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N.Korean Nuclear Test Prompts Wave of International Condemnation

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Governments and leaders from around the world are condemning North Korea, which conducted a long-threatened third nuclear test on Tuesday.

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon condemned the move as "deeply destabilizing." He says it is a "clear and grave violation" of sanctions banning Pyongyang from nuclear and missile tests.

U.S. President Barack Obama called the test "highly provocative." In a statement, he said it undermines regional stability and will not make North Korea safer. He called for "swift and credible" international action in response.

Even China, North Korea's main ally, expressed what it called "firm opposition" to the test. Beijing's foreign ministry urged Pyongyang to abide by its non-nuclear commitment, saying the issue should be resolved in the framework of long-stalled, six-nation de-nuclearization talks.

South Korea called the test "an unacceptable threat to peace and stability" and a "head-on challenge" to the international community. Seoul says Foreign Minister Kim Sung-hwan agreed with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry during a telephone call to take "swift and unified action" at the U.N. Security Council, which is meeting later Tuesday to discuss the test.

In Japan, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Tokyo would also consider its own new sanctions against North Korea in response to the test, which he called "extremely regrettable."

British Foreign Minister William Hague says his country will push for a "robust response" to the North Korean test at the Security Council.

Moscow also "decisively" condemned the test as a violation of North Korea's international obligations.

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