News / Middle East

US to Provide $60 Million for Syrian Opposition

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Syrian National Coalition President Mouaz al-Khatib, after a news conference at Villa Madama in Rome, February 28, 2013.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Syrian National Coalition President Mouaz al-Khatib, after a news conference at Villa Madama in Rome, February 28, 2013.
VOA News
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Thursday announced $60 million in additional aid to the Syrian opposition and also for the first time an unspecified amount of non-lethal aid to some of its military forces.
 
The announcement came in Rome where Kerry attended a meeting with the Syrian opposition leaders and officials from dozens of countries supporting them.
 
Kerry said the $60 million will enable the opposition to provide services in areas it controls and help build its local support. Militant groups have filled that role in some areas, raising concerns in the West.
 
The military aid — combat rations and medical supplies — will be the first provided by the United States directly to the opposition military council.

Kerry said the international community is committed to working with the Syrian opposition "with peace as a first resort."

"They are the legitimate voice of the Syrian people.  And that stands in very stark contrast to the rule of Bashar al-Assad, who long ago lost his legitimacy and who is out of time and who must be out of power," said Kerry.
 
The Syrian opposition wants weapons, and was hoping for at least equipment like body armor and armored vehicles. The United States is concerned about any supplies being passed to the militants, who have many of the most effective fighting units.
 
Concern over militants
 
At a news conference Thursday, after what is called the Friends of Syria meeting, Kerry referred to the concern about militants, and the balance the international community is trying to strike between pressing for an end to the Assad regime and not strengthening the extremists.
 
“We can't risk letting this country in the heart of the Middle East be destroyed by vicious autocrats or hijacked by the extremists," he said. "In supporting the Syrian Opposition Coalition and the Free Syrian Army, we reject both of those choices.”
 
Kerry has said the United States wants to "change the calculation" Syrian President Bashar al-Assad is making as he clings to power and orders increasingly brutal attacks on civilian areas.
 
“What we're doing today is part of a whole, and I am very confident that that whole is going to have the ability for President Assad to realize he better start measuring more effectively what his future is, what his choices are and what kinds of weapons he uses," he said.
 
"So I'm very confident in what the president [Obama] has put forward today as the beginning of a process that will, in fact, change his [Assad's] calculation,” Kerry said.
 
Opposition demands
 
The president of the Syrian Opposition Coalition, Mouaz al-Khatib, spoke forcefully at the news conference, calling on President Assad to stop bombing civilian areas. Khatib also expressed impatience with his foreign supporters, who he believes are overly concerned about their aid falling into the hands of terrorists.
 
"No terrorists in the world have such a savage nature as that of the Syrian regime,” he said.
 
The meeting's communique said the opposition coalition would soon appoint someone to lead an interim government that would operate inside Syria.

That was expected to come at a meeting scheduled for Istanbul on Saturday. But the activists announced Thursday that the meeting was called off.

Khalid Saleh, director of the media office for the Syrian National Coalition, told VOA that some coalition members were unable to attend because they were not consulted about the date and because some members had scheduling conflicts.

Saleh said the activists plan to reschedule the election of an interim prime minister within a few days.

 "No new date has been set. I cannot reveal the reasons at this time and I do not exclude its cancellation," opposition member Samir Nashar told the French news agency.
  • Secretary of State John Kerry, left, and Qatar crown prince, Sheik Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, start their meeting at the Prince's Sea Palace residence in Doha, Qatar, March 5, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is met by Qatari Chief of Protocol Abdullah Fakhroo and Qatari Ambassador to the U.S. Mohamed al-Rumaihi at Doha International Airport, March 5, 2013.
  • The red carpet is rolled up after U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry boarded his plane to leave Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates on his way to the final destination of Qatar, March 5, 2013.
  • Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan invites U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry to pose with him for a photograph before their dinner meeting at the Emirates Palace hotel in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, March 4, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry walks with Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal on arrival in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, March 3, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi at the Presidential Palace in Cairo, Egypt, March 3, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry attends an Antikabir Wreath Laying ceremony at the Tomb of Ataturk in Ankara, Turkey, March 2, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry holds a news conference with Syrian National Coalition Chairman Mouaz al-Khatib and Italian Foreign Minister Giulio Terzi at Villa Madama in Rome, Feb. 28, 2013.
  • A peace activist protests at the end of statements given by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Syrian National Coalition President Mouaz al-Khatib at Villa Madama in Rome, Feb. 28, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with French President Francois Hollande at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Feb. 27, 2013.
  • Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov gestures while standing with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry in Berlin, Germany, Feb. 26, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and German Chancellor Angela Merkel speak to the media at the Chancellery in Berlin, Feb. 26, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with the children of U.S. embassy staff in Berlin, Feb. 26, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry at a news conference with British Foreign Secretary William Hague in London, Feb. 25, 2013.
  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry visits with the traveling media aboard a plane en route to London on his inaugural trip as secretary, Feb. 24, 2013.

You May Like

Cambodia Seeks Official UN Maps for Vietnam Border

Notice of request comes as 2 countries open border talks Tuesday after a clash last month More

From South Africa to Vietnam, Cyclists Deliver Message Against Rhino Horns

Appalled by poaching they saw firsthand, sisters embark on tour to raise awareness in countries where rhino horn products are in demand More

Uber Wants Johannesburg Police Protection

Request follows recent protests outside ride-hailing service's Johannesburg office More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
 Previous    
by: Hafez Azam from: Lebanon
February 28, 2013 8:20 AM
hey USA, you might as well support Al Qaeda... if you think that the Arab Spring is some sort of a rush to democratic enlightenment... you are fools... by now, you should know not to trust Arabs... they will use your Humanitarian sensitivities to stab you in the back... one thing i am in favor of, if the "rebels" (AL Nusra) wins, that will spell the end of Hizbullah (a terrorist organization that has chocked my country for 30 years) - that will be good
In Response

by: ali from: new york
February 28, 2013 9:09 AM
yes ,you are all right .The rebels are getting help from Osama bin laden group. too bad for us policy maker. they never get it.
     

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Getting it Done Beyond a Nuclear Deali
X
July 07, 2015 12:02 PM
If a nuclear deal is reached between Iran and world powers in Vienna, it will be a highly technical road map to be used to monitor nuclear activity in Iran for years to come to ensure Tehran does not make nuclear weapons. Equally as complicated will be dismantling international sanctions that were originally intended to be ironclad. VOA’s Heather Murdock talks to experts about the key challenges any deal will present.
Video

Video Getting it Done Beyond a Nuclear Deal

If a nuclear deal is reached between Iran and world powers in Vienna, it will be a highly technical road map to be used to monitor nuclear activity in Iran for years to come to ensure Tehran does not make nuclear weapons. Equally as complicated will be dismantling international sanctions that were originally intended to be ironclad. VOA’s Heather Murdock talks to experts about the key challenges any deal will present.
Video

Video Rice Farmers Frustrated As Drought Grips Thailand

A severe drought in Thailand is limiting the growing season of the country’s important rice crop. Farmers are blaming the government for not doing more to protect a key export. Steve Sandford reports from Chiang Mai, Thailand.
Video

Video Making Music, Fleeing Bombs: New Film on Sudan’s Internal Refugees

In 2012, Sudanese filmmaker Hajooj Kuka went to make a documentary among civil war refugees in Sudan’s Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains region. What he found surprised him: music was helping to save people from bombing raids by their own government. VOA’s Carolyn Weaver has more.
Video

Video 'From This Day Forward' Reveals Difficult Journey of Transgender Parent

In her documentary, "From This Day Forward", filmmaker Sharon Shattuck reveals the personal journey of her transgender father, as he told his family that he always felt he was a woman inside and decided to live as one. VOA’s Penelope Poulou has more.
Video

Video Floodwaters Threaten Iconic American Home

The Farnsworth House in the Midwest State of Illinois is one of the most iconic homes in America. Thousands of tourists visit the site every year. Its location near a river inspired the design of the house, but, as VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, that very location is now threatening the existence of this National Historic Landmark.
Video

Video Olympics Construction Scars Sacred Korean Mountain

Environmentalists in South Korea are protesting a Winter Olympics construction project to build a ski slope through a 500-year-old protected forest. Brian Padden reports that although there is strong national support for hosting the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, there are growing public concerns over the costs and possible ecological damage at the revered mountain.
Video

Video Xenophobia Victims in South Africa Flee Violence, Then Return

Many Malawians fled South Africa early this year after xenophobic attacks on African immigrants. But many quickly found life was no better at home and have returned to South Africa – often illegally and without jobs, and facing the tough task of having to start over. Lameck Masina and Anita Powell file from Johannesburg.
Video

Video Family of American Marine Calls for Release From Iranian Prison

As the crowd of journalists covering the Iran talks swells, so too do the opportunities for media coverage.  Hoping to catch the attention of high-level diplomats, the family of American-Iranian marine Amir Hekmati is in Vienna, pleading for his release from an Iranian prison after nearly 4 years.  VOA’s Heather Murdock reports from Vienna.
Video

Video UK Holds Terror Drill as MPs Mull Tunisia Response

After pledging a tough response to last Friday’s terror attack in Tunisia, which came just days before the 10th anniversary of the bomb attacks on London’s transport network, British security services are shifting their focus to overseas counter-terror operations. VOA's Henry Ridgwell has more.
Video

Video Obama on Cuba: This is What Change Looks Like

President Barack Obama says the United States will soon reopen its embassy in Cuba for the first time since 1961, ending a half-century of isolation. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Video

Video Hate Groups Spread Influence Via Internet

Hate groups of various kinds are using the Internet for propaganda and recruitment, and a Jewish human rights organization that monitors these groups, the Simon Wiesenthal Center, says their influence is growing. The messages are different, but the calls to hatred or violence are similar. VOA's Mike O’Sullivan reports.
Video

Video Blind Somali Journalist Defies Odds in Mogadishu

Despite improving security in the last few years, Somalia remains one of the most dangerous countries to be a journalist – even more so for someone who cannot see. Abdulaziz Billow has the story of journalist Abdifatah Hassan Kalgacal, who has been reporting from the Somali capital for the last decade despite being blind.

VOA Blogs