News / USA

Obama Promotes Jobs Bill, Attacks Republican Policies

President Barack Obama speaks at the 41st Annual Legislative Conference Phoenix Awards Dinner sponsored by the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc. Sept. 24, 2011
President Barack Obama speaks at the 41st Annual Legislative Conference Phoenix Awards Dinner sponsored by the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc. Sept. 24, 2011

In a series of political fundraising events in U.S. western states in recent days, President Barack Obama has made some of his sharpest comments yet about Republican positions on the economy, as he adopts more of a fiery persona campaigning for re-election next year.  Mr. Obama also continues to promote his economic growth proposals and increase pressure on Congress to pass a key jobs bill.

In a recent address to the organization representing African-American members of Congress, and continuing through seven fundraising events in the western states of Washington and California, a new Barack Obama was on display. "I'm going to press on for the sake of all those families who are struggling right now.  I don’t have time to feel sorry for myself.  I don’t have time to complain.  I am going to press on," he said.

His remarks to the Congressional Black Caucus were aimed at firing up an important part of his political base, one that has suffered sharp effects of the recent recession.

Mr. Obama noted that unemployment for blacks stands at nearly 17 percent - the highest in nearly three decades, with almost 40 percent of African-American children living in poverty.  The overall U.S. poverty rate now exceeds 15 percent, the highest in 18 years.

The president followed that speech with a three-day trip through the American West, partly for campaigning and partly for policy promotion - to visit the states of Washington, California and Colorado, which he won in the November 2008 presidential election.

At one event, covered only by the print media, he made some of his sharpest remarks yet about Republican policies, and about Republican candidates seeking their party's nomination.

Mr. Obama acknowledged disillusionment with government as a new Gallup poll showed a record 81 percent of Americans, including Democrats and Republicans, are dissatisfied.

But he said if Americans choose the alternative to re-electing him as president, they would bring "an approach to government that will fundamentally cripple America in meeting the challenges of the 21st century."

Mr. Obama aimed some criticism directly at Rick Perry, the Texas governor whose performance in recent Republican debates, according to political analysts, has hurt his position in the Republican field.

The president also used his trip out West to urge Americans to press Congress to approve his $447 billion jobs bill, known as the American Jobs Act, and to promote long-term deficit and debt reduction proposals that call for wealthier Americans to pay more in taxes.

Increasingly, he makes this response to counter assertions by Republicans that he has engaged in "class warfare" by proposing higher taxes for the rich to help raise revenues. "If asking a billionaire to pay the same tax rate as a janitor makes me a warrior for the working class, I wear that with a badge of honor.  I have no problem with that," he said.

In his latest use of social media, the president used a town hall meeting in Mountain View, California to answer questions from some among 250 people in a studio audience, and from online users of the LinkedIn professional network.

This was part of Mr. Obama's response to an African-American man who lost his job after 22 years in the information technology field. "Economies all around the world are not growing as fast as they need to and since the world is really interconnected, that effects us as well.  The encouraging thing for you is that when the economy gets back on track in the ways that it should, you are going to be prepared to be successful," he said.

Mr. Obama's trip out West ends with a visit to a school in Denver, Colorado where he will again promote his jobs legislation that proposes to modernize 35,000 schools across the country.

He returns to a Washington facing the latest example of the political brinksmanship he has criticized so vehemently, as a divided Congress worked to overcome an impasse over a short-term spending bill needed to keep the federal government operating into mid-November.  The current fiscal year ends September 30, and without passage of a continuing resolution, there will be a partial shutdown of the government.

You May Like

Karzai's Legacy: Missed Opportunities?

Afghanistan's president leaves behind a much different nation than the one he inherited, yet his legacy from 13 years in power is getting mixed reviews More

Video Secret Service Chief Under Fire for White House Security Breach

Julia Pierson faces tough questions from lawmakers after recent intrusion at White House, says: 'It is clear that our security plan was not executed properly' More

Frustrated, Liberian Students Want Ebola Fight Role

Thousands have volunteered to go to counties, rural villages to talk to people in their language about deadly virus More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Malaysia Struggles to Stop People Joining Jihadi
X
Mahi Ramakrishnan
September 30, 2014 2:16 PM
Malaysian authorities say militant groups like the so-called "Islamic State" have used social media to entice at least three dozen Malaysian Muslims to fight in what they call "jihad" in Syria and Iraq. As Mahi Ramkrishnan reports from Kuala Lumpur, counterterrorism police are deeply worried about what could happen when these militants return home.
Video

Video Malaysia Struggles to Stop People Joining Jihad

Malaysian authorities say militant groups like the so-called "Islamic State" have used social media to entice at least three dozen Malaysian Muslims to fight in what they call "jihad" in Syria and Iraq. As Mahi Ramkrishnan reports from Kuala Lumpur, counterterrorism police are deeply worried about what could happen when these militants return home.
Video

Video Could US Have Done More to Stop Rise of Islamic State?

President Obama says airstrikes against Islamic State militants in Syria will likely continue for some time because, in his words, "there is a cancer that has grown for too long." So what if President Obama had acted sooner in Syria to arm more-moderate opponents of both the Islamic State and the Syrian government? VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns reports from the United Nations.
Video

Video Treasure Hunters Seek 'Hidden Treasure' in Central Kenya

Could a cave in a small village in central Kenya be the site of buried treasure? A rumor of riches, left behind by colonialists, has some residents dreaming of wealth, while others see it as a dangerous hoax. VOA's Gabe Joselow has the story.
Video

Video Iran's Rouhani Skeptical on Syria Strikes

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani expressed skepticism Friday that U.S.-led airstrikes in Iraq and Syria could crush Islamic State militants. From New York, VOA’s Margaret Besheer reports the president was also hopeful that questions about Iran’s nuclear program could be resolved soon.
Video

Video US House Speaker: Congress Should Debate Authorization Against IS

As wave after wave of U.S. airstrikes target Islamic State militants, the speaker of the Republican-controlled House of Representatives says he would be willing to call Congress back into session to debate a formal, broad authorization for the use of military force. VOA’s Michael Bowman reports from Washington, where legislators left town 10 days ago for a seven-week recess.
Video

Video Ebola Patients Find No Treatment at Sierra Leone Holding Center

At a holding facility in Makeni, central Sierra Leone, dozens of sick people sit on the floor in an empty university building. They wait in filthy conditions. It's a 16-hour drive by ambulance to Kailahun Ebola treatment center. Adam Bailes was there and reports on what he says are some of the worst situations he has seen since the beginning of this Ebola outbreak. And he says it appears case numbers may already be far worse than authorities acknowledge.
Video

Video Identifying Bodies Found in Texas Border Region

Thousands of immigrants have died after crossing the border from Mexico into remote areas of the southwestern United States in recent years. Local officials in south Texas alone have found hundreds of unidentified bodies and buried them in mass graves in local cemeteries. Now an anthropologist and her students at Baylor University have been exhuming bodies and looking for clues to identify them. VOA’s Greg Flakus has more from Waco, Texas.
Video

Video Ebola Robs Liberians of Chance to Say Good-Bye to Loved Ones

In Liberia, where Ebola has killed more than 1,500 people, authorities have worked hard to convince people to allow specialized burial teams to take away dead bodies. But these safety measures, while necessary, make it hard for people to say good bye to their loved ones. VOA's Anne Look reports on the tragedy from Liberia.
Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.Colonel Steve ‘Spiros’ Pisanos left Greece and came to the U.S. to learn to fly. He flew fighters for the Allies in World War II, narrowly escaping death multiple times.

AppleAndroid