News / Europe

Kremlin Foe Berezovsky Dies in Britain

Russian oligarch Boris Berezovsky speaks to members of the media after losing his court battle against Roman Abramovich, at a division of the High Court in London August 31, 2012.Russian oligarch Boris Berezovsky speaks to members of the media after losing his court battle against Roman Abramovich, at a division of the High Court in London August 31, 2012.
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Russian oligarch Boris Berezovsky speaks to members of the media after losing his court battle against Roman Abramovich, at a division of the High Court in London August 31, 2012.
Russian oligarch Boris Berezovsky speaks to members of the media after losing his court battle against Roman Abramovich, at a division of the High Court in London August 31, 2012.
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VOA News
British police say they are investigating the death of exiled Russian tycoon and Kremlin critic Boris Berezovsky.

The 67-year-old businessman was found dead Saturday at a property in Ascot, a town about 40 kilometers west of London.

Police issued a statement saying that his death is currently being treated as unexplained and that a full inquiry is under way.

Berezovsky had lived in Britain since 2000 after falling out with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Russia had demanded his extradition on charge of fraud, but the British government refused and granted him political asylum.

British police officers cordon off a road near a residence in Ascot, a town 40 kilometers west of London, Saturday, Mar. 23, 2013.British police officers cordon off a road near a residence in Ascot, a town 40 kilometers west of London, Saturday, Mar. 23, 2013.
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British police officers cordon off a road near a residence in Ascot, a town 40 kilometers west of London, Saturday, Mar. 23, 2013.
British police officers cordon off a road near a residence in Ascot, a town 40 kilometers west of London, Saturday, Mar. 23, 2013.
Berezovsky had made headlines in recent years over various business deals and legal disputes.  Last year he lost a legal battle with Russian businessmen Roman Abramovich, also in London, whom he accused of using threat and intimidation to force him to sell shares in the Russian oil company Sibneft at a fraction of their value.

Last week, news media reported that Berezovsky had begun to sell personal assets to pay debts related to that lawsuit.

Russian broadcaster Russia Today quoted Berezovsky's lawyer Alexander Dobrinovsky, the head of a Moscow-based legal firm, as saying his client may have committed suicide.

Berezovsky, a former mathematician and government official, made his fortune in the post-Soviet Russia of the 1990s.

 

He profited from gaining control over various assets, including the country's main television channel, Channel One.  In 1997, Forbes magazine estimated Berezovsky's wealth at $3 billion.

 

Berezovsky was at the height of his power during President Boris Yeltsin's years in office, and Berezovsky was made deputy secretary of Russia's security council.

 

He helped form the Unity party and became a parliament member.  Berezovsky was initially a supporter of President Vladimir Putin, but the two clashed soon after  Putin's election in 2000.  Berezovsky then became a vocal Kremlin critic.   

 

In late 2000, Russian authorities demanded that Berezovsky appear for questioning, but he did not return from abroad.  Instead, he moved to Britain, where he was later granted political asylum.  

 

A Russian court convicted him in absentia of economic crimes.

 

The government took over his television assets and appropriated his other holdings in the country.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Gennady from: Russia, Volga Region
March 25, 2013 9:48 PM
To Igor:
Overwhelming majority of Russians (99%) are losers to 1% of billionaires and those who serve their interests and usurped all legitimate power. We’ve lost the Russian Constitution, all elections; all Russia’s industry, healthcare, education and science are in shambles. With every day the Russia that stretches beyond the Moscow Circle Road becomes poorer and weaker.


by: Gennady from: Russia, Volga Region
March 24, 2013 9:47 PM
To Roman, Igor
It looks like two of you are cloned.
The problem with you is that you watch too much zombifying State Television (putinivisor) of high jacked Russia and don’t suspect that there is a great big world called “XXI century” outside your blue screen.
In order to elucidate you about who stole Russian people money I would advice you to google
“Who is the wealthiest man in Russia?”
"Where did his money come from?”
“Who stole Russian elections?”
“Where’re Russian people’s basic human rights?”
I’m sure it will widen you horizon.

In Response

by: Igor from: Russia
March 24, 2013 10:18 PM
To: Gennady
You must be another loser who is trying to deceive yourself by denying the facts that our nation is stronger and stronger, our people is wealthier and wealthier. We will not be affected by those who have lost the competition to the power because they have failed to win the heart and mind of the majority of russians and by those who are ready to receive dirty money from some hostile foreign organizations disguised as some NGOs to create a chaotic society to serve the benefits of our enemies.


by: Gennady from: Russia, Volga Region
March 23, 2013 9:51 PM
Mr. Berezovsky will be remembered as the brave man who on the pattern of biblical David waged fight against the monster Goliath by being Kremlin’s foe №1. After a line of suspicious deaths in Britain of Russian émigrés, Berezovsky’s death will always be looked upon as particularly suspicious and unexplained. Litvinenko’s death is the proof. Everybody should keep in mind that Berezovsky loved life very much for not being weak to commit suicide. With his death the opposition movement in Russia will lose very much. But in God they trust!

In Response

by: Ivan from: Russia
March 24, 2013 9:36 AM
Of two cockroaches, the fittest survives. Name it Goliath if you please.

In Response

by: Roman from: Russia
March 24, 2013 4:46 AM
We lost the man who stole russian people's money in the 90's and fleed abroad when he lost his power in the goverment. It's very pity(((

In Response

by: Igor from: Russia
March 24, 2013 12:32 AM
Hey Gennady, Mr. Berezovsky is a loser, no more, no less. He cannot stand for any Russian. Do not link him to the so-called "Opposition Movement" which is seeking to sell your homeland for power.

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