News / Middle East

Israeli Airstrike Kills Palestinian in Gaza

Palestinian relatives of Haitham Mishal, 29, react during his funeral in the Shati Refugee Camp in Gaza City, April 30, 2013.
Palestinian relatives of Haitham Mishal, 29, react during his funeral in the Shati Refugee Camp in Gaza City, April 30, 2013.
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Scott Bobb
— An Israeli air strike has killed a Palestinian man in the Gaza Strip, the first deadly air strike in the Palestinian territory since a truce five months ago ended eight days of fighting that killed more than 100 people.

Israeli Defense Forces say the airstrike Tuesday targeted Haitham Mishal, a Gaza resident who they said was a member of the Islamist militant group Mujahideen Shura Council of Jerusalem.

A spokesman for the Gaza Health Ministry said he was a policeman.

The Israeli announcement said Mishal played a role in the rockets fired two weeks ago from Egypt's Sinai Desert that hit the southern Israeli city of Eilat. There were no casualties.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel would respond to any attacks.

He said the strike is a continuation of Israeli policy of refusing to accept the sporadic firing of rockets either from Gaza or the Sinai.

A dozen rockets fired by militants in Gaza have landed in southern Israel in recent weeks without causing any casualties.

Islamic militants have become active in the Sinai since security deteriorated there following the fall of former President Hosni Mubarak.

Israel says many of the militants in Sinai have infiltrated from Gaza.

Israel accuses the Hamas movement that controls Gaza of responsibility for the activities of all these groups.

A Hamas spokesman called the attack a dangerous and unjustified escalation.

The airstrike in Gaza came amid rising tensions in the West Bank.

Israeli settler Eviatar Borovsky was stabbed to death Tuesday by a Palestinian man near the Palestinian city of Nablus.

Israeli Police Commander Yaakov Shabtai said the Palestinian, Salam Assad al-Zaghal, subsequently grabbed a gun and began firing.

Shabtai said two policemen positioned nearby opened fire and wounded the attacker who was taken to a nearby Israeli hospital.

He said Israeli security forces were investigating, but initial indications were that the suspect acted alone.

It was the first killing of an Israeli by a Palestinian in the West Bank in a year-and-a-half. Nine Palestinians have been killed in clashes with Israeli security forces in the West Bank since the beginning of the year.

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by: Robin from Orlando from: Orlando
May 01, 2013 3:11 AM
Mashal dealt in arms, and not only provide the rocket shot at Eilat, but was also involve in the carrying out of the attack.

First killing in a year and a half...but not for lack of trying.

Indeed, since September 2011 there have, fortunately, been no fatalities as a result of terror attacks in Judea and Samaria, but that is not through want of trying, as the family of Adele Biton – who is still fighting for her life after the stone-throwing attack on her mother’s car in March – is only too aware.

In March 2013 the Israel Security Agency reported 101 terror attacks in Judea and Samaria. In February, 100 attacks – 84 of those fire-bombings. January 2013 saw 56 terror attacks in Judea and Samaria, including thestabbing of a teenager at the same Tapuach Junction. In December 2012 eighty-one terror attacks took place in Judea and Samaria and in November 2012 there were 122 attacks.

That means that in the one hundred and fifty-one days from the beginning of November 2012 until the end of March 2013, four hundred and sixty terror attacks took place in Judea and Samaria. That is an average of over three a day.

Quoted from http://tinyurl.com/codhrgz


by: sujaye from: us
April 30, 2013 10:36 PM
What biased and slanted reporting!! You write"A dozen rockets fired by militants in Gaza have landed in southern Israel in recent weeks without causing any casualties" What the hell does that mean?? That's it's OK to try to kill innocent people? That precision killing was completely justified.Your support for jihad is disgusting!.


by: chipmunk from: ny
April 30, 2013 2:44 PM
I don't understand why so many newspapers reported that a terrorist and a settler/civilian were killed, yet media has shown images of the terrorists family crying (next time choose a different career, moron)I have yet to see a single pic of the innocent civilians family crying!!
Why are you sending your readers emotionally powerful images in sympathy of the terrorist? When Boston bombings happened did you write front cover "breaking news bombing at boston marathon" with pic of bombers mother crying????
Its not because ur stupid. I know u sympathize with victims, not perp. Except if victim is Jewish/Israeli........


by: BJP from: India
April 30, 2013 12:42 PM
that is the point with Israel... if you attack them - they never forget!! you are dead no matter how long you ran or how far or how deep you bury yourself... they will find you... we ought to adopt that strategy


by: USMC from: USA
April 30, 2013 12:23 PM
Israeli precision is legendary... respect!!!
Israel, USMC salute you with the pride of close association

Semper Fi!!!


by: Anonymous
April 30, 2013 12:10 PM
Where has the media gone?!?! The headlines for this page should be: 'Sinai Desert Militant that shot 2 rockets into southern Israel killed!' And tell those women on the picture its too late to cry now! They should of cried to him not to shoot rockets!!!

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