News / Asia

N. Korea Enters 'State of War' Against South

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) presides over an urgent operation meeting on the Korean People's Army Strategic Rocket Force's performance of duty for firepower strike, at the Supreme Command in Pyongyang, March 29, 2013.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) presides over an urgent operation meeting on the Korean People's Army Strategic Rocket Force's performance of duty for firepower strike, at the Supreme Command in Pyongyang, March 29, 2013.
VOA News
North Korea says it has entered what it calls a "state of war" against its southern neighbor.

In a statement carried by the North's official Korean Central News Agency [KCNA] on Saturday, Pyongyang said "all issues raised between the North and the South will be handled accordingly."

North Korea has been threatening to attack the South and U.S. military bases almost on a daily basis since the beginning of March.

On Friday, tens of thousands of North Koreans held a huge rally in support their leader's threat of a possible military strike against the United States.  

Soldiers, workers and students marched through Kim Il Sung square in Pyongyang. The North's leader, Kim Jong Un, was not present.

The rally came after Kim Jong Un ordered preparations for rocket strikes on the U.S. mainland and American military bases in South Korea, Guam and Hawaii.

The KCNA said the leader put his rocket units on standby Friday, after a emergency meeting with top army commanders. He said the "time has come to settle accounts" with the United States.

A South Korean military source later told VOA an increased movement of soldiers and vehicles had been detected at North Korean rocket sites.

Kim Jong Un's announcement Friday came after nuclear-capable U.S. B-2 stealth bombers flew over an island Thursday off the coast of the Korean peninsula. The maneuver was part of ongoing military drills with South Korea.

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel linked the B-2 flights to recent North Korean provocations, which include threats of nuclear strikes on South Korea, and the U.S. and its Pacific allies.

In Moscow, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov warned a buildup of tensions on the Korean peninsula could "spiral into a vicious cycle," and he urged all sides involved in the standoff to calm down.

Lavrov also said Russia is concerned about increased military activity around North Korea, an apparent reference to the U.S.-South Korean military drills.

Analysts say Pyongyang is not yet capable of mounting an operational nuclear warhead on a missile. But many of its neighbors are worried they may be easier targets for the North's conventional weapons.

  • North Koreans attend a rally in support of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un's order to put its missile units on standby in preparation for a possible war against the U.S. and South Korea, Pyongyang, March 29, 2013.
  • University students punch the air as they march through Kim Il Sung Square in downtown Pyongyang, North Korea, March 29, 2013.
  • South Korean soldiers prepare for a military exercise, Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, March 29, 2013.
  • A U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber flies near Osan U.S. Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, South Korea, March 28, 2013.
  • South Korean vehicles return from a joint industrial complex at the North Korean city of Kaesong as a U.S. Army soldier watches at the customs, immigration and quarantine office, near the Demilitarized Zone, March 28, 2013.
  • South Korean army soldiers patrol along a barbed-wire fence near the border village of Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea, March 27, 2013.
  • A man walks past propaganda posters that threaten punishment to the "U.S. imperialists and their allies," Pyongyang, North Korea, March 26, 2013.
  • Soldiers of the Korean People's Army take part in landing and anti-landing drills in the eastern sector of the front and the east coastal area, North Korea, March 25, 2013.
  • North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un talks with generals as soldiers of the Korean People's Army take part in landing and anti-landing drills in eastern North Korea, March 25, 2013.

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by: angelina from: las vegas
April 01, 2013 4:05 AM
North Korea have full right to update all its defense technologies and to acquire nukes if USA want clean and transparent justice so USA and israel should take a start to finish all of its nukes first and stop interfering in others matters for several hidden dirty desires every where.


by: Althof from: Surabaya, Indonesia
March 31, 2013 2:28 AM
I think it is normal if the North preparing his weapons against his neighbor because his neighbor's alliance always tries to "disturb" him
and if the war is started, it will be good for the south alliance to sweep the North down
but, honestly, please choose the peaceful way


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
March 30, 2013 7:37 PM
I think it is our democratic nations' mission to set North Korean peope free from thought and information controls by a dictator and vested interests. I know former west Germany has been making great efforts to get along with former east German peope. Communistic thiking way and life style would not be changed easily. But I am sure North Korean people are deligent and hardworkers after both Koreas are reunited only if they are granted freedom.


by: mike from: USA
March 30, 2013 10:36 AM
I think the two Koreas reuniting would be just as bad as a war. Imagine the amount of money to be spent and refugees to care for if the two united... You could compare this to East Berlin but at least they were not as far behind to the West as the North is now to the South...

In Response

by: mike from: USA
March 31, 2013 7:51 PM
I'm sorry but that isnt selfish, its called reality. You can't just go stepping into another country expecting to save it without something in return. What kind of resources would the south gain from doing something like this? Sure some land and minerals probably but then theres the cost of training those people to contemporary standards. Yes, maybe that sounds a bit harsh saying to train them so let me make it simplier: train = jobs. They will need jobs to survive.

Search "How Reunification Cost Is Calculated" on google and the first link will go a further deeper on this issue; that was about 2 minutes of research, if you really want further facts I can dig back into my uni days and pull up essays about the cost of reuniting the east with the west. And yes I know the DDR, I was giving a simple example of east and west.

In Response

by: saucymugwump from: USA
March 31, 2013 4:14 PM
What an amazingly selfish and ignorant thing to write! Korean children are suffering stunted growth because of lack of food, but all you can think about is the cost to feed them.

By the way, Berlin was not the only part of Germany occupied by the Soviets. Ever hear of the DDR?

In Response

by: Anonymous
March 30, 2013 6:03 PM
The rich South can afford reunification with the poor North.
Problem is Kim Yong Un doesn't want to lose his job.


by: Sasanka Sekhar Singha
March 30, 2013 9:40 AM
The north Korean central news agency (K C N A ) says it has entered a state of war against neighbor. Since march----North Korea has been threatening the south Korea and U S military bases. Tens of thousand of north Korea marched through Kim 11 Sung square in Pyongyang. In Moscow----Russian foreign minister warned concerned on the Korean Peninsula and urged both sides to clam down. Many neighbors countries are worried about they have targets for north Korea's weapons.


by: Anonymous
March 30, 2013 2:49 AM
War is not good thing.


by: Me
March 30, 2013 12:59 AM
Those poor people.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
March 30, 2013 12:55 AM
Devided Korean peninshua is the last remnant of cold war. It should be re-united for the hapiness of all Krean people. How could it be achieved? Like German case with the expansiion of democracy owing to Perestroika by Gorbachov?, or like Vietnam by the battle and winning of one side?

I suppose Korea would be re-united by surrender of North to South with a small millitary support from US. It seems would not happen China and Russia support North Korea because cold war has been ended quite before and they do not expect any benefits from supporting North.


by: sean from: vancouver
March 30, 2013 12:49 AM
Those guys sure have a lot of medals on their uniforms for not ever being in a war.


by: Naomi Spellman
March 30, 2013 12:49 AM
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

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