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Korean Passenger Jet Crashes in San Francisco, 2 Dead



San Francisco's fire chief says 19 people remain hospitalized, six in critical condition, after an Asiana Airlines jet carrying more than 300 passengers and crew members crashed while landing Saturday at the city's airport.
The two passengers killed were 16-year-old Chinese girls who were among a group of 30 students and their teachers headed to a summer camp from east China's Zhejiang province.
The Asiana flight originated in Shanghai, China, and stopped in South Korea before heading to San Francisco .
Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board are examining flight data recorders found in the wreckage for clues to what caused the Boeing 777 to crash.

Witnesses say the plane's tail appeared to hit the runway first as it landed. After the crash, much of the cabin burned through and debris was scattered along the runway.
Asiana Airlines officials say the there is no indication of mechanical problems with the plane or its engines at the time of the crash.
Asiana is South Korea's second largest airline after national carrier Korean Air.
The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation says there is no indication the accident was linked to terrorism. The FBI will work with the National Transportation Safety Board, Korean investigators and Boeing as the probe unfolds.
President Barack Obama expressed his condolences to the victims and their families.
The Xinhua News Agency Sunday said China's President Xi Jinping offered his condolences to the victims' families and ordered Chinese diplomatic missions to do everything they can to help the survivors.
In 2008, a British Airways Boeing 777 jet crash-landed short of the runway at London's Heathrow Airport, but all on board survived.

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