News / USA

Lab Chimp Revolts in 'Rise of the Planet of the Apes'

On the Golden Gate Bridge, Caesar leads a revolution that will ultimately lead to the 'Rise of the Planet of the Apes.'
On the Golden Gate Bridge, Caesar leads a revolution that will ultimately lead to the 'Rise of the Planet of the Apes.'

Multimedia

Penelope Poulou

"Rise of the Planet of the Apes" is the prequel to "Planet of the Apes," the sci-fi saga which debuted in 1968. Back then, a crew of astronauts crash-lands in the distant future on a planet where intelligent apes dominate humans.

The new film, "Rise of the Planet of the Apes," chronicles events leading up to the dominance of the apes.

Actor James Franco portrays Will Rodman, a scientist at a large pharmaceutical company conducting research to develop a drug that restores damaged brain tissue in humans. His ultimate goal is to cure Alzheimer’s disease, a cause close to his heart because of his ailing father.

To further his goal, he experiments on chimpanzees and finds the drug radically boosts brain function. That is obvious in Caesar, a young chimp exposed to the drug in the womb when scientists gave the drug to his mother.

Will adopts the baby chimp and raises him at home. Ceasar learns to read and write and he has a deep affection for his human family. But his animal nature clashes with his human upbringing. He uses brute force against a neighbor who bullies Charles, Will’s father.

Realizing he can no longer keep Caesar, Will takes him to what he believes is a place where Caesar can socialize with his kind. But the San Bruno Primate Sanctuary resembles a prison where the animals are locked up in cages.

For the first time, Caesar is confronted with humanity’s dark side. He reacts by inciting a revolt.

Filmmaker Rupert Wyatt creates a larger-than-life film with a philosophical concept and great special effects.

The story is told from Ceasar’s point of view and explains what led to the apes' supremacy in the earlier installments of the franchise.

Actor Andy Serkis, who portrays Caesar, studied the movements of real primates. The actor's facial  expressions are transposed onto the ape through motion capture technology first introduced in Peter Jackson's 2005 film, "King Kong."

Serkis interpreted King Kong back then as he does now with Ceasar. The difference is that Caesar is a far more realistic looking computer-generated primate, who interacts with the other characters.

“This is an unknowing, very innocent child," Serkis says of his character. "He suddenly becomes aware that the world is not an easy place to live in, and he has to make very strong choices to survive."

The film’s climactic moment signals the end of humanity as we know it and the dawning of a new era - as well as the promise of subsequent prequels in the "Planet of the Apes" franchise.  

You May Like

China Investigates Former Powerful Security Chief

Former security chief and member of Politburo Standing Committee, Zhou Yongkang, under investigation for suspected 'serious disciplinary violation' More

India, US Look to Reset Ties During Kerry Visit

This week's talks will be first high level interaction between two countries since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took charge More

Video Young African Leadership Program Renamed to Honor Mandela

YALI program, launched by President Obama in 2010, aims to build skills in business, entrepreneurship, public management and civic leadership More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid