News / Asia

US, Japan Protest China Air Defense Zone

Japanese Coast Guard vessels sail near a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan, Aug. 18, 2013.
Japanese Coast Guard vessels sail near a group of disputed islands called Diaoyu by China and Senkaku by Japan, Aug. 18, 2013.
VOA News
The United States has voiced its "strong concern" to China over threats from Beijing to enforce its claims to a set of disputed Pacific islands controlled by Japan but claimed by the People's Republic.
 
The White House, State Department and Pentagon all issued statements late Saturday, hours after Beijing threatened to take "defensive emergency measures" against aircraft entering its newly-proclaimed air defense zone. The Chinese edict called on all aircraft to identify themselves before entering the zone, and to obey all orders from Beijing.
 
The White House called the threat an escalatory development," while Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called it "a destabilizing attempt to alter the status quo" in the East China Sea. Hagel also said the United States has no plans to change how it conducts military operations in the region. 
 
The islands, known as Senkaku in Japan and Daioyu in China, are uninhabited, but surrounded by rich fishing grounds and potential energy deposits.
 
Earlier Saturday, Japan lodged a strong protest with Beijing that called establishment of the zone "totally unacceptable." Senior Japanese diplomat Junichi Ihara also criticized China for escalating bilateral tensions over the islands.
                                                                                                                       
In the Chinese statement, which appeared Saturday on a defense ministry website, Beijing said the new rules were effective immediately.
 
After months of escalating tensions, Japan scrambled fighter jets earlier this month over the East China Sea, after it spotted what it said was an unmanned aircraft flying toward Japan.
 
Japan annexed the islets in the late 19th century. China claimed sovereignty over the archipelago in 1971, saying ancient maps show it has been Chinese territory for centuries.
 
The festering China-Japan dispute is one of several maritime controversies pitting China against several Southeast Asian nations, including the Philippines, Vietnam, Brunei and Malaysia.
 
Beijing has indicated a willingness to negotiate the disputes, but has so far rejected calls for multilateral talks. It has sought separate negotiations with each country.
 
Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

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by: Zhuubaajie from: Hong Kong
November 24, 2013 1:30 PM
ADIZs are set up per DOMSESTIC laws, and there is no international law governing it. America deems its rights to fly spy planes actually over China, because it can. The so called "historical" defense zones by other countries around China were set up by thugs disrespecting China's rights. Beijing did not act because Beijing did not feel up to countering the thugs' muscle in prior years. Times have changed. There will be price to pay should any foreign power seek to interfere with China's internal laws - it is simple as that.

In Response

by: Zhuubaajie from: Hong Kong
November 26, 2013 3:24 AM
@Yoshi:

You are ignoring reality. The Diaoyus are no longer under Japanese administrative control (a "fact" you find so much importance in). Just this last week the Chinese marine administration officials boarded and inspected three foreign vessels in the relevant seas. Beijing is exercising as much control as Japan has ever had. That is the status quo.

If you don't think that works, China can cut off buying Japanese for another year or two and we can see how quickly Abenomics accelerates (to self destruct).

In Response

by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
November 24, 2013 11:17 PM
No country could draw its ADIZ line over other country's land just becasue ADIZ is the matter of domestic laws right as you say. Senkaku Islands are now controled by Japan, so that you China could never draw ADIZ line including the islands at present. You China should make diplomatic, patient efforts to accomplish solution of territorial dispute as Japan has been doing it over Hoppou Ryoudo territorial dispute with Russia.Thank you.


by: Joe from: USA
November 24, 2013 11:11 AM
2 great countries even tho I don't like neither. Its a pitty that they cannot come to an agreement.


by: abel cabrera from: Houston texas
November 24, 2013 11:03 AM
China became dangerous with his power...


by: we chinese
November 24, 2013 9:57 AM
in the perspective of you america,it seems strange that whatever china do is wrong and regarded as an act of expansion, whatever the Japanese do , however, is right and self defense. you america have no rights to do such kind of judgement. it' totally unfair.

In Response

by: Weiwei from: beijing
November 25, 2013 2:07 AM
I agree with you.


by: Double Standards
November 24, 2013 9:50 AM
Didn't South China once belong to the Vietnamese? Didn't Tibet once belong to the Tibetans? So what ? The Chinese still shamelessly claims it is an inherent part of China anyway.Supposedly,even if the Senkaku once was Chinese territory. So what ? It is now Japanese territory. If China does not return Tibet to the Tibetans, Xinjang to the Uighurs,Southern China to the Vietnamese,then why should Japan return the Senkaku to the Chinese.You can not make a territorial claim using some old maps,otherwise Great Britain would have legitimate claims over many parts of the world including Shanghai and Hongkong.The Chinese have been doing exactly what Germany did before the Second World War,just after Hitler came to power,challenging the Allies by changing the Status Quo by the threatened use of force.If the US and Japan don't react firmly and aggressively,China would take this as a submission and a tacit acknowledgement of China's legitimate territorial claim.Then China would go on adapting the same tactics over the South China Sea,Aranuchal Pradesh and Russian Far East.China has to be challenged and stopped before it is too late.If America is too weary and cautious,they should let Japan take the lead in the fight against Chinese expansionism,as they are the only hope left for Asia !

In Response

by: Double Standards
November 26, 2013 8:59 AM
@Zhuubaajie: Now you spitted out the truth.China thinks that it is now economically and military strong,and the PLA is a such formidable force that noone would want to challenge.That's why China has been threatening all its neighbours,bringing about disputes,forcing them into conceding land and sea areas,as China has done for thousands of years.Last year America failed to help the Philippines defend the Scarborough Shoal.That indicated America's commitments to their allies. The imposition of the new ADIZ over the Senkakus is a test of America's resolve and commitments in East Asia.

Somehow,this time the Chinese have encountered some setbacks.Not just Japan,but South Korea, America and Indonesia condemned the move.Besides,the Pentagon has announced that it would protect all American operating in the area.China has got nuclear weapons,so what? You think China is going to get out of this war unscathed? China should act more responsibly,rather taking advantage of its nuclear capability.No wonder,China has always been the laughingstock of the world and everybody looks down on China.Remember,it was America who saved you Chinese from Japanese domination,and you should be grateful for your independence and freedom.

Don't try to take other people's lands or force your wishes on them,as you never wanted to be trampled on by foreigners either.The Chinese usually say:"Righteousness would prevail over evil". So you are definitely going to fail and suffer on your evil path ! By the way,you could boycott Japanese products,and we could boycott Chinese ,who are going to suffer? There would be widespread riots all over the streets of China....None would win the next war, we all would suffer.So don't be naive and listen to those pork-bellied,corrupt and lusty hawks in Beijing and fight a stupid war while they all live like kings in the luxury of their palaces

In Response

by: Zhuubaajie from: Hong Kong
November 26, 2013 3:27 AM
Yes indeed. China should learn from the hegemon winner, who sets the moral standards in the world. Learn how America gained Texas, California, and even Hawaii and other territories. That is the right way to do it.

No double standards. China has just as many nukes and China has just as much rights.


by: Tim from: usa
November 24, 2013 9:46 AM
These chinese propoganda posts are ridiculous. Japans ownership of the islands is clear. China is being a bully. Move on China. I hope the US will remain strong on this. China is only so bold because the US is wimpy right now with the current admin.


by: Lily from: China
November 24, 2013 9:06 AM
Does America know and speak something about the following:Japan demarcates air defense close to China, and enters their warship into the sea zone for the Chinese maritime drill.

In Response

by: Zhuubaajie from: Hong Kong
November 26, 2013 3:37 AM
@ Mike from Odessa

Just one question - WHY is Chinese sovereign territory yours to give away? What gives you that right? Nukes? Bigger guns?

Has China ever cowered in front of so called superior power? At the time of entering the Korean War, China's steel production was 650,000 MT a year, vs. America's 98 million MT. China had no nukes and America had plenty. Today the gap is not so big - in fact China makes 716 million MT vs. America's 88. China is also well along the way to have ramjet powered, 8 times speed of sound nuke-tipped missiles that can reach anywhere in the world in less than 2 hours.

As long as the standards are clearly stated, the parties can certainly act rationally and accordingly. If there are prerequisites, Beijing would just work harder to meet them. But sovereign territory is not for Beijing to lose.

In Response

by: MIKE from: ODESSA TEXAS, USA
November 24, 2013 10:59 AM
A child could fix this issue. Split them down the middle. Give China a slice and give Japan a slice. 50/50. Why does every one want to fuss and fight with so many nuclear weapons hanging on planes and war ships.? All it would take is a young soldier to make a fatal mistake on either side. Think people. Is it worth war for a tiny little rock in ocean? STOP and think for a change...


by: Lily from: China
November 24, 2013 5:41 AM
Japan has the right to claim air-defence zone near toChina.Why China has not?


by: yao wong from: China
November 24, 2013 1:10 AM
why can't China own air defence zone?while US and Japan all own the same thing!why we always wrong if we do the same defence,and why you US and Japan are always right?tell me why?because of you double standards!


by: oldlamb from: Guangzhou
November 24, 2013 12:39 AM
I wonder why China do the same thing always is later than Japan.Decades ago,Japanese released their air defense zone in East China Sea.What China response was protest to Japan only at that time, untill now the real reaction was made by China.As normal Chinese we have refrained from Japanese militarism too long time.

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