News / Asia

N. Korea Enters 'State of War' Against South

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) presides over an urgent operation meeting on the Korean People's Army Strategic Rocket Force's performance of duty for firepower strike, at the Supreme Command in Pyongyang, March 29, 2013.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (C) presides over an urgent operation meeting on the Korean People's Army Strategic Rocket Force's performance of duty for firepower strike, at the Supreme Command in Pyongyang, March 29, 2013.
VOA News
North Korea says it has entered what it calls a "state of war" against its southern neighbor.

In a statement carried by the North's official Korean Central News Agency [KCNA] on Saturday, Pyongyang said "all issues raised between the North and the South will be handled accordingly."

North Korea has been threatening to attack the South and U.S. military bases almost on a daily basis since the beginning of March.

On Friday, tens of thousands of North Koreans held a huge rally in support their leader's threat of a possible military strike against the United States.  

Soldiers, workers and students marched through Kim Il Sung square in Pyongyang. The North's leader, Kim Jong Un, was not present.

The rally came after Kim Jong Un ordered preparations for rocket strikes on the U.S. mainland and American military bases in South Korea, Guam and Hawaii.

The KCNA said the leader put his rocket units on standby Friday, after a emergency meeting with top army commanders. He said the "time has come to settle accounts" with the United States.

A South Korean military source later told VOA an increased movement of soldiers and vehicles had been detected at North Korean rocket sites.

Kim Jong Un's announcement Friday came after nuclear-capable U.S. B-2 stealth bombers flew over an island Thursday off the coast of the Korean peninsula. The maneuver was part of ongoing military drills with South Korea.

U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel linked the B-2 flights to recent North Korean provocations, which include threats of nuclear strikes on South Korea, and the U.S. and its Pacific allies.

In Moscow, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov warned a buildup of tensions on the Korean peninsula could "spiral into a vicious cycle," and he urged all sides involved in the standoff to calm down.

Lavrov also said Russia is concerned about increased military activity around North Korea, an apparent reference to the U.S.-South Korean military drills.

Analysts say Pyongyang is not yet capable of mounting an operational nuclear warhead on a missile. But many of its neighbors are worried they may be easier targets for the North's conventional weapons.

  • North Koreans attend a rally in support of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un's order to put its missile units on standby in preparation for a possible war against the U.S. and South Korea, Pyongyang, March 29, 2013.
  • University students punch the air as they march through Kim Il Sung Square in downtown Pyongyang, North Korea, March 29, 2013.
  • South Korean soldiers prepare for a military exercise, Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, March 29, 2013.
  • A U.S. Air Force B-2 stealth bomber flies near Osan U.S. Air Base in Pyeongtaek, south of Seoul, South Korea, March 28, 2013.
  • South Korean vehicles return from a joint industrial complex at the North Korean city of Kaesong as a U.S. Army soldier watches at the customs, immigration and quarantine office, near the Demilitarized Zone, March 28, 2013.
  • South Korean army soldiers patrol along a barbed-wire fence near the border village of Panmunjom in Paju, South Korea, March 27, 2013.
  • A man walks past propaganda posters that threaten punishment to the "U.S. imperialists and their allies," Pyongyang, North Korea, March 26, 2013.
  • Soldiers of the Korean People's Army take part in landing and anti-landing drills in the eastern sector of the front and the east coastal area, North Korea, March 25, 2013.
  • North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un talks with generals as soldiers of the Korean People's Army take part in landing and anti-landing drills in eastern North Korea, March 25, 2013.

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by: JKF from: Ottawa, Canada
March 29, 2013 5:44 PM
Just imagine how crazy and belligerant they will be, once they get launchable nuclear weapons that can actually reach North America.


by: Haron from: Afghanistan
March 29, 2013 1:33 PM
@ Michael... you said well. why the USA lost their moral? because USA did lots of mistake in Afghanistan. once upon a time Afghanistan was alone with 1 million of Terrorists, AL-Qaeda and Taliban. they fought 6 years and three months by 24/7 and most of people had stimuli against insurgency. but, today USA, NATO and ISAF kneel to militants. so how you expect that world should not fight with USA, NATO or ISAF. anyone who could be fail in Afghanistan can be defeat in the world. as Russia, German, UK, Pakistan and Iran.

In Response

by: Richard L. Provencher from: Truro, Nova Scotia, Canad
March 30, 2013 8:30 AM
You are so right Haron. But operating the planes and ships to help other countries is so expensive. A calculation was one trillion dollars spent by the USA to help Afghanistan AND Iraq. These costs crippled the USA economically, in my estimation. Canada spent ten billion in Afghanistan to help the people. That is a lot of money. Now it is time for the Afghan people to take control of their country.

In Response

by: Erik P from: UK
March 30, 2013 6:47 AM
Yep, just poor foreign policy decisions. N Korea was developing nuclear weapons whilst the US were invading Iraq, and everyone knew, but they did nothing about it at the time. One of the reasons that the UN let the massacre in Rwanda happen, is because they made a mess in Somalia. Basically, situations have to be treated for what they are, and not what happened previously to another country. We all know that N Korea is just trying to flex its muscles, and the US could use this as a good opportunity to show the N Korean public that the government is not as strong as it thinks it is. If it was me, I would completely ignore N Korea, like they are a fly to be swatted.


by: USMC from: USA
March 29, 2013 1:32 PM
this is a lesson we would profit by in reference to Iran...!!! I say, Obama, unleash Israel on the revolting Mullahs...!!!

In Response

by: David from: US
March 30, 2013 6:49 AM
Iran is far different than NK. Iran has an ancient culture which they value highly, and so can be deterred.

NK on the other hand (as to some extent Pakistan, Saudi, and most other wahabi influenced nations) cannot be deterred much.


by: George Douglas from: Fairplain
March 29, 2013 1:19 PM
The foolish kid that rules North Korea thinks he is playing a video game. It is time for the USA, Japan, Australia, and South Korea to take him and his army out in one huge attack to stop his nonsense. Then, maybe the people of North Korea can be free and live like those in South Korea. The world has put up with the North Korean government's and the Iranian government's evil threats much too long. Take them out!!!


by: Jonathan Huang from: canada
March 29, 2013 1:18 PM
huge difference, In Syria people kill each other, in north Africa, countries are in riot. but In NK, people unit and fight against the outside threat. We might not agree with their policy but we have to agree that their organized their country well. This kind of countries are what US scared of, like Taliban, they are undefeatable. When they have strong belief and are united, US has to retreat. That is what happened in Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan.

In Response

by: Richard L. Provencher from: Nova Scotia, Canada
March 30, 2013 8:37 AM
to Jonathan H. Not too many years ago, the USA sent North Korea ten billion dollars worth of food stuffs to keep the regime from turning their eyes to atomic weapons. Obviously helping the two million starving population at the time did nothing to convince NC of their friendship.


by: adipocere from: Alabama
March 29, 2013 1:09 PM
Has it ever occurred to Americans that perhaps North Korea is not the belligerent one here? Western media is working overtime to portray NK as being the aggressors, but the US and UN are the ones starving them, isolating them and now threatening them with nuclear bombs. This is insane, and if you genuinely support the US or it's puppet UN in regards to NK, then you are either stupid or evil.

In Response

by: Cam from: US
March 30, 2013 5:02 PM
Yes, you're right. Everyone else in the world is crazy and North Korea is the sane one.


by: Duncan McNeil from: USA
March 29, 2013 11:04 AM
This behavior is what appeasement brings. Clinton put off the day of reckoning with bribes of aid and now the tyrants that run this train wreck of a country DEMAND and extort. It's time for that to end.


by: michael from: usa
March 29, 2013 11:03 AM
i wish the usa would stop there bully the world and bring our troops home. we do not need this war it will start civil war and the fall of humanity. The usa has became one of the worst country in the world and it seem's like nobody care here in the usa we are going to be the ones who suffer, we need to call our troops home and leave everybody else alone. (Demon's live in the usa) and most of them are our leader's.

In Response

by: Joshua from: USA
March 29, 2013 2:37 PM
The above post's grammar needs some work. Is the author living in the USA? Accusing our leaders of being demons seems awfully close to hate speech to me. I hope the author read the forum rules prior to posting.
Calling our troops home would certainly save military expenses. Does this include calling them home from allied countries - e.g. South Korea? I am curious as to what the alternative to direct exposure to our allies' cultures in training our personnel in appreciation of foreign cultures would be.
Finally, leaving other countries alone is not necessarily in our interest. Pursuing our interests is in our interest. It is true that bullying others is not in our interest. It is also true that when others threaten missile strikes on us then responding IS in our interest.

In Response

by: George Douglas from: USA
March 29, 2013 1:24 PM
michael, as a veteran and a patriot of our great country I find your comments offensive and ignorant. Move to North Korea or Iran if you dislike our country so much. People like you, who I suspect have never served a day to defend our rights and freedom, are a cancer on our great nation. You embarrass American citizens with your slandering remarks about the USA.


by: Ying Thooj
March 29, 2013 10:37 AM
This situation is Russia and China behind them, China and Russia want peace or not? why support the babe Kim to beginning WW3?
you can see Syria, Russia and China behind them and support terrorist too.

In Response

by: tswv vaj yaj from: usa
March 29, 2013 4:19 PM
i agree with Mr. thoj remember Russia and china is a partner and
communist country, there is no way China will abandon NK do you know who push NK threat USA and the SK there should have some one back- up let's compare NK to German WW2 who is better if i'm a man or a leader my country, i will not let someone threat me like that anytime you say please and please to them
how can you be a leader, you may obey them all time, right or
wrong is up to you thinking.

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