News / Middle East

Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood Calls for More Rallies After Bloodshed

An woman with blood on her clothes screams during clashes between security forces and supporters of Egypt's ousted President  Morsi in Ramses Square, in downtown Cairo, Aug. 16, 2013.
An woman with blood on her clothes screams during clashes between security forces and supporters of Egypt's ousted President Morsi in Ramses Square, in downtown Cairo, Aug. 16, 2013.
Edward Yeranian
Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood says it will continue holding defiant protests, following violent clashes that killed about 100 people on Friday.

Brotherhood officials are urging the group's supporters to march in the coming days until ousted president Mohamed Morsi is reinstated.

On Friday, chaos descended on Egypt and its capital, Cairo, where Morsi supporters emerged from midday prayers to hold a "Day of Rage."

Health officials said most of the victims died in and around Cairo's Ramses Square.  Witnesses said they saw many bodies laid out in mosques that have become makeshift morgues.  Several policemen were among the dead.

Clashes also were reported in Alexandria, Fayoum, Suez, Ismailia, Tanta and El Arish. 

Scattered clashes and skirmishes between Muslim Brotherhood supporters and police broke out Friday after thousands of supporters of the group marched in several locations across Egypt.

Fierce fighting between demonstrators and military forces in Cairo's Ramses Square has left dozens of people dead. Military helicopters hovered overhead. Witnesses told al-Jazerra television that there was firing from the helicopters on demonstrators in the square.

Near Ramses Square, fire engulfed the building that houses a construction company. It was not clear how the fire started.

The office of Egypt's interim president said he would hold a news conference on Saturday to talk about the latest developments.

Arab satellite channels showed Brotherhood supporters firing automatic weapons at targets beneath a main bridge in the Cairo district of Zamalek. Some witnesses said the protesters were firing at police while others said they were firing at residents of the area.

Retired Egyptian General Hossam Suweillam told al-Arabiya TV that the Brotherhood was “committing acts of terrorism,” saying that it has a “long history of violence.”

  • Armed Egyptian policeman moves into position in front of al-Fath mosque on Ramses Square in Cairo, August 17, 2013.
  • Policemen stand guard inside a room of the al-Fath mosque when supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi exchanged gunfire with security forces inside the mosque in Cairo, Aug.t 17, 2013
  • Anti-Mursi protesters and riot police officers gather outside al-Fath mosque at Ramses Square in Cairo, August 17, 2013.
  • A police officer takes position during clashes with supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi inside a room of al-Fath mosque in Cairo, August 17, 2013.
  • A member of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporter of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shouts slogans after he is injured in front Azbkya police station during clashes at Ramses Square, Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • Egyptians lay on the ground after being injured during clashes between security forces and supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi in Ramses Square, Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi gather in Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • A supporter of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shouts slogans during a protest outside Al-Fath Mosque in Ramses Square, Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi shout slogans and wave Egyptian flags during a protest outside Al-Fath Mosque in Ramses Square, in Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Morsi carry a coffin, covered with a national flag, of a protester who was killed during Wednesday' clashes in Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi take part in a protest near Ennour Mosque, Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • A soldier holds his weapon as he stands on an armored personnel carrier positioned outside the state-run television station in Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • Egyptian army soldiers take their positions at an entrance to Tahrir Square, Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • A man who lost relatives in recent violence stands near a list of names of dead members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi at El Eyman mosque in Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • A man walks through debris from what is left of burned vehicles outside the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, Cairo, August 16, 2013.
  • Abandoned shoes and a tea glass, belonging to supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, remain on a wall outside the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, Cairo, August 16, 2013.

A top Islamic cleric delivered a Friday prayer sermon on state TV, calling on all Egyptians to eschew violence and for political leaders to sit down at the negotiating table:

He warned Egyptians against sectarian strife and asked them to refrain from bloodshed and of  the taking of innocent lives.

Egyptian state media warned people to stay off the streets in Cairo as an operation to confront what it calls "terrorist elements" unfolds. Witnesses reported hearing crackles of gunfire in several areas of Cairo.

Arab satellite channels reported that at least a dozen police stations were attacked and police and army conscripts were killed in Cairo and several provincial cities.

Heba Morayef, an official with Human Rights Watch, said that the use of live ammunition by police was not acceptable and urged forces to use restraint.

Morayef urged police to take a number of steps to forestall further violence, especially against churches and Egypt's Christian minority, which were reportedly targeted this week by Brotherhood mobs.

“The other thing we want to see from the police is effective intervention to protect churches because over the last few days more than 30 churches were attacked around the country. And that is a clear obligation on the part of the police. They could have predicted that this would happen, that there would be a sectarian backlash in particular after weeks of sectarian discourse on the part of the Muslim Brotherhood and their supporters from the two sit-ins,” he said.

An Egyptian satellite channel showed images of a church in Cairo's Shubra district being torched Friday evening, after a government curfew was to have gone into effect. There were no indications that the unrest would subside despite the curfew.

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Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
by: sameh from: Egypt
August 19, 2013 4:38 AM
the pharaoh has came back to Egypt .when we see protesters killed in street you can say the pharaoh has came back.when you can see children and old-men killed and their blood cover them you can say the pharaoh has came back.when Egyptian people killed and arrested because of their opinion or form you can say the pharaoh has came back.

by: Lemon Tree from: Korea
August 17, 2013 10:03 AM
Stop that violence please. That is not good for everyone in the world. This will do more harm than good for you. Do you like violence? Of course not. People says they want peace, but they are just saying so. Understanding is mightier than the weapons.

by: Nasr Shalash from: Egypt
August 17, 2013 6:18 AM
Who Stay in the RABHA square for more than 40 days for no reason, except to make problems for the people living in this area, affecting the traffic, the Environment and storing polites and guns, to kill the others, they want Morsy to be back, but all the Egyptians does not need Morsy to continue, when the police released the people from this area they found Guns, pompas, and other webbins, yes Morsy came through the voting box, but he failed to achieve the Egyptians needs, no security, Echnomical issues became very bad, factories are closed, things became worse, people in millions (33 Milions) go to the roads on June 30th that they don't need Morsy any more, Why the USA interfere in Egypt Affairs, Obama commented that we came back to the Emergency law, meanwhile USA has GOWANTANAMO, and terrorisim law which is more dangrous than our Emergency law, Did Obam saw the Moslim Brothers when they burned the churchs, when the shooted the houses from the bridges, when they attacked the Police centres, when they attacked the Police officers, is this radical group or not, Egypt has stopped the USA project for the Big middle East, the USA is worry about Egypt why they was not worry about what they did in Iraq, Lybia, And Syria, USA want to get the middle East Back for 100 years by putting the Moslim brothers groups on the top of the Authority in Egypt, they are ignorant and radical group, one year has revealed that they are ignorant people, the problem is why USA trust them to be in a good relation with Israeil and to stop attcking USA through AL KHADA, this is not true, that they consider the Israeilians and the Christians are unbelievers and they want to build their Empire and to be strong enough, to attack them in the future, they are not honest people, UAS and Mr. Obama Has to stop interfere in the Egypt Affair, and to leave Egypt for the Egyptians

by: Mhey from: Philippines
August 17, 2013 2:47 AM
Bring those peace keeper in Egypt

by: mohamed saliq from: egypt
August 17, 2013 12:25 AM
i strongly support brotherhood bcoz egyption people elected Mr. mursi . the egyption army is killed our people without make any problem ,
@hager ,
who is telling you they didnt represent islam then who is represent is please clarify ?

all egyptions hate now egyption army ...

they killed our brothers and sisters ...

by: hager from: egypt
August 16, 2013 5:41 PM
i am egyption and i support our army , all the egyption are fighting terrorism , we are against the brotherhood . they didnot represent our religion islam . they want to kill us .
In Response

by: islamphobia_alert from: usa
August 17, 2013 12:46 AM
so if you are Egyptian does not mean yo uare not biased. you are biased and looks like you are lying.
army and thugs have arms and business and they will loose lot of it in a democracy. they don't want to loose what they had for decades.
only MB is an organized political power that can challenge them.
now the rest of the population has joined with MB to protest the military pharaoh's

by: Malek Towghi, Ph.D. from: Michigan, USA
August 16, 2013 4:16 PM
Before it is too late, General Sisi along with his fellow Generals and his puppet 'President' and 'Prime Minister' must be taken to the international Court of Justice at the Hague ... and tried for their horrible crimes against humanity. This mad Egyptian General has killed and lethally injured more within less than a week than General Umar Bashir of Sudan and Rodovan Karazdic and Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia had done throughout their career. Will some countries, human rights institutions and concerned individuals, please, initiate the case against Sisi & Co. in the ICJ at the Hague?

Obviously, we cannot expect the hypocrisy-ridden Islamic-
Arab world to take such a step. For the heroic but helpless people of Egypt, help in this form may come only from the 'heathendom' including India and Israel -- particularly Scandinavia.
In Response

by: mohammad from: america
August 17, 2013 12:39 AM
these military rulers control 40% of business in Egypt. they are not going to give up that easily. we can clearly see that MB has majority support. even with their leaders jailed. people are coming out in majority of provinces in large numbers that shows that people want military and police to do their job and not kill innocent civilians protesting the coup
In Response

by: mohamed saliq from: qatar
August 17, 2013 12:35 AM
dear brother ,
do you like the same situvation in newyork ?
what you will take decision in this time you will support elected president or army you will support .
mursi he is a very nice person in politics , he never make any curroption and also he grow up egypt .. it is very bad game is runing over their ..
In Response

by: ali baba from: new york
August 16, 2013 5:09 PM
general sisi has not commit any crime. . he is honest man .he did for the sake of Egypt. those who should international court is the Sudan leader and moersi in Egypt .once they ask him to step down. He should go peacefully ask his people to accept the reality .but they revolt and when people killed ,they cry like woman .it is their fault

by: Bilal from: Pakistan
August 16, 2013 2:43 PM
The situation at Egypt is not at all appreciable. It’s the same state Pakistan passed through when Gen Zia (late) exiled Z.A Bhutto & his govt. Then Z.A Bhutto was hanged by judiciary as only one of the two could survive. PML-N top leadership comes out of that hypocrisy. Before their situation gets as worse as Pakistan, Egyptian military needs to wake up & re-instate Morsy on Egyptian President’s seat & get out of politics, as politics may be a game in Pakistan but not in Egypt.

by: alhassan fofanah from: luanda angola
August 16, 2013 12:25 PM
the world is looking Egypt ,us again this will do more harm than good for you.

by: Godwin from: Nigeria
August 16, 2013 10:39 AM
Obama says traditional cooperation cannot continue when civilians are being killed in the streets. Meddlesome USA is asking Egypt to rescind the state of emergency imposed after the Muslim Brotherhood inflicted mayhem on the streets of Egypt to spite the army. Disturbing as this is, can someone please tell Obama that the presidency of the most powerful diplomatic nation in the world does not mean to dictate for other countries how to run their internal affairs. Egypt is struggling with domestic troubles occasioned by Muslim Brotherhood’s failure to navigate the country to true democracy after Egypt sacrificed so much in 2011 to obtain one. In an effort to correct the errors made by projecting the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt has voted for another revolution, and the MB refuses to yield ground for the country to move forward. Must Egypt remain in a stalemate all through? The army moved to prevent another colonization of the country by MB terrorists; does that give Obama the right to decide how Egypt goes about its internal governance?

The US narrowly escaped losing out in the region by glibly refusing to name the second Egyptian revolution a military coup. Now it is inching close to getting it wrong, which will terminate whatever gains it has made in the region over the years. If it succeeds in making a wrong move, it will be surprised to find out how many countries are waiting in the wings to take over from it. Aren’t you surprised how quiet Russia and China are over the matter in Egypt. Look at Israel’s frustration in the so-called peace negotiations with the Palestinians. The stagnation in Egypt pays no benefit to the country, and it is not gain saying the leadership of the MB put the people in front to die while they continue to play in safety far from battlefields. Obama’s comments are all about rhetoric and nothing better. Look at his many Red Lines ultimatum and underline what a president is made of. He could as well stop the slush funds to Egypt and Israel and be the president that chatted a new direction for American diplomacy of shedding much load and let’s see how the coat of more allies fits such power competitors as Russia, China and Iran.
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