News / Africa

Early Results Show Close Race for Guinea Presidency

Guineans wait for the results of the election in front of the town hall of Motato, a suburb of Conakry where electoral officials collected and verified ballots from regional polling stations, 9 Nov 2010.
Guineans wait for the results of the election in front of the town hall of Motato, a suburb of Conakry where electoral officials collected and verified ballots from regional polling stations, 9 Nov 2010.

The first results from Guinea's presidential election show a close race between the country's former prime minister and a long-time opposition leader.

With less than 10 percent of votes reported, former prime minister Cellou Diallo has a slight lead over opposition leader Alpha Conde.  Mr. Diallo won most of the expatriate vote reported from 12 consulates abroad, while Mr. Conde won all five districts reported so far.

Guinea's electoral commission and international observers hope the transparency of Sunday's vote will convince both candidates to abide by their promise to accept the results.

Siaka Toumany Sangare is the president of Guinea's electoral commission.

In the interest of transparency, Sangare says three copies of all results were produced: one for each candidate's representative and one for the electoral commission tabulation.

Sangare says both candidates had permanent representatives in the counting hall 24 hours a day to examine the results.  Nothing is hidden, he says, everything is open to everyone.

Former Nigerian leader Yakubu Gowon helped observe this election for the Carter Center. He says Guinea's electoral commission - which is known as the CENI - has done everything it can to give both candidates confidence in the validity of the outcome.

"The CENI adopted a transparent communications strategy to inform the public and dispel rumors because they spread uncontrollably.  The inclusion of representatives of both candidates' alliances at every step of the electoral process increased transparency and should allow both candidates and their supporters to more readily accept the results," Gowon said.

Mr. Diallo's campaign is already contesting results from two districts that have not yet been reported.  Foday Fofana is a spokesman for the campaign.

In the commune of Matoto, Fofana says Conde officials used lemon juice to wash indelible ink from the fingers of Conde supporters so they could vote twice.

Mr. Diallo and Mr. Conde are from Guinea's two largest ethnic groups, and violence between their supporters delayed this vote several times. Security forces have been on alert since Sunday's poll to prevent further clashes.

Final results are due by midnight Wednesday.

You May Like

South Korea Divided on Response to North’s Cyber Attack

In past five years, officials in Seoul have accused Pyongyang of hacking into banks, government websites, causing chaos and inflicting millions of dollars in damages More

Video Calm Amid Fear in Daily Life in S. Sudan’s Bentiu

Residents have been trying to regain some sense of normalcy, but planning for the future remains uncertain as fear of attacks looms More

2015 Could Be Watershed for Syria Conflict

Republican control of US Senate in January could lead to more aggressive policy against IS militants in Syria - and against regime of Bashar al-Assad More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Jane Monheit Christmas Speciali
X
December 22, 2014 8:15 PM
Chanteuse Jane Monheit sings the holiday classic “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” and explains why it’s her favorite song of the season.
Video

Video Jane Monheit Christmas Special

Chanteuse Jane Monheit sings the holiday classic “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” and explains why it’s her favorite song of the season.
Video

Video Trade Talks Could Heat Up in 2015

With boosting trade a top priority for the Obama administration, 2015 may be the year that an agreement is finally reached on the Trans Pacific Partnership. But the trade deal, which is intended to boost trade between 12 Pacific countries, faces opposition as VOA's Jim Randle reports.
Video

Video Ugandan Doctors Aid Victims of Sudan's Civil War

In Sudan's state of South Kordofan, the number of amputees as result of civil war is in the thousands, but few have access to sufficient medical help. Adam Bailes recently visited the area and says a small team of Ugandan doctors has been providing remote help, producing new prosthetic limbs for those in need.
Video

Video Calm Amid Fear in Daily Life in S. Sudan’s Town of Bentiu

Six months ago, Bentiu was a ghost town. The capital of northern Unity State, near South Sudan’s important oil fields, had changed hands several times in fighting between government forces and rebels. Calm returned in November and since then, residents of Bentiu have been trying to regain some sense of normalcy. Bentiu’s market has reopened there are plans to start school again. But fears of new attacks hang heavy, as Benno Muchler reports from Bentiu.
Video

Video US Business Groups Press for Greater Access to Cuba

President Barack Obama's decision to do all he can to ease restrictions on U.S. trade, travel and financial activities with Cuba has drawn criticism from some conservatives and Republicans. People who bring tourists to the island and farmers who want to sell more food to Cuba, however, think they can do a lot more business with Cuba. VOA's Jim Randle reports.
Video

Video Three Cities Bid for Future Obama Presidential Library

President Barack Obama still has two years left in his term in office, but the effort to establish his post-presidential library is already underway. The bid for the Obama Presidential Library is down to four locations in three states -- New York, Hawaii, and Illinois. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, each of them played an important part in the president’s life before he reached the White House.
Video

Video Fears of More Political Gridlock in 2015

2014 proved to be a difficult year politically for President Barack Obama and a very good year for the U.S. Republican Party. Republican gains in the November midterm elections gave them control of the Senate and House of Representatives for the next two years -- setting the stage for more confrontation and gridlock in the final two years of the Obama presidency. VOA National Correspondent Jim Malone has a preview from Washington.
Video

Video Sudan School Becomes Target of Aerial Attacks

The school dropout rate is at an all-time high in Sudan's South Kordofan state because many schools have been destroyed during the three-year civil war between the government and SPLA-N rebel forces. Adam Bailes visited Sudan's Nuba Mountains' region and reports many children are simply too scared to go to school

All About America

AppleAndroid