News / Middle East

Egypt Court Dissolves Muslim Brotherhood's Political Wing

FILE - Egyptian anti-riot soldiers stand guard in front of a destroyed banner of the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party, March 2013.
FILE - Egyptian anti-riot soldiers stand guard in front of a destroyed banner of the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party, March 2013.

An Egyptian court on Saturday dissolved the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), the political wing of the banned Muslim Brotherhood, dealing a crippling blow in the campaign to crush Egypt's oldest Islamist movement.

A court banned the Muslim Brotherhood itself in September, but that ruling did not mention its political wing, leaving open the possibility it could be allowed to run in parliamentary elections, due late this year.

Saturday's supreme administrative court ruling excludes the Brotherhood from formal participation in electoral politics, potentially forcing the movement underground, particularly as it has lost the sympathy of large swathes of the public.

The court's ruling called for the FJP to be dissolved and its assets seized by the state. Its decision is final and cannot be appealed, a judicial source said.

The FJP's lawyer called the ruling political and said it was unconstitutional to deprive the defense of the right to appeal. "The legal reasons given do not justify this ruling but this is a political decision to get rid, not just of the Freedom and Justice Party, but of all the parties that were established after the revolution of January 25, 2011," lawyer Mahmoud Abou al-Aynayn told Reuters.

"I expect other parties to be dissolved too." The Muslim Brotherhood, once Egypt's oldest, best organized and most successful political movement, has seen hundreds of its members killed and thousands detained since then-army chief Abdel Fattah el-Sissi overthrew elected president and Brotherhood member Mohamed Morsi 13 months ago, following weeks of protest.

Morsi, who ruled for a year, and other Brotherhood officials were rounded up in the wake of his ousting and hundreds have been sentenced to death in mass court rulings that have drawn criticism from Western governments and human rights groups.

Sissi, who went on to win a presidential election in May, vowed during his campaign the Brotherhood would cease to exist under his rule.


The FJP was established in June 2011, in the aftermath of the uprising that removed Hosni Mubarak from power after 30 years and inspired hopes for more pluralistic politics in Egypt.

It went on to win parliamentary and presidential elections, but many Egyptians became disillusioned with Morsi after he gave himself sweeping powers and mismanaged the economy, taking to the streets in protest and prompting the army move against him.

But the leading lights of the 2011 uprising, many of them secular youth activists, have also found themselves on the wrong side of the new political leadership, many of them receiving long sentences for breaching a new anti-protest law by taking part in small and peaceful gatherings.

The government accuses the Brotherhood of inciting violence and terrorism. Egypt's state and private media now portray the Brotherhood as a terrorist group and an enemy of the state.

The Brotherhood maintains it is a peaceful movement but attacks by militants have risen since the army overthrew Morsi.

Most of the violence has taken place in the Sinai Peninsula near the border with Israel and the Hamas-run Gaza Strip. The army has responded with air and ground attacks.

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Comment Sorting
by: Mark from: San Diego
August 10, 2014 7:30 AM
The Muslim Brotherhood is a terrorist organization through and through. Their use of the political process and participation in humanitarian activities lulled the populous to elect them, but remember--their slogan is "jihad is our way and death for the sake of Allah is our wish". This goal cannot rule any democratic, inclusive society. The Muslim Brotherhood writings espouse the elimination of Israel, and the subjugation of all under Islam and sharia law. They indoctrinate their youth in this same mindset--hatred toward Jews, intolerance toward other non-Muslims, and violence as a means to accomplish religious goals.

As a Christian, I constantly ask myself "Why are the many leaders of Islam not taking a stand against these violent groups". As I study the Koran, the Hadith, The Life of Mohammed, and other Islamic texts, I am realizing that Islam actually does teach this violent, expansionist, doctrine.

We need the Imam's--the Muslim leaders--to renounce violence and to promote the ideology of Islam coexisting peacefully with other religions as EQUALS and as a faith that can thrive under the authority of secular governments. The violent methods used by Mohammed to conquer people groups in the name of Islam long ago must be renounced in contemporary society rather than held up as a model dignified and encouraged by Allah. A resolution to Islamic terrorism needs to come from a change of heart within the teachers of Islam and the LOUD voice of those teachers who do not support it.

by: Ali baba from: new york
August 09, 2014 6:57 PM
Muslim brotherhood is a terrorist organization and it has to be dissolve . This is a dirty organization that manipulate the economic crisis and developed riots in Egypt. they called a revolution but in fact it is conspiracy . They using money to bribe a gang of young people to stir trouble. they used deception and liar until they are able to seize power. then Egyptian Experience a nightmare. Christian had prosecuted. they kidnapped girls in the day light. . They use monopoly and only member of Muslim brotherhood is taking charge. The Egyptian revolt and thrown away . they started terrorist attacks and target police officers and Christian. they are using internet and some web page like face book and YouTube to spread hate message. the decision of the court is the right step to restore stability in the country .

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