News / Asia

New Pope Raises Profile of Jesuits in Asia

Newly elected Pope Francis (C), Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, walks in the 5th-century Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore during a private visit in Rome, March 14, 2013.Newly elected Pope Francis (C), Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, walks in the 5th-century Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore during a private visit in Rome, March 14, 2013.
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Newly elected Pope Francis (C), Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, walks in the 5th-century Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore during a private visit in Rome, March 14, 2013.
Newly elected Pope Francis (C), Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, walks in the 5th-century Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore during a private visit in Rome, March 14, 2013.
Simone Orendain
As Pope Francis begins his papacy as the Roman Catholic Church's first Jesuit leader, he is raising the profile of a religious order that has long been involved in missionary work in Asia.

The Society of Jesus - or the Jesuits as they are commonly known - is a Catholic order whose members are known for their austerity, ambitious missionary work and focus on education.

The nearly 500-year-old order is a few hundred years newer than the other prominent Catholic orders such as the Benedictines, Augustinians and Dominicans, which all have had popes chosen from their ranks.

The Rev. William Currie said one reason for the lack of a Jesuit pontiff until now may be “a certain amount of suspicion” surrounding the order. Currie is a Jesuit himself, and the former president of Sophia University, a Jesuit school in Tokyo.

Pope Francis

-Full name: Jorge Mario Bergoglio
-Born December 17, 1936 (age 76) in Buenos Aires, Argentina
-Made cardinal by Pope John Paul II in February 2001
-First pope from Latin America
-First Jesuit pope
“Jesuits are picked out for criticism more than most other religious orders, going back to England or the Reformation when ‘Jesuitical’ was a bad word. It meant someone who was devious and sly and cunning and that sort of thing. Those sort of things probably don't come to minds of cardinals when they're electing a pope, but it's a stereotype that dies hard,” said Currie.

The stereotype is far removed from Ricardo Jalbuena’s experience of Jesuits. The 56-year-old attended the Ateneo de Manila University, a Jesuit school, from elementary days through college. He admitted his bias for Pope Francis’s religious order.

“The beauty about the Jesuit community is that it is a very dynamic and diverse culture of great theological minds, who are always are there to study, explore, challenge ideas…” he said.

Some members of the Society of Jesus have been known for being outspoken on political and religious issues, and for living materially humble lives.

The Rev. Mario Francisco, president of the Loyola School of Theology at the Ateneo in Manila, called the new pope’s life “unusual” because it has been widely reported that Pope Francis, when he was Cardinal Jorje Mario Bergoglio of Argentina, gave up the cardinal’s mansion for an apartment and took public transportation.

“And I think the fact that he takes the name for Francis of Assisi is another indication of that sort of preference and love for the poor and a simple lifestyle. That is, I think, very, very good,” said Francisco.

Jalbuena said he believes Pope Francis chose his name after Francis Xavier, one of the Jesuits’ founders who spent years evangelizing in India, Indonesia and Japan in the 16th century.

The new pope has not yet said personally that either of those two major figures in the Roman Catholic Church was the inspiration for his name.

  • Pope Francis with Argentine President Cristina Fernandez, holding a picture of a plaque commemorating the 1984 peace and friendship treaty between Argentina and Chile, March 18, 2013.
  • Pope Francis and Uruguay's priest Gonzalo Aemilius greet people at the Vatican, March 17, 2013.
  • Pope Francis greets the crowds after conducting a mass in Saint Anna church inside the Vatican, March 17, 2013.
  • Pope Francis appears at the window of his future private apartment to bless the faithful, gathered below in St. Peter's Square, during the Sunday Angelus prayer at the Vatican March 17, 2013.
  • Pope Francis conducts a mass in Santa Anna church inside the Vatican, March 17, 2013.
  • Pope Francis leaves the Paul VI hall with security at the Vatican, March 16, 2013.
  • Pope Francis checks out of the church-run residence where he had been staying in Rome before becoming pontiff, March, 14, 2013. (Osservatore Romano)
  • Key chains featuring images of the newly-elected Pope Francis are displayed in a tourist shop near the Vatican in Rome, March 15, 2013.
  • In this image made from video provided by CTV, Pope Francis celebrates his inaugural Mass with cardinals, inside the Sistine Chapel, at the Vatican, March 14, 2013.
  • Newly elected Pope Francis waves from the steps of the Santa Maria Maggiore Basilica in Rome, March 14, 2013.
  • Newly elected Pope Francis walks in the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore during a private visit in Rome, March 14, 2013.
  • Newly elected Pope Francis makes a private visit to the 5th-century Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore, in a photo released by Osservatore Romano in Rome, March 14, 2013.
  • A nun takes a photograph of the first batch of souvenirs adorned with freshly-printed pictures of the newly-elected Pope Francis in a shop at the Vatican, March 14, 2013.

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by: Francisco from: Argentina
March 14, 2013 9:04 PM
the truth about this guy's complicity in Argentina's atrocities start to emerge...

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