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    IAEA Unlikely to Send Delegation to North Korea

    The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations says the world body stands ready to take further action against North Korea if that country continues to pursue missile launches or nuclear tests.

    Speaking to reporters Wednesday, Susan Rice said the United Nations' recent statement condemning North Korea's failed missile launch attempt is a "strong and united determination" that further acts will not be tolerated.

    "One would hope against past precedent that the leadership in North Korea will see the wisdom of not pursuing further provocations and will recognize that the history of their pursuit of these further provocations is North Korea’s increasing isolation and increasing pressure from the international community," Rice said.

    Her comments follow an announcement by the International Atomic Energy Agency that it is unlikely to send a delegation to North Korea, after Pyongyang stated it is no longer bound by an agreement with the United States not to test missiles and nuclear devices.

    On Tuesday, Pyongyang said it was breaking off a bilateral agreement to halt its nuclear activities and allow IAEA inspectors to enter the country after the United States suspended much needed food aid.  Rice reiterated that the suspension of food aid was a direct result of North Korea carrying out its failed launch on Friday, thus violating the agreement.

    "They went ahead and launched the missiles, and so we made clear that there will be no food aid and that from a practical point of view that agreement is not operational since they went ahead and violated it and announced that they intended to violate it merely a few weeks after it was signed," she said.

    North Korea's Foreign Ministry vowed to continue trying to fire a long-range rocket into space to place what it said was a weather satellite into orbit.  It also vowed unspecified retaliation now that the agreement with the U.S. is no longer in place.

    Former CIA Director Michael Hayden said he is concerned the country's new leader, Kim Jong Un, may feel pressured to solidify his power with an additional provocative act.

    "We have seen this pattern in the past - where they have a missile launch, the rest of the world has responded, and rather than compromise and negotiate, the North has taken another provocative action.  And in two instances, the provocative action has been an attempt at a nuclear test.  So I fear that this is the course of action they may be on," Mayden said.

    North Korea on Tuesday rejected the U.N. Security Council's condemnation of the failed launch.  The council ordered a tightening of sanctions aimed at preventing North Korea from developing and exporting nuclear and missile technology.  

    North Korea insists it was within its legal rights when it launched the rocket last week.  The rocket broke apart and fell into the Yellow Sea.  The launch prompted criticism from the United Nations, long-time North Korean ally China, the United States, Japan, and the European Union.  Critics accused the North of using the satellite scenario as a cover for testing ballistic missile technology banned under United Nations resolutions.

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    by: new_york_loner
    April 19, 2012 2:19 AM
    Israel's alarmist rhetoric and sabre rattling about Iran's alleged nuclear program has been a dangerous distraction from dealing with real, honest to goodness, threats to world peace from rogue nuclear powers like the N Koreans and the Pakistanis.....with the IAEA, it's all about doing what Israel demands...that's the number one priority, all else fades into insignificance.

    Israel is a nuclear scofflaw state....why do these outlaws get to call the shots with the IAEA, the US and the UN?

    by: GY
    April 18, 2012 10:22 PM
    When India takes the same action,:nuclear , rockets,missiles;where is the condemning of USA ,where is the sanction of United Nations?The number of starving people in India is much larger then NK ,so give an answer! Is the India government is more cooperative or obedient ?

    by: nick
    April 18, 2012 5:46 PM
    It is North Korea's obiligation to enhance their power against intruders

    by: Richard
    April 18, 2012 10:26 AM
    Funny how North Korea claims that NOW they are pulling out of the agreement when they kept the agreement for only a few days and broke it by launching a balistic missile and set up a nuclear test. Seems that they don't know what the origional deal was about at all. Is the new leader of NK retarded in some way?

    by: Scott
    April 18, 2012 7:44 AM
    The US pulling out of the agreement shouldn't be put on the US's shoulders about people starving. It's not the USA's job to feed the world. It's North Korea's job to feed it's own people instead of spending everything they have on the military and the crazy leadership. In my opinion the US Govt is crazy for even trying to deal with these people. The world shouldn't give them a thing excect for shelter when the leadershop crashes.

    by: Don
    April 18, 2012 6:53 AM
    I agree that we should punish the top rulers of NK, but, is it right that we allow this act to have the PEOPLE starve because the US government has cut off the needed food supply? Where is our compassion for the people there?

    by: NVO
    April 18, 2012 6:34 AM
    Where is all the FAKE crying now, for your SUPREME BUFFOON? Foolish, foolish tyranical regime. Where is all the FAKE crying now?

    by: michael
    April 18, 2012 5:46 AM
    The rocket failure shows as proof that natural obstructions are beyond the North, or anyone's, control. The conclusion to these policies will have unforeseen events involved one way or another for all involved

    by: Derp
    April 18, 2012 5:14 AM
    Crackheads and the unrelization of the NK that could "Destroy us all".

    by: jack
    April 18, 2012 4:42 AM
    mini-Kim plots in his evil lair how to dominate the world....
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