved in domestic troubles in Mexico, and, with the help of Cuba and Guatemala, providing rear-guard bases and arms to keep an insurrection afloat, perhaps with narco-traffickers? We would say that it is none of their business to foster that type of 'change' so close to our borders...in our part of the world. Why should Iran, Lebanon and the Shia Muslims feel differently about Syria? All of the powers against Syria's current government are either very pro-Western, 'NATO' aligned or Sunni Muslim. It should also be remembered that, as in Libya, a number of Syrian insurgents said that they never had any intention of abiding by cease-fires because they had the unwritten agreement of the major Western powers to ignore the cease-fires.

by: Nikos Retsos from: Chicago, USA
August 05, 2012 8:26 AM
What 48 Iranians have been doing in Syria? It will be hard to digest the Iranian explanation that they are religious pilgrims. With Syria in a civil war, and neighborhoods turning into rubble daily from street battles, from artillery shelling, from aircraft bombing, and from army helicopters firing on every street suspected by the government of being under rebel control, is this a time for foreigners to venture into Syria either for a religious pilgrimage or for tourism?

Iranians are on the wrong side of the Syrian conflict, and Iranians caught in Syria now may not get a pass from the Syrian rebels - no matter what was their purpose of being there. Nikos Retsos, retired professor
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