News / Africa

Ghana's President John Atta Mills Dead at 68

Ghana's President John Evans Atta Mills.
Ghana's President John Evans Atta Mills.
Anne Look

DAKAR — Ghana's president, John Atta Mills, died Tuesday at a military hospital in Accra shortly after falling ill.  Officials did not give a cause of death.  Vice President John Dramani Mahama was sworn in to finish Mills's term.  

President John Atta Mills died five months short of finishing his first term in office and only days after celebrating his 68th birthday.  He was set to run for a second term in elections planned for December 7.  His death has taken the nation by surprise.

Shopkeeper Teresa Ayerakwo closed her shop early on Tuesday.  "In fact, today I am sad.  I won't eat today.  Never.  My husband is dead, but today's death is very, very paining for me.  He is a Christian.  He was nice to everybody, how he speak, he's very gentle, you see, and he care for us.  I don't think I can vote again.  Never.  Very painful for me," she said. 
 

  • Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, center, pays her respects after signing the guest book for Ghana's late President John Atta Mills' funeral in Accra, Ghana, August 10, 2012.
  • People walk to pay tribute to late President John Atta Mills at the parliament in Accra, Ghana, August 9, 2012.
  • A hearse carries the body of late President John Atta Mills to the parliament in Accra, Ghana, August 8, 2012.
  • Ghana's President John Dramani Mahama (C) arrives for the beginning of the three days of funeral ceremonies for late President John Atta Mills, Accra, Ghana, August 8, 2012.
  • Ghana President John Atta Mills attends the Chicago Council's Symposium on Global Agriculture and Food Security at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, May 18, 2012.
  • US President Barack Obama sits with Ghana's President John Atta Mills, right, and President Yayi Boni of Benin during a luncheon on Food Security at the G-8 Summit at Camp David, May 19, 2012.
  • John Atta Mills visits the floor of the New York Stock Exchange and talks with specialist Jennifer Klesaris December 15, 2011.
  • Ghana's President John Atta Mills, right, gestures as he speaks after being sworn in as the country's new president during a ceremony in Accra, Ghana, January 7, 2009.
  • John Atta Mills after he won the presidency of Ghana, January 3, 2009.
Mills was elected president in 2009, following a close runoff election that was praised by observers as a free, fair and peaceful transition of power.  It was his third and only successful bid for the presidency. 

The Ghanaian leader reiterated his commitment to political stability during a visit with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in March. 

"We have an election this year, but we are going to ensure there is peace before, during and after.  When there is no peace, it is not the leaders who suffer, it is the ordinary people who have elected us into office.  So we have a big challenge, and we know that some of our friends in Africa are looking up to us, and we dare not fail them," he said. 

Watch VOA's Shaka Ssali's '09 interview with President Mills


During the past two years, Mills presided over one of the fastest growing economies in the world.  But he faced some criticism that Ghana's economic boom has yet to include average citizens who face high rates of unemployment and poverty. 


Supporters like Efua Mensima say they are sad Mills will not be able to finish what he started.

"I miss him, I miss him.  I miss him personally and I miss his visions for Ghana.  I miss what he lived for, for everybody to create an enabling environment; for everybody to work, earn a living; for everybody to get free access to education, to health, to social activities like recreation and, well, for everybody to live and enjoy as a human," he said. 

A distinguished law professor and taxation expert, Mills taught at the University of Ghana for more than 25 years.

He served in various financial posts in government before taking on the role of vice president from 1997 to 2000 under Ghana's military dictator and later elected president, J.J. Rawlings.

Mills was known to be a soft-spoken politician, a devout Christian and an avid hockey player.

Laura Burke contributed reporting from Cape Coast, Ghana.
 

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Comments page of 2
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by: Kobby Danzerl-Amedson from: Accra, Ghana
July 25, 2012 4:30 AM
We fail to notice a hero and good leader when his is alive. Its only after his/her death that we begin to understand his philosophy and ideals he stood for. I never enjoyed politics but can confidently say, that President Mills was the most selfless leader Ghana ever had. Nkrumah was over-ambitious about Africa but Mills over-ambition was for his nation, Ghana and its people.

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
July 25, 2012 3:43 AM
I mourn the untimely death of sitting presitent of Ghana. I understand he was surely a faithful politician when I watched him speaking gently.

by: Jah Crucial from: Accra
July 24, 2012 11:54 PM
It is rather unfortunate that we lost him, he was a good man, but Ghanaians must use this medium to crave for a better leadership so far as their econo-political issues are concerned. RIP Mr President, Damirifa.
In Response

by: jamal from: tamale
July 25, 2012 2:38 PM
I mourn the untimely death of sitting presitent of Ghana. I understand he was surely a faithful politician when I watched him speaking gently.
may he rest in perfect peace ..?

by: Edward John from: Liberia
July 24, 2012 6:13 PM
Africa has lost another Legend, i think this is a sad day for us as Africans as we morn the death of such an icon,, my condolence goes out to all Ghanian especially the Family of the professor.

by: oko burgesson from: atomic hill estates,accra
July 24, 2012 4:42 PM
what a shock for ghanaians. may his soul rest in peace and God bless Ghana

by: clifford from: hackensack,nj
July 24, 2012 4:39 PM
president mills RIP, you are gone but not forgotten

by: lois from: accra
July 24, 2012 2:42 PM
actually, when he was president, other politicians took advantage of his illness to steal money.i'm sure he'll have more peace dead than when he was alive.

by: samuel from: Lashibi
July 24, 2012 2:22 PM
the presidents death is an untimely one.He was very useful to Ghana very much irespectful of the bad comments people give about him.GOD KNOWS BEST

by: Lartey from: Accra
July 24, 2012 1:50 PM
He was a great president Ghana and the whole of Africa has lost.He took our presidency to a higher level.He will be missed greatly.
In Response

by: mary from: uganda
July 25, 2012 3:03 AM
What a loss, we the people of Africa will surely miss him. He was a role model not only to the people of Ghana but to the entire African Continent. I pray that other leaders will emulate him, a man of integrity, humility and God fearing. To me i looked at him as the King David of this generation. May God strengthen the people of Ghana and bring you a better leader....
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