News / Asia

Dozens Dead in China Knife Attack

Reuters
At least 28 people were killed in a "violent terrorist attack" at a train station in the southwestern Chinese city of Kunming by a group of unidentified people brandishing knives, five of whom were shot dead, state media said on Sunday.
 
Another 162 people were injured, the official Xinhua news agency added. It said the attack had taken place late on Saturday evening.
 
"It was an organized, premeditated violent terrorist attack," Xinhua said.
 Police shot dead five of the attackers and were searching for around five others, it added.
 
Kunming resident Yang Haifei told Xinhua that he was buying a ticket when he saw a group of people, mostly wearing black, rush into the station and start attacking bystanders.
 
"I saw a person come straight at me with a long knife and I ran away with everyone," he said. Those who were slower were caught by the attackers.
 
"They just fell on the ground."
 
Graphic pictures on the Twitter-like microblogging service Sina Weibo showed bodies covered in blood lying on the ground at the station.
 
There was no immediate word on who was responsible.
 
State television's microblog said domestic security chief Meng Jianzhu was on his way to the scene.
 
Weibo users took to the service to describe details of what happened, though many of those posts were quickly deleted by government censors, especially those that described the attackers, two of whom were identified by some as women.
 
Others condemned the attack.
 
"No matter who, for whatever reason, or of what race, chose somewhere so crowded as a train station, and made innocent people their target — they are evil and they should go to hell," wrote one user.
 
The attack comes at a particularly sensitive time as China gears up for the annual meeting of parliament, which opens in Beijing on Wednesday and is normally accompanied by a tightening of security across the country.
 
China has blamed similar incidents in the past on Islamist extremists operating in the restive far western region of Xinjiang, though such attacks have generally been limited to Xinjiang itself.
 
China says its first major suicide attack, in Beijing's Tiananmen Square in October, involved militants from Xinjiang, home to the Muslim Uighur people, many of whom chafe at Chinese restrictions on their culture and religion.
 
Hu Xijin, editor of the influential Global Times newspaper, published by the ruling Communist Party's official People's Daily, wrote on his Weibo feed that the government should say who it suspected of the attack as soon as possible.
 
"If it was Xinjiang separatists, it needs to be announced promptly, as hearsay should not be allowed to fill the vacuum," Hu wrote.

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by: Taichi Robinhood from: Florida
March 02, 2014 1:12 AM
The terrorist group is inviting heavier and sharper responses from the Chinese Government. Terrorism will disappear in a short time as long as the government deals the heavy blows to such groups. Support the Chinese Government in cracking such groups.


by: Alan from: China
March 02, 2014 1:03 AM
What does the quotation mark on "violent terrorist attack" mean??? It is so obvious and VOA still think this is claim of religion??? If so, then "911" is no longer a terrorist attack any more, 'cause it is just a claim of some people in middle east.


by: linda from: china
March 02, 2014 1:02 AM
innocent people. hate violence and attack


by: Mary from: Usa
March 02, 2014 12:20 AM
My heart goes out to these prople and the families. What a horrible thing. God have mercy on your people. Please end this evil.


by: Hallofrecord from: US
March 02, 2014 12:14 AM
No guns involved so American press will generally ignore this atrocity. Only guns are used in mass murders... not bombs or knives.


by: D from: Tally
March 02, 2014 12:06 AM
They should ban those assault knives! Muslims in the world show their true colors.


by: Anonymous from: US
March 02, 2014 12:04 AM
Damn assault knives, they should make them illegal


by: conscience
March 01, 2014 11:38 PM
Damn the terrorists


by: Pei from: China
March 01, 2014 11:10 PM
Chinese people likes peace all,so ,we hate terrorist

In Response

by: Jonathan from: USA
March 02, 2014 12:02 AM
I am so sorry for your loss. America grieves with you.


by: dai from: china
March 01, 2014 11:04 PM
" matter who, for whatever reason, or of what race, chose somewhere so crowded as a train station, and made innocent people their target — they are evil and they should go to hell,"

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