News / Americas

Pena Nieto Wins Mexican Presidential Election, Runner-Up Charges Fraud

Presidential candidate Enrique Pena Nieto speaks to supporters at his party's headquarters in Mexico City, Mexico, July 2, 2012.
Presidential candidate Enrique Pena Nieto speaks to supporters at his party's headquarters in Mexico City, Mexico, July 2, 2012.
VOA News
Voters in Mexico have chosen to bring the country's once dominant political party back into power by electing Enrique Pena Nieto as their next president.

With 98 percent of the votes counted, Pena Nieto has 38 percent while former Mexico City Mayor Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has 31 percent.

Who is Enrique Peña Nieto?

  • A member of the Institutional Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Institucional, PRI) since 1984
  • Drew national attention as governor of the State of Mexico from 2005 to 2011
  • Built his reputation by making "pledges" to the State of Mexico, focusing on public works and infrastructure improvement
  • Ranked among country's most handsome politicians
  • Married Televisa soap star Angelica Rivera in 2010
  • Admitted that he had affairs and fathered two children during his first marriage to Monica Pretelini Saenz
Obrador calls the results fraudulent and something no one can accept. His left-wing party will decide whether to formally challenge the results after all votes are counted.

Obrador is accusing Pena Nieto's party, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, of buying votes, and says Mexico's news media gave favorable coverage to the PRI, helping to tilt the election in the party's favor.

Obrador says he will challenge the results once they become official, but will not say if he will call for street protests similar to those he led in 2006, when he narrowly lost to outgoing President Felipe Calderon.

U.S. President Barack Obama called Pena Nieto to congratulate him and offer U.S. support in meeting mutual goals.

Pena Nieto told supporters that Mexicans have voted for a change in direction, but he vowed to keep pressure on drug cartels.

"The fight against crime will continue with a new strategy to reduce violence and protect the lives of Mexicans," he said. "Let it be clear, with organized crime there will be no pacts or truce."

Nieto's conservative Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) ruled Mexico for 71 years until 2000, when voters elected National Action Party (PAN) candidate Vicente Fox. Outgoing President Felipe Calderon also represents PAN. His administration has been plagued by economic stagnation and rampant drug violence.

Calderon deployed the military to fight the drug cartels shortly after he took office in 2006. More than 50,000 people have been killed.

The PAN candidate in this year's election, Josefina Vazquez Mota, finished third in the voting.

  • Enrique Pena Nieto, presidential candidate for the Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI), left, speaks to supporters accompanied by his wife Angelica Rivera at the party's headquarters in Mexico City, early Monday, July 2, 2012.
  • Enrique Pena Nieto greets supporters after exit polls showed him in first place, in Mexico City, July 1, 2012.
  • Supporters of Enrique Pena Nieto celebrate at party headquarters as exit polls begin to come in, Mexico City, July 1, 2012.
  • Supporters of Enrique Pena Nieto celebrate at the PRI party headquarters as results begin to come in on the general elections in Mexico City, July 1, 2012.
  • Supporters of Enrique Pena Nieto gather at their party's headquarters in Mexico City, Mexico, July 1, 2012.
  • residential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of the Democratic Revolution Party (PRD) speaks in Mexico City, July 1, 2012.



Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.
 

You May Like

Video One Year After Thai Coup, No End in Sight for Military Rule

Since carrying out the May 22, 2014 coup, the general has retired from the military but is still firmly in charge More

Goodbye, New York

This is what the fastest-growing big cities in America have in common More

Job-Seeking Bangladeshis Risk Lives to Find Work

The number of Bangladeshi migrants on smugglers’ boats bound for Southeast Asian countries has soared in the past two years More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
 Previous    
by: Fany from: Mexico City
July 02, 2012 2:09 PM
The preliminary results are altered. We went out to take photographs of voting booths' results, and not all match with IFE's pre-resutls. They've been altered to give this man votes.

He has not won yet. This time, we cannot sit back and say 'they were planning this all along, and there's nothing we can do'. Else, we deserve what's in store with him.

by: Erik from: Toluca
July 02, 2012 11:19 AM
if America was not so inconsistent there will be no drug war for a goddamn plant in my country!
In Response

by: ModerateRep from: US
July 02, 2012 3:54 PM
You have a good point. However, there are 13 million illegal immigrants that are causing a large portion of this demand as well.
In Response

by: Harry Kuheim from: USA
July 02, 2012 3:41 PM
Illegals grow pot in US National Forests now... not in Mexico. I wonder how many Illegals from Guatemala in Mexico Voted yesterday? Obama wants them to Vote here for him...why can't we Vote there?

by: Alex from: Ontario
July 02, 2012 9:34 AM
" Pena Nieto's party has "always been close" to the cartels and that he is in the best position to strike a deal to stabilize the killings."

So this is the political arm of organized crime?
No wonder Canadians are going elsewhere to vacation.

In Response

by: Anonymous
July 02, 2012 4:40 PM
glad Canadians are not going to Mexico, they hardly spent any money there anyway. good riddance.

by: Vickie from: Tennessee
July 02, 2012 8:48 AM
Great, are they going to come get their welfare class now?
In Response

by: Chris from: Los Angeles
July 02, 2012 3:14 PM
Hey Anne. Why don't you take your own brand racism and intolerance from your lily-white enclave of Seattle and move south of the border, or just here to LA. You're not that important.
In Response

by: Anne from: Seattle
July 02, 2012 10:42 AM
What does that comment even mean? I love the USA it is my country, but because of our own problems here, such as racism, many people even with permission to be here are electing to return to Mexico. Don't think that everyone wants to be here. We are not that important--really.

by: DC from: AZ
July 02, 2012 8:16 AM
I read novel that said Mexican Presidents are so crooked, you ca n not buy them; You can only rent them.
In Response

by: Roberto from: Toronto
July 02, 2012 10:28 AM
Mexicans are as brainwashed as the Americans, they get fooled by politicians who do nothing but rip them off and sell their souls to de zionist devils.

Anybody trying to fix thing up and treaten to clean up the corrupted system they enjoy is satanized.

Well, the media mafia has triumph again and Mexico will continue to go downhill.

Sad to see.
In Response

by: Darr247 from: USA
July 02, 2012 9:54 AM
@VS - start talking to your friends about pushing for Mexico to add 30 stars to the USA flag. It would solve the "illegal immigration" and "the wall" problems instantly, and I think it'd be great to move all the border agents from the US/MX border north about a thousand miles to keep those lazy socialist Canucks out (I presume MX already has border agents along the Guatemala/Belize borders).

Just kidding, Canadians. :-)

But not about Mexico's states joining the USA. Seriously.
In Response

by: VS from: Mexico City
July 02, 2012 9:04 AM
You are so right! Believe and remember me when I say that this guy is going to be the worst president in Mexico's modern history. Do not think that because he won, we (mexicans) are happy; specially in Mexico City where Lopez-Obrador won. In Mexico there are more than 2 parties, he only won with 37 points (37% of all voters) and no second rounds. Almost all academics and students are against him.
Comments page of 2
 Previous    

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthroughi
X
May 22, 2015 10:23 AM
Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Turkey's Main Opposition Party Hopes for Election Breakthrough

Turkey’s main opposition Republican People’s Party has sought an image change ahead of the June 7 general election. The move comes after suffering successive defeats at the hands of the Islamist-rooted AK Party, which has portrayed it as hostile to religion. Dorian Jones reports from the western city of Izmir.
Video

Video Europe Follows US Lead in Tackling ‘Conflict Minerals’

Metals mined from conflict zones in places like the Democratic Republic of Congo are often sold by warlords to buy weapons. This week European lawmakers voted to force manufacturers to prove that their supply chains are not inadvertently fueling conflicts and human rights abuses. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Class Tackles Questions of Race, Discrimination

Unrest in some U.S. cities is more than just a trending news item at Ladue Middle School in St. Louis, Missouri. As VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, it’s a focus of a multicultural studies class engaging students in wide-ranging discussions about racial tensions and police aggression.
Video

Video Mind-Controlled Prosthetics Are Getting Closer

Scientists and engineers are making substantial advances towards the ultimate goal in prosthetics – creation of limbs that can be controlled by the wearer’s mind. Thanks to sophisticated sensors capable of picking up the brain’s signals, an amputee in Iceland is literally bringing us one step closer to that goal. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Afghan Economy Sinks As Foreign Troops Depart

As international troops prepare to leave Afghanistan, and many foreign aid groups follow, Afghans are grappling with how the exodus will affect the country's fragile economy. Ayesha Tanzeem reports from the Afghan capital, Kabul.
Video

Video Poverty, Ignorance Force Underage Girls Into Marriage

The recent marriage of a 17-year old Chechen girl to a local police chief who was 30 years older and already had a wife caused an outcry in Russia and beyond. The bride was reportedly forced to marry and her parents were intimidated into giving their consent. The union spotlighted yet again the plight of many underage girls in developing countries. Zlatica Hoke reports poverty, ignorance and fear are behind the practice, especially in Asia and Africa.
Video

Video South Korea Marks Gwangju Uprising Anniversary

South Korea this week marked the 35th anniversary of a protest that turned deadly. The Gwangju Uprising is credited with starting the country’s democratic revolution after it was violently quelled by South Korea’s former military rulers. But as Jason Strother reports, some observers worry that democracy has recently been eroded.
Video

Video California’s Water System Not Created To Handle Current Drought

The drought in California is moving into its fourth year. While the state's governor is mandating a reduction in urban water use, most of the water used in California is for agriculture. But both city dwellers and farmers are feeling the impact of the drought. Some experts say the state’s water system was not created to handle long periods of drought. Elizabeth Lee reports from Ventura County, an agricultural region just northwest of Los Angeles.
Video

Video How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of De-Extinction

An international team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of the woolly mammoth. Led by the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, the work opens the door to recreate the huge herbivore, which last roamed the Earth 4,000 years ago. VOA’s Rosanne Skirble considers the science of de-extinction and its place on the planet
Video

Video Blind Boy Defines His Life with Music

Cole Moran was born blind. He also has cognitive delays and other birth defects. He has to learn everything by ear. Nevertheless, the 12-year-old has had an insatiable love for music since he was born. VOA’s June Soh introduces us to the young phenomenal harmonica player.

VOA Blogs

More Americas News

Pope Beatifies Murdered Salvadoran Archbishop

Hundreds of thousands of worshippers converge on Salvadoran capital to witness papal declaration for late Oscar Romero - now one step from Roman Catholic sainthood
More

Scores Killed in Western Mexico Gunfight

Officials say almost every person killed in Michoacan state shootout was a suspected gang member
More

Latest US-Cuban Talks Ends in Washington

Both sides cite progress on restoring diplomatic ties, but no final agreement reached
More

Tutu Lends Support to Age Campaign

Help Age International has launched Action 2015 campaign
More

Colombia Kills 18 FARC Rebels

The bombing raid took place in the Cauca region of western Colombia
More

Lawmakers Question Normalization Effort With Cuba

On eve of next round of US-Cuba talks, Senator Bob Menendez calls engagement 'one-sided'
More