News / Middle East

At Least 15 Dead as Israel Strikes Gaza Market

Gazans in Shelled School Sought Shelteri
X
Scott Bobb
July 30, 2014 8:16 PM
Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
VIDEO: Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
VOA News

At least 15 Palestinians were killed during an Israeli military strike near a crowded market in Shejaia on Wednesday, Gaza health ministry spokesman Ashraf al-Qidra said. He said 160 people were also wounded.

The news came after Israel announced a brief, four-hour cease-fire which began at 1200 GMT (3:00 p.m. local time) and appeared not to last. The Israeli military added that areas where troops were "currently operating" would be exempt.

Hamas denounced the pause as having "no value" and continued to fire rockets, saying it would fight on its own terms, not Israel’s, CNN reported from the scene.

According to the Israeli Defense Force, Hamas fired 26 rockets at Israel, two of which were intercepted above Ashkelon and Netivot. IDF said since midnight 84 rockets had been fired at Israel.

Witnesses reported seeing black smoke billowing above the Shejaia neighborhood after intense shelling. Video footage broadcast by Hamas broadcast outlet Al Aqsa showed dead bodies in pools of blood and wounded people being evacuated by residents.

A Palestinian journalist was reportedly among the dead.

An Israeli military spokeswoman said she was checking the report.

  • A laborer tends a watermelon field as tanks are stationed near the border with Gaza, July 30, 2014. 
  • Palestinians look at donkeys that were killed by an Israeli strike earlier in the day at the adjacent Abu Hussein U.N. school seen in background, in Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, July 30, 2014. 
  • Israeli army tanks and armored vehicles are seen in Gaza near the border with Israel, July 30, 2014. 
  • Smoke and fire from the explosion of an Israeli strike rise over Gaza City amid Israel's heaviest air and artillery assault in more than three weeks of Israel-Hamas fighting, July 30, 2014. 
  • Israeli soldiers from the Golani Brigade stand in a circle at a staging area before entering Gaza from Israel, July 30, 2014. 
  • Palestinians carry bodies of 10 members of the Al Astal immediate and extended family that were killed by an Israeli strike on their homes, during their funeral in Khan Younis, southern Gaza Strip,  July 30, 2014. 
  • Israeli soldiers stand near the border with Gaza, July 30, 2014.
  • A Palestinian girl cries while receiving treatment for her injuries caused by an Israeli strike at a U.N. school in Jebaliya refugee camp, at the Kamal Adwan hospital in Beit Lahiya, northern Gaza Strip, July 30, 2014. 

UN school struck

Separately, a United Nations-run school in Gaza was shelled Wednesday.

The attack, which killed at least 15 and wounded more than 100 people, happened about 5:30 a.m. (0230 GMT) at the Jebaliya refugee camp in northern Gaza.

Several hours later, it remained a chaotic scene. Shelling had caved in a wall of the classroom harboring most of the victims. Blankets remained on the floor, along with traces of flesh and blood. In the courtyard, benches and chairs were scattered. So were the carcasses of several cows and donkeys killed in the attack.

A Palestinian girl carries belongings as she and her family leave the Abu Hussein U.N. school in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, hit by an Israeli strike earlier, July 30, 2014.A Palestinian girl carries belongings as she and her family leave the Abu Hussein U.N. school in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, hit by an Israeli strike earlier, July 30, 2014.
x
A Palestinian girl carries belongings as she and her family leave the Abu Hussein U.N. school in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, hit by an Israeli strike earlier, July 30, 2014.
A Palestinian girl carries belongings as she and her family leave the Abu Hussein U.N. school in the Jebaliya refugee camp, northern Gaza Strip, hit by an Israeli strike earlier, July 30, 2014.

People milled about in shock. Some questioned the rationale for seeking shelter away from home, after heeding Israeli warnings — by phone and leaflet — of pending airstrikes in their respective neighborhoods. If they aren’t safe at a U.N.-run school shelter, several said with resignation, they might as well go home to die.

United Nations Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson was emotional as he spoke about the attack which also injured more than 100 people, saying all indicators show Israeli artillery hit the school, killing at least 16 people who were sheltering there, including children.

The school is one of 85 sites where the U.N. agency for Palestinian refugees said more than 200,000 people are now seeking shelter. This site was so overcrowded that families had set up camp outside, using desks and chairs to define spaces. Daytime temperatures of at least 32 degrees Celsius, or 91 Fahrenheit, only added to the misery.

US condemnation

The United States condemned Israel's shelling of the school in some of the sharpest criticism Washington has leveled at Israel over the more than three weeks of fighting.

White House spokeswoman Bernadette Meehan said the U.S. is also "extremely concerned" that thousands of Palestinians aren't safe in U.N.-designated shelters in Gaza even though Israel's military has told them to evacuate their homes.

Meehan said the U.S. also condemns those responsible for hiding weapons in U.N. facilities in Gaza, adding that the escalation shows the need for a cease-fire as soon as possible.

Some Palestinians believe the outside world has abandoned them. Several people at the school expressed anger toward the international community and Arab leaders whom they say have provided little if any assistance.

The United States has pledged $47 million in humanitarian aid, including an initial $15 million to the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) in response to its recent urgent appeal. Other groups, such as the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, are delivering aid.

Early morning shelling

Overnight into Wednesday morning, Israel continued to bombard Gaza City with dozens of airstrikes and heavy tank shelling as the conflict between the Jewish state and Hamas entered its 23rd day.

At least 32 Palestinians in the Gaza Strip were killed early Wednesday as the Jewish state said it targeted Islamist militants at dozens of sites across the coastal enclave, health ministry spokesman Ashraf al-Kidra said.

Among the dead were a medic and an infant. An Israeli army spokeswoman said she was checking for details.

Eight people, including five members of the same family in Jebalya, were killed in other strikes, Gaza officials said.

Hospital officials put the total number of Palestinians killed in the conflict to at least 1,224, most of them civilians. On the Israeli side, 53 soldiers and three civilians have been killed since the Jewish state began its offensive July 8 to halt rocket salvoes fired by Gaza's dominant Hamas Islamists and their allies.

The Israeli security cabinet was to convene again Wednesday to assess the situation and consider future steps.

The army said it needed about a week to complete its main mission of destroying cross-border infiltration tunnels and there has been strong Israeli public support for holding course.

Israeli's military issued a statement saying it so far had hit 4,100 targets in Gaza, with a third of them involving Hamas militants' ability to attack Israel with rockets, the Associated Press reported Wednesday.

Cease-fire negotiations

Despite the soaring death toll, the militants will not cease fire until their demands are met, according to Hamas' military leader, Mohammed Deif. 

But Israel's Channel Two TV said progress was being made toward a deal in Cairo, where a Palestinian delegation was expected to arrive for discussions.

The West Bank-headquartered Palestine Liberation Organization, which has been at odds with Hamas for years, said it had garnered the Islamist movement's support for a 24-hour truce, but did not say when that was due to start.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas "was in touch with [Hamas chief Khaled] Meshaal Tuesday and Wednesday. He proposed the 24-hour truce, Meshaal and Hamas agreed," senior Palestinian official Nabil Shaath told AFP on Tuesday.

However, Hamas said so far it had not agreed to any new truce.

"When we have an Israeli commitment ... on a humanitarian truce, we will look into it but we will never declare a truce from our side while the occupation keeps killing our children," Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri said.

Israel's government had no comment on the proposal.

'Breaking point'

UNRWA, the main U.N. relief agency in Gaza, said it was at “breaking point” with more than 200,000 Palestinians sheltering in its schools and buildings following calls by Israel for civilians to evacuate whole neighborhoods before military operations.

The agency acknowledged that it had found a cache of rockets in one school but blamed no particular party. Instead, its spokesman, Chris Gunness, condemned "the group or groups who endangered civilians by placing these munitions in our school."

"This is yet another flagrant violation of the neutrality of our premises," Gunness said in a statement. "We call on all the warring parties to respect the inviolability of U.N. property.”

The Israeli assault intensified after the deaths of 10 soldiers in Palestinian cross-border attacks on Monday. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned of a long conflict ahead.

Some information for this report was provided by Reuters, AP and AFP. VOA correspondent Scott Bobb contributed reporting from Gaza City. VOA correspondent Margaret Besheer reported from the United Nations.

You May Like

Kurdish Party Pushes Political Gamble to Run in Turkey Poll

HDP announces it will run as political party instead of fielding independent candidates in June election, but faces tough 10 percent threshold More

Twitter Targets Islamic State

New research shows suspending Twitter accounts of Islamic State, its supporters has been effective; group, its backers are facing 'significant pressure,' says terrorism expert More

Video Former Sudan 'Lost Boy' Becomes Chess Master in NYC

Majur Juac made the leap from being a refugee in Africa to a master chess champion in US, where he shares his expertise with students More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
 Previous    
by: Korna Alumun from: Benue,Nigeria
July 30, 2014 8:56 AM
Hamas has to accept a basic fact..that Isreal has the capacity to cause more devastation.I understand there demands but right now they've lost there bargaining chips,at least not while this war is going on.Hamas has to seek for a safer way to confront Isreal concerning their demands.War is not the solution.War will only make matters worst.

In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
July 30, 2014 1:04 PM
Israel hasn't the "courage" to fight Hamas in a ground war, (and so they sit back in safety), and bombard and kill the innocent Palestinian civilians, because of their fear..... (The world is watching), and Israeli has lost that myth of invincibility, and Hamas is becoming legendary in the Arab world..... Hamas is fearless, and Israel lacks courage?... (and Israel can defeat the Palestinian civilians, but they fear and won't fight Hamas)..... and the legend grows?

In Response

by: william li from: canada
July 30, 2014 12:51 PM
you are wrong, Israel will eventually loss the war. How many innocent ppl can you kill? Those Palestinians they dont fear of death, you kill one and they have ten others to take the place of the dead. How many can you kill? Palestinians have the highest birth rate, their population is growing fast. They will use they blood and body to take over Israel. Its like america eventually has to retreat from Afghanistan because Talibans are not scared of death, they will keep fighting until the last drop of blood. take my advice, go to america all Jewish, build your country there in america!


by: Sunny Enwerem from: Lagos Nigeria
July 30, 2014 4:51 AM
Hamas brought this upon Gaza ,Israel must act against Hamas and its fellow fighters.

In Response

by: meanbill from: USA
July 30, 2014 10:55 PM
Hey Anonymous... The Israeli's use that excuse, (but the truth is), the Israeli's are "cowardly" hiding behind that excuse, because they are "scared to death" of taking on Hamas like real men do, in hand to hand combat in Gaza.... The whole world is watching the cowardice of the Israeli ground troops, that sit back in safety, and bombard the unarmed innocent Palestinians.... Israel will use every excuse in the world, rather than fight Hamas in combat...... REALLY

In Response

by: Anonymous
July 30, 2014 12:20 PM
It's sad that so many civilians are dying, but in the end Israel must do what is necessary to protect its own people. Whether or not Hamas' attacks on Israel are effective is irrelevant; they are still taking place and they have been for a long time. Anyone that hides behind civilians in an armed conflict is wrong for doing so. Right now that's what Hamas is doing, using the Hamas civilians as hostages to deface Israel. Furthermore, they are refusing to let aid in to help these civilians, because without them as a shield Hamas cannot continue the fight against Israel with even a small measure of success. At least that's how it seems to me.

In Response

by: Jon Hoober from: USA
July 30, 2014 8:29 AM
The Israeli military continually oppresses Gaza and Israeli settlers keep encroaching into Palestinian territory - what else do they have but to fight back?

Comments page of 2
 Previous    

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Super Bowl Ads Compete for Eyes on TV, Webi
X
January 29, 2015 9:58 AM
Super Bowl Sunday (Feb. 1) is about more than just the NFL's American football championship and big parties to watch the game. Viewers also tune in for the world famous commercials that send Facebook and Twitter abuzz. Daniela Schrier reports on the social media rewards for America’s priciest advertising.
Video

Video Super Bowl Ads Compete for Eyes on TV, Web

Super Bowl Sunday (Feb. 1) is about more than just the NFL's American football championship and big parties to watch the game. Viewers also tune in for the world famous commercials that send Facebook and Twitter abuzz. Daniela Schrier reports on the social media rewards for America’s priciest advertising.
Video

Video Theologians Cast Doubt on Morality of Drone Strikes

In 2006, stirred by photos of U.S. soldiers mistreating Iraqi prisoners, a group of American faith leaders and academics launched the National Religious Campaign Against Torture. It played an important role in getting Congress to investigate, and the president to ban, torture. VOA's Jerome Socolovsky reports.
Video

Video Freedom on Decline Worldwide, Report Says

The state of global freedom declined for the ninth consecutive year in 2014, according to global watchdog Freedom House's annual report released Wednesday. VOA's William Gallo has more.
Video

Video As Ground Shifts, Obama Reviews Middle East Strategy

The death of Saudi Arabia’s king, the collapse of a U.S.-friendly government in Yemen and a problematic relationship with Israel’s leadership are presenting a new set of complications for the Obama administration and its Middle East policy. Not only is the U.S. leader dealing with adversaries in Iran, the Islamic State and al-Qaida, but he is now juggling trouble with traditional allies, as White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Video

Video MRI Seems to Help Diagnose Prostate Cancer, Preliminary Study Shows

Just as with mammography used to detect breast cancer, there's a lot of controversy about tests used to diagnose prostate cancer. Fortunately, a new study shows doctors may now have a more reliable way to diagnose prostate cancer for high risk patients. More from VOA's Carol Pearson.
Video

Video Smartphones About to Make Leap, Carry Basic Senses

Long distance communication contains mostly sounds and pictures. For now. But scientists in Britain say they are close to creating additions for our smartphones that will make it possible to send taste, smell and even a basic touch. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video NASA Monitors Earth’s Vital Signs From Space

The U.S. space agency, NASA, is wrapping up its busiest 12-month period in more than a decade, with three missions launched in 2014 and two this month, one in early January and the fifth scheduled for January 29. As VOA’s Rosanne Skirble reports, the instruments being lifted into orbit are focused on Earth’s vital life support systems and how they are responding to a warmer planet.
Video

Video Saved By a Mistake - an Auschwitz Survivor's Story

Dagmar Lieblova was 14 when she arrived at Auschwitz in December 1943, along with her entire Czech Jewish family. All of them were to die there, but she was able to leave after several months due to a bureaucratic mix-up which saved her life. Now 85, with three children and six grandchildren, she says she has a feeling of victory. This report by Ahmad Wadiei and Farin Assemi, of RFE/RL's Radio Farda is narrated by RFE’s Raymond Furlong.

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More

All About America

AppleAndroid