News / Americas

    Pena Nieto Wins Mexican Presidential Election, Runner-Up Charges Fraud

    Presidential candidate Enrique Pena Nieto speaks to supporters at his party's headquarters in Mexico City, Mexico, July 2, 2012.
    Presidential candidate Enrique Pena Nieto speaks to supporters at his party's headquarters in Mexico City, Mexico, July 2, 2012.
    VOA News
    Voters in Mexico have chosen to bring the country's once dominant political party back into power by electing Enrique Pena Nieto as their next president.

    With 98 percent of the votes counted, Pena Nieto has 38 percent while former Mexico City Mayor Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has 31 percent.

    Who is Enrique Peña Nieto?

    • A member of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Institucional, PRI) since 1984
    • Drew national attention as governor of the State of Mexico from 2005 to 2011
    • Built his reputation by making "pledges" to the State of Mexico, focusing on public works and infrastructure improvement
    • Ranked among country's most handsome politicians
    • Married Televisa soap star Angelica Rivera in 2010
    • Admitted that he had affairs and fathered two children during his first marriage to Monica Pretelini Saenz
    Obrador calls the results fraudulent and something no one can accept. His left-wing party will decide whether to formally challenge the results after all votes are counted.

    Obrador is accusing Pena Nieto's party, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, of buying votes, and says Mexico's news media gave favorable coverage to the PRI, helping to tilt the election in the party's favor.

    Obrador says he will challenge the results once they become official, but will not say if he will call for street protests similar to those he led in 2006, when he narrowly lost to outgoing President Felipe Calderon.

    U.S. President Barack Obama called Pena Nieto to congratulate him and offer U.S. support in meeting mutual goals.

    Pena Nieto told supporters that Mexicans have voted for a change in direction, but he vowed to keep pressure on drug cartels.

    "The fight against crime will continue with a new strategy to reduce violence and protect the lives of Mexicans," he said. "Let it be clear, with organized crime there will be no pacts or truce."

    Nieto's conservative Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) ruled Mexico for 71 years until 2000, when voters elected National Action Party (PAN) candidate Vicente Fox. Outgoing President Felipe Calderon also represents PAN. His administration has been plagued by economic stagnation and rampant drug violence.

    Calderon deployed the military to fight the drug cartels shortly after he took office in 2006. More than 50,000 people have been killed.

    The PAN candidate in this year's election, Josefina Vazquez Mota, finished third in the voting.

    • Enrique Pena Nieto, presidential candidate for the Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI), left, speaks to supporters accompanied by his wife Angelica Rivera at the party's headquarters in Mexico City, early Monday, July 2, 2012.
    • Enrique Pena Nieto greets supporters after exit polls showed him in first place, in Mexico City, July 1, 2012.
    • Supporters of Enrique Pena Nieto celebrate at party headquarters as exit polls begin to come in, Mexico City, July 1, 2012.
    • Supporters of Enrique Pena Nieto celebrate at the PRI party headquarters as results begin to come in on the general elections in Mexico City, July 1, 2012.
    • Supporters of Enrique Pena Nieto gather at their party's headquarters in Mexico City, Mexico, July 1, 2012.
    • residential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the Democratic Revolution Party (PRD) speaks in Mexico City, July 1, 2012.



    Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.
     

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 2
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    by: Jorge from: Guadalajara
    July 03, 2012 2:14 PM
    I don't care if this guy or anyone wins, I didn't vote because:
    PAN - Failed
    PRD - Leftists
    PRI - Can't trust them
    If there were a far right candidate who could deal with the huge illegal immigrant population in both the north and south of the country, take down the drug cartels, and bring back old, true Mexican culture and the values it was built on, maybe I would vote for that guy. I do wish this guy good luck, and I hope he deals with both illegal populations (Americans north of the border, Central Americans in southern areas) and the drug cartels. I can only hope.

    by: Jessica from: Lopez
    July 03, 2012 11:01 AM
    It's not right that the president Barack Obama is giving his support to an impostor, this guy STOLE the presidency, he is not liked and everywhere he goes an impressive body of public and private security is deployed, so if the mexican people like this guy, What is he afraid of? Hugs, Kisses...? I don't think so.

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    July 03, 2012 9:34 AM
    After the Caldelon's deployment of the millitary to fight the drug cartels, "more than 50,000 people have been killed". What does this passage mean? Victimes of parties between the organized drug cartels? Or civlians? Or police officers and officials? I don't believe that Mexico is such a lawless country because she held summer olympic games successfully in ninteen sixty-eight. Mexico is famous for cactus and its unique music. Mexican people's spirit is considered strongly cheerful and not-worrying about future, taht is some kind of longing in Japan. I wish Mexico a safty society!
    In Response

    by: Karmen Nava from: Mexico
    July 04, 2012 6:12 AM
    Thank you for your trust in your fellowmen. Mexico has corruption like all of the countries in the world have. Read the Wikipedia on Mexico and you will see that Mexico's economy is not among the poorest nations. Many Mexicans compare themselves to the USA because it is next door, but Mexico is about 11th in Gross National Product and economically it is more successful than even some European nations. Mexico would be a relatively safe place to live and was until Plan Mexico was approved by both nations. This is when the death machine began to strike even those not involved with drug trafficking. The media presents a Mexico that is heavy lalden with drugs and filth. Where I live in Mexico it is virtually safe and a great place to educate the children. We have Canadians as well as Americans attending Mexican schools and this type of information will never be published because as most Latin American countries have to live under a low profile of disrespect. I tell the people who criticize including Mexicans who are always belittling themselves to help their country by looking at the positive contributions of the Mexican people. Mexico is rich in resources, architecture among the most beautiful in the world, and famous for their beautifull music and culture. Our beaches are just as beautiful as the best in the world.
    In Response

    by: Ron from: USA
    July 03, 2012 11:26 AM
    Yoshi, Things have changed a little since 1968.
    In Response

    by: dale from: felton,ca
    July 03, 2012 11:09 AM
    Yoshi, re the 68 summer Olympics in Mexico: showing the country is not lawless: From Wikipedia:
    "The Tlatelolco massacre..., was a government massacre of student and civilian protesters and bystanders that took place during the afternoon and night of October 2, 1968, in the Plaza de las Tres Culturas in the Tlatelolco section of Mexico City. The violence occurred ten days before the 1968 Summer Olympics celebrations in Mexico City. While at the time, government propaganda [1] and the mainstream media in Mexico claimed that government forces had been provoked by protesters shooting at them, government documents that have been made public since 2000 suggest that the snipers had in fact been employed by the government. Although estimates of the death toll range from thirty to three-hundred, with eyewitnesses reporting hundreds of dead,:

    This is state terrorism and lawlessness using false flag operations to mow down hundreds of peaceful protesters to crush dissent before the Olympics began. The 50,000 deaths in the War on Drugs were totally the result of a terrible law. If drugs were legalized (the War has failed), there would be no such mayhem. So both the government and the law are responsible for the violence. The solution is so simple. But who benefits from the War on Drugs: the narcs and the cartels.
    It's an industry, just as war is a racket.

    by: suzie home maker from: NY
    July 03, 2012 8:56 AM
    HE was not VOTED for by the people all you have to do is look at the evidence that, every voting center total was photographed by the citizens and the FEDERAL ELECTION did not add correctly ANT of the totals: It is obviouse by MANY reports HE NEVER WON.... why does US media not say what is happening really in MEXICO? Could it be that even the USA is involved.... in staying quite???
    In Response

    by: Margarita from: Mexico
    July 06, 2012 1:32 PM
    Excuse me Ron, but this is not the same situation as Venezuela's. And there are thousands of people in the street whether they are right-wing, left-wing calling Peña Nieto a fraud. It's clearly a fraudulent election. It's not about winning or losing, it's about defending democracy. There's an incredible amount of evidence that shows that this was not a legal process. We are living a dictatorship disguised as a democracy, so please unless you come and live what we have to in Mexico, don't tell us this is just a tantrum by a candidate.
    In Response

    by: ron from: USA
    July 03, 2012 11:30 AM
    Suzie of NY via Mexico: Most left wing candidates cry foul after getting beat in an election. They never want to admit defeat. Just watch what Chavez will do in Venezuela when he gets defeated.

    by: Jonathan Diaz
    July 03, 2012 12:42 AM
    Pena Nieto's party has "always been close" to the cartels and that he is in the best position to strike a deal to stabilize the killings

    by: chuckie from: California
    July 02, 2012 10:04 PM
    The guy looks like a model. I can't think of any presidents anywhere off the bat who both look so pretty and like a professional model so different in different shots. It made a difference in a close election. It shouldn't but you'd need to be blind not to see it would make a difference in a close race.

    by: Thomas John Taylor from: Hilo, Hawaii
    July 02, 2012 3:49 PM
    Awareness Of 1 Planet, Our Personal Belief Systems, Connectivity, Education, Communication, Freedom and Affordability, Equally For All Life.

    by: Anonymous
    July 02, 2012 3:44 PM
    It's so sad that even in the year 2012 where knowledge is so easy to get with the internet and information age, people are still too stupid to vote for the very political party and people that keep them down to begin with. The PRI IS the Mexican Mafia! And this newly elected president will be the worst president in the world, just watch! Either those who voted for them are total imbeciles, or the election was a fraud!

    by: Nate from: North Mexico
    July 02, 2012 3:16 PM
    ok, new Mexican government. Everyone go back home now, it's all fixed.
    In Response

    by: Karmen Nava from: Northern Mexico
    July 04, 2012 6:00 AM
    I hate to inform you Nate, there is not any country in the world who does not have this same corruption. Some countries might convince their people that corruption does not exist, but if everyone is investigated, the rate of honesty is almost nil. We just have to concentrate on what each one of us can contribute individually to our communities. Lopez Obrador could also be a disappointment, after all he is not the Messiah and he is not realistic about the emerging global unity of all the nations. I believe Lopez Obrador would create an international crisis for the country of Mexico. I believe Lopez Obrador is not realistic and a bit egocentric to think he could be the only political giant in the history of mankind. The new president has to deal not only with Mexico, but with the USA and other countries as well. Mexico is not really a sovereign nation.

    by: Pete from: Mexico City
    July 02, 2012 2:50 PM
    The old PRI guard (president and military) protected and coordinated the drug cartels. In the end Mexicans abhor Americans and will, in the long run, populate the US and make the Gringos drug addicts. They are after all already the biggest drug consumers in the world.

    In Response

    by: Manuel from: Mexico
    July 03, 2012 3:12 PM
    Don´t be stupid, next time post something that actually makes sense, no just your dreams.
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