News / Middle East

Iran Implicitly Confirms Attack on US Drone

Iranian Defense Minister Ahmad Vahidi (February 2011 file photo)
Iranian Defense Minister Ahmad Vahidi (February 2011 file photo)
VOA News
Iran has confirmed a Pentagon report that two Iranian warplanes fired on an unarmed U.S. drone in the Persian Gulf last week.

Defense Minister Ahmad Vahidi was quoted on the Iranian Students' News Organization website as saying that Iran's armed forces took action against an anonymous plane that entered the country's airspace - countering the Pentagon's contention that the U.S. aircraft was over international waters.  

Iran also vowed to confront any other aircraft that enters its airspace. According to FARS news agency, Iranian Revolutionary Guard General Massoud Jazayeri said Iran would "give a decisive response to any aerial, ground or sea aggression."

US pondering response

Pentagon spokesman George Little said Thursday that the unmanned Predator was outside Iranian waters on a routine classified surveillance mission on November 1 when an Iranian military plane fired at, and missed, the drone.

Little says the United States informed Iran that it is prepared to safeguard its forces and will continue surveillance operations over the Persian Gulf in line with the U.S. commitment to security in the region. He said the U.S. is not ruling out either a military or diplomatic response.

Though the U.S. routinely conducts surveillance missions over to Iran to check on nuclear facilities and other sites, the Pentagon says this is the first time Iran has fired on one of its drones. Iran says it shot down an American unmanned aerial vehicle last year over Iranian territory. U.S. officials say that aircraft landed unintentionally.

The Pentagon usually does not comment on classified missions. Little said the report of the attack on the drone was leaked.

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by: Jeffrey from: USA
November 09, 2012 8:45 AM
This headline is clearly provocative to get the US into a war with Iran. There is nothing implicit about not confirming a statement. Its not! This should be retracted and a more accurate one put in its place. This is very poor journalism.
In Response

by: Caz from: USA
November 09, 2012 5:24 PM
Right, seems every major news media outlet is screaming war now that the elections are over.

by: Snake Eyes from: New York
November 09, 2012 8:41 AM
Headline "Iran Implicitly Confirms Attack on U.S. Drone".
Six lines into the article, "Iranian Revolutionary Guard General Massoud Jazayeri did not explicitly confirm the incident in his comments to the FARS news agency on Friday".......
Sensationalist headlines = weak reporting

by: Malbgood from: Florida
November 09, 2012 8:23 AM
So "Iran Implicitly Confirms Attack..." or "...did not explicitly confirm the incident..."?

by: Chris from: USA
November 09, 2012 8:21 AM
Not surprising they are getting trigger happy with all the retoric and warmongering by is it?
Be prepared for the consequences.
Far from being an ally in the Mid East.
I sugest Israel is a liability and embarrassment.
What is the US doing there anyway 'testing' their defenses?
so what did they expect?
Is the US Military spoiling for another useless fight at taxpayers expense?
The last 2 fiascos have now been responsible for the greatest threat to the US - its burgeoning debt!!
In Response

by: Eric from: USAF
November 09, 2012 5:52 PM
Is the US Military spoiling for another useless fight at taxpayers expense?
You speak of the US Military as though they were foreigners. They are the sons and daughters, mothers and fathers of this nation. They are taxpayers who chose to serve. They arent rattling the swords. They operate under the orders of the Secretary of Defense who receives his orders from the Commander In Chief. You know who that is don't you. I'll help you His name is Barry Obama. Rest assured the patriots of this country are not spending your tax dollar. Your government is. Now come out of the basement and have mom make you a bowl of hot soup. She should be in from work by now.
In Response

by: dirty sanchez from: u.s.a
November 09, 2012 4:59 PM
Idiot! the u.s also has the right to protect it's people and military in the region. get over yourself. when iran has a bad day we or isreal have to pay for it with your kinds rhetorical crap. stop threatening the world as the persians love to do and remember jerk. america is here to stay. you can work with us or you can play your hate games. we will answer your hate.

by: Rex from: Pittsburgh
November 09, 2012 8:07 AM
This is a big embarrassment to the Iranian Military.
2 of their (highly trained) Jet jockey’s were unable to shoot down an unarmed propeller driven drone!
If I were their commander they would be in the motor pool for the rest of their lives.
Nobody in the media is picking up on this!
In Response

by: Shade from: Pensacola
November 09, 2012 11:45 PM
While I agree with you on there lack of any kind of actual ability to hit the broad side of a barn. Lets be clear on one thing, there are no propeller's on my predator. A camera, definitely, a missile to shove in there eye sockets sometimes but a propeller... it's jet propelled. You want a propeller, they have them on these awesome little hats they sell at amusement parks. Probably one in your closet right now ;)
In Response

by: Caz from: USA
November 09, 2012 5:37 PM
Let's be clear, the unmanned drone was reported to be over international air space by the US. This maybe just political positioning by Iran to set a precedence for drone warfare. If the US does indeed claim it is an act of war, then drone usage in other countries have a strong case of being limited to surveillance outside of said countries airspace. If the US does not claim it as an act of war, countries will begin to fire upon UAV's , armed or not, whenever they feel like it.

So, it seems to me this is not about Iran's ability to shoot down UAV's, this to me is more about what countries can do to "hostile" UAV's when no formal declaration of war is made.

I'm sure afterwords we will begin to see the real capabilities of both drones and human pilots after political rules are beginning to take shape.
In Response

by: Jason from: USA
November 09, 2012 5:21 PM
You really think fighter planes that can and did take laps around the predator couldn't bring it down if they had chosen to. Heck they could probably slow down to that speed, fly alongside it and shoot it with a BB gun. You must be really gullible if you are unable to read between the propaganda and come to the conclusion this was meant as warning shots and not to awaken a giant by shooting down its plane.
In Response

by: littlelizard25 from: usa
November 09, 2012 5:12 PM
The aircraft were reported to be SU-25s. If so they are basically ground attack aircraft first put in service in the late 70s to early 80s. To get an accurate shot they would have to slow to almost stall speed. Very hard to do. US pilots are trained to do things like that, but doubt Iranian pilots are. Still even at that, if they were trying to shoot it down,and after at least 2 gun runs still failed, doesn't say much for thier training.

by: D. Hurd from: NC
November 09, 2012 8:04 AM
Go Iran, GO!
In Response

by: nooshafarin from: california
November 09, 2012 11:52 PM
Salam Azizam! Go iran! I say too.
In Response

by: kamikrazee from: USA
November 09, 2012 5:09 PM
Yes. Go. Somewhere, anywhere.

That country is in desperate straits to thump their chests having fired at a remote controlled surveillance vehicle. The Iranian people are even more desperate to believe this nonsense.
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