News / Asia

Nagasaki Marks US Atomic Bombing Anniversary

Local residents pray for victims of the 1945 atomic bombing during a mass at the Urakami Cathedral in Nagasaki, western Japan, on the 68th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Aug. 9, 2013.
Local residents pray for victims of the 1945 atomic bombing during a mass at the Urakami Cathedral in Nagasaki, western Japan, on the 68th anniversary of the bombing of Nagasaki, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Aug. 9, 2013.
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VOA News
The Japanese city of Nagasaki has observed the 68th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing that reduced the city to rubble and ended WWII.

Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue criticized the Japanese government at a ceremony Friday for refusing to sign a statement rejecting the use of nuclear weapons. The statement was offered at an international disarmament meeting in April.

The United States dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, killing about 140,000 people. Days later, on August 9, Nagasaki was hit by a second nuclear bomb that killed about 70,000.

Hiroshima held an observance of the first bombing on Tuesday. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told a crowd of about 50,000 that Japan has a unique responsibility to push for the end of nuclear weapons.

  • Doves fly near the Peace Statue in Nagasaki's Peace Park during a ceremony commemorating the 68th anniversary of the atomic bombing of the city, August 9, 2013. (Reuters/Kyodo)
  • Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe offers a flower wreath for victims of the 1945 atomic bombing during a ceremony at Peace Park in Nagasaki, August 9, 2013. (Reuters/Kyodo)
  • People pray for victims of the 1945 atomic bombing during a mass at the Urakami Cathedral in Nagasaki on the 68th anniversary of the bombing of the city, August 9, 2013. (Reuters/Kyodo)
  • Pacifists stage a demonstration at the Peace Wall in Paris, to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, August 9, 2013.
  • Students arrange themselves into the formation of a dove to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Japanese cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Chennai, India, August 8, 2013.
  • A student participates in a peace rally to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the atomic bombings of the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in Mumbai, August 6, 2013.

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by: William J Tavella from: Nonya
August 09, 2013 9:40 AM
Dec 7th 1941 NEVER FORGET! Evidently we have as quickly as we have forgotten 911! Japan still hasn't accepted responsibility for its actions in WWII. They made the Germans look like choir boys! But the leftist media (JEWISH RUN) makes them (Germans) out to be the worst evil that ever existed. We didn't drop enough of them on Japan!


by: lejardin
August 09, 2013 8:28 AM
But the Nagasaki bombing DIDN'T end WWII... it didn't even coerce them to surrender! On Aug. 9, the Supreme Council STILL insisted on retaining the emperor, and STILL did not surrender! It wasn't until Aug. 13, when the US dropped the equivalent of about half a nuke's worth of *conventional* explosives on 8 or so Japanese cities (this was in fact the largest conventional bombing of WWII) that they finally decided enough was enough and (unofficially) surrendered.

People forget this inconvenient fact when lambasting the US for its actions, but the leaders (mostly military) of the unfortunate Japanese people were completely dug in, as was the military in general, as was shown by the carnage of Okinawa, forcing more and more American attacks.

In Response

by: Glenn Gulling
August 09, 2013 10:02 AM
I did not know this! Thanks for the information! I will try to confirm for myself as soon as I can. I recall that the argument for using the bomb was that they were not going to give up, I did not know that they still refused to give up after the second bomb.
Indeed a strong and powerful people.

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