World News

Korean Passenger Jet Crashes in San Francisco, 2 Dead



An Asiana Airlines passenger jet carrying 291 passengers and 16 crew members crash landed at San Francisco International Airport Saturday, killing at least two people. More than 100 people were hurt, with some in serious condition.

Flight 214 originated in Shanghai, China and stopped in Seoul, South Korea before heading to San Francisco on the west coast of the United States.

Various reports say the tail of the Boeing 777 hit the runway before the plane crashed and caught fire. No distress signal from the cockpit was issued before the crash.

Teams of investigators are headed to the sight of the wreckage to determine the exact cause of the crash, which occurred in good weather.

Television pictures show the plane on the ground with its tail missing and one wing appearing to have collapsed. The top of the fuselage is burned through. Debris from what appears to be part of the tail is scattered along the runway.



Witnesses say the plane approached the runway at an awkward angle and upon landing, wobbled and spun around, its tail breaking off.

Officials say among those onboard were 141 Chinese, 77 South Koreans, 61 Americans and one Japanese national. The identities of two people killed are not currently known.

President Barack Obama said his thoughts and prayers go out to the families that lost a loved one and all those affected by the crash. He also expressed his gratitude to the emergency crews who first responded to the disaster.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation says there is no indication of terrorism. It will work with the National Transportation Safety Board, Korean investigators and Boeing as the probe unfolds.

Investigators hope the flight data recorders will give them vital information into what caused the crash.

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