News / Asia

    Dozens Dead in China Knife Attack

    Reuters
    At least 28 people were killed in a "violent terrorist attack" at a train station in the southwestern Chinese city of Kunming by a group of unidentified people brandishing knives, five of whom were shot dead, state media said on Sunday.
     
    Another 162 people were injured, the official Xinhua news agency added. It said the attack had taken place late on Saturday evening.
     
    "It was an organized, premeditated violent terrorist attack," Xinhua said.
     Police shot dead five of the attackers and were searching for around five others, it added.
     
    Kunming resident Yang Haifei told Xinhua that he was buying a ticket when he saw a group of people, mostly wearing black, rush into the station and start attacking bystanders.
     
    "I saw a person come straight at me with a long knife and I ran away with everyone," he said. Those who were slower were caught by the attackers.
     
    "They just fell on the ground."
     
    Graphic pictures on the Twitter-like microblogging service Sina Weibo showed bodies covered in blood lying on the ground at the station.
     
    There was no immediate word on who was responsible.
     
    State television's microblog said domestic security chief Meng Jianzhu was on his way to the scene.
     
    Weibo users took to the service to describe details of what happened, though many of those posts were quickly deleted by government censors, especially those that described the attackers, two of whom were identified by some as women.
     
    Others condemned the attack.
     
    "No matter who, for whatever reason, or of what race, chose somewhere so crowded as a train station, and made innocent people their target — they are evil and they should go to hell," wrote one user.
     
    The attack comes at a particularly sensitive time as China gears up for the annual meeting of parliament, which opens in Beijing on Wednesday and is normally accompanied by a tightening of security across the country.
     
    China has blamed similar incidents in the past on Islamist extremists operating in the restive far western region of Xinjiang, though such attacks have generally been limited to Xinjiang itself.
     
    China says its first major suicide attack, in Beijing's Tiananmen Square in October, involved militants from Xinjiang, home to the Muslim Uighur people, many of whom chafe at Chinese restrictions on their culture and religion.
     
    Hu Xijin, editor of the influential Global Times newspaper, published by the ruling Communist Party's official People's Daily, wrote on his Weibo feed that the government should say who it suspected of the attack as soon as possible.
     
    "If it was Xinjiang separatists, it needs to be announced promptly, as hearsay should not be allowed to fill the vacuum," Hu wrote.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 4
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    by: JKF2 from: GREAT NORTH (Canada)
    March 04, 2014 11:56 AM
    This henious, criminal, and terrorist attack, against and targetting innocent civilians has absolutely no justification whatsoever. Deliberately murdering and wounding innocent civilians most be countered by the thougest actions against those that carried it out, planned it, and supported it. Terrorist attacks are becoming the norm, on global scale; just the other day, in Africa nearly 100 children were murdered by criminal terrorists at a school, and unfortunately many gvmts are not acting to prevent them; such attacks need to be condemed by all civilized people. Such attacks are never justified.

    by: mnMarner
    March 03, 2014 6:39 AM
    Say a little prayer for them who are innocent and indeed the attackers should go to hell.

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    March 03, 2014 4:26 AM
    It is yet to be investigated what is the aim of these mobs. But no matter what it is, I certainly condemn this terrorist attack and mourn innocent sufferers. What I would like to add, if permitted, is that this kind of awful incident would not have happened if complete freedom of speech is offered and assured to all of regular Chinese people. Thank you.
    In Response

    by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
    March 04, 2014 12:22 AM
    Oh, really? I read your post again, and yes, you did related free speech to terrorist attack.
    Know I feel you are even smarter! Lol
    In Response

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    March 03, 2014 9:05 PM
    To Jonathan, I am now telling about the Chinese case. American gun violence has nothing to do with my posting. Thank you.
    In Response

    by: jonathan huang from: canada
    March 03, 2014 10:28 AM
    you are sooo clever!!! if complete freedom of speech is offered and assured to all of regular American people, then all the campus shooting, theater shooting and the Boston pressure cooker bombing would never happened, right? Thank you.

    by: Koan-Po from: China
    March 02, 2014 1:02 PM
    the Terrorists were screening "Ala u Akber" while butchering all our innocent people. Now, we have an "investigation" to determine who might they be.... lets see... could they be Catholic Priests...? or maybe Jewish Rabbis...? or maybe Shaolin Monks...? no, you don't think so..? just don't tell me you think that they were Muslims... not the religion of piss...

    by: mai from: china
    March 02, 2014 12:35 PM
    curse the evil

    by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
    March 02, 2014 10:07 AM
    How funny VOA quickly replaced this article with another one which can't be commented. The west is scared how united we chinese are!

    by: oldlamb from: Guangzhou
    March 02, 2014 9:02 AM
    Why did the sepratists choose Kunming city as a target to vandalize innocent life?
    1\The vigil of Kunming is lower than the city in east as Beijing,Shanghai,Guangzhou.
    2\Kunming is loose city for separatists,extremists and terrorists to trafficking of drug.
    3\Because Kunming is the capital of Yunnan province where nearby the territorial boundaries of Burma,Laose, Vietnam,This is so call the Golden triangle of hard drug.Particularly for the East Turkestan terrorists who come from XinJang region usally get to gather in Kunming.


    by: Happy Fisher from: chongqin
    March 02, 2014 7:49 AM
    We are Chinese ,we must unite as one,pray for them

    by: Wong Zhanbo from: Lanzhou,China
    March 02, 2014 5:07 AM
    player hard and work hard

    by: jeremy from: beijing
    March 02, 2014 3:55 AM
    it seems voa is one of big bosses behind this attach,judging from its descriptions&analyses
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