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Military Judge Considers Fate of US WikiLeaks Soldier

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The case of U.S. soldier Bradley Manning, charged with leaking thousands of classified government documents, is in the hands of a military judge.

Manning attorney David Coombs summed up his defense Friday by calling his client a wistleblower who wanted the public to know about what he saw as U.S. misdeeds in Iraq.

The leaked material included video of U.S. soldiers on a helicopter shooting Iraqi civilians. Twelve people were killed, including two Reuters journalists. The U.S. military says the soldiers thought the Iraqis were carrying weapons.

Coombs described Manning as "young, naive, and good-intentioned," but not the fame-seeking traitor portrayed by prosecutors who summed up their case Thursday.

Manning has already pleaded guilty to leaking the documents to the WikiLeaks website -- a charge that could get him up to 20 years in prison.

The prosecution says Manning leaked the material knowing it would be seen by al-Qaida terrorists. If found guilty of this, he would face a possible sentence of life in prison.

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