News / Asia

Pakistanis Pray for Recovery of Girl Shot by Taliban

Women supporters of a Pakistani religious group 'Minhaj-ul-Quran' hold a poster of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, 14, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, during a demonstration in Islamabad, Pakistan, Oct. 13, 2012.
Women supporters of a Pakistani religious group 'Minhaj-ul-Quran' hold a poster of schoolgirl Malala Yousufzai, 14, who was shot on Tuesday by the Taliban, during a demonstration in Islamabad, Pakistan, Oct. 13, 2012.
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VOA News
Children in Pakistan and Afghanistan offered prayers Saturday for the recovery of a 14-year-old Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot in the head by the Taliban.

Pakistani Taliban militants shot Malala Yousafzai in the head and neck Tuesday as she left school. The teenager has been internationally recognized for promoting education for girls and documenting Taliban atrocities in the area near her home in Swat Valley.

Prime Minister Raja Pervaiz Ashraf has described the attack on Yousafzai as a "crime against humanity" and an attack on Pakistan's core moral and social values.

Pakistani police arrested several shooting suspects Friday. Officials say the arrests took place in the northwestern Swat Valley where Yousafzai was shot.  

Earlier Friday, a Pakistani military spokesman said Yousafzai is in "satisfactory" condition.  Major General Asim Saleem Bajwa said the next few days will be critical in her recovery. Yousafzai remains unconscious and on a ventilator.

A Taliban spokesman in the Swat Valley said Friday the group's leaders decided a few months ago to kill Yousafzai, and assigned gunmen to carry it out. The Taliban says she is "pro-West," and that she denounced the militant group and called U.S. President Barack Obama her idol.

Yousafzai wrote under a pseudonym, Gul Makai, in a blog published by the BBC. In her blog, Yousufzai described life under the Taliban in 2008 and 2009, when militants carried out beheadings and other violence in the territory they controlled which included large areas of the Swat Valley in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province.

In Geneva Friday, a group of U.N. experts urged Pakistan's government to ensure that school children, particularly girls, are protected in the country, and that extremist groups do not prevent Pakistanis from realizing their human rights. The experts said trying to assassinate a 14-year-old girl who is supporting the rights of girls to receive an education is a "shocking" attack on human rights defenders in Pakistan.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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by: Dian Rohm from: California
October 14, 2012 1:31 AM
If these young girls could be taught basic medicine such as treating wartime injuries and basic infection and disease protocols, it would make them valuable enough that even the Taliban would recognize how stupid it would be to simply kill them.


by: Romildo Caldas from: Brazil
October 13, 2012 10:07 PM
Let's pray for this Angel named Malala. May God gives her health back. Let's eagerly espect her healing. She must complete her Noble Mission.

In Response

by: ElizabethSrikachorn from: Washington DC
October 15, 2012 10:01 AM
The Taliban NOW must realize that Malala is sent by ALLAH ,GOD BUDDHA and all holy spirits ,imagine getting shot on the neck and head and SURVIVE . I WILL BE PRAYING FOR HER ..love you MALALA "U" are the "ONE"


by: Orlando Gonzalez Villazon from: Agustin Codazzi- Cesar
October 13, 2012 6:10 PM
That schoolgirl needs protection for UN, because the Taliban send the other killer to finish the mission kill a teenager, I very thirty and pray for recovery these heroic women.


by: Neal Rudin from: Rochester, NY
October 13, 2012 6:07 PM
This beautiful jewel is healing the whole world with her willingness to sacrifice her life for such an honorable and just cause.
Might this wonderful little girl be a great light upon the world.
Gandhi , Buddha, Jesus and Abraham must be very proud of her.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
October 13, 2012 2:01 PM
May the healing power of the Almighty God encompass Malala, and may His healing rise upon her like the noon day. May her recovery bring total liberation of Pakistan and all places dominated by the iron curtain of forced religion. In Jesus Name I pray. Amen.


by: James Moore from: Boston, USA
October 13, 2012 12:56 PM
This kind of knuckle-dragging brutality will continue until the Pakistanis are WILLING to police themselves.

In Response

by: D-DAY from: The Land Of Freedom
October 14, 2012 1:00 AM
Pakistan does police itself.Where have you been?......duh!


by: Njunaid from: Other side of the Moon
October 13, 2012 10:52 AM
I wonder what the Imam of Mecca and his Masters the Saudi Royal family has to say about this incident and the philosopy behind it.


by: Dawn Berkley
October 13, 2012 10:38 AM
"Pakistanis Pray for Recovery of Girl Shot by Taliban" Wasn't it religion that got the girl shot in the face in the first place?

In Response

by: D-DAY from: The Land of Freedom
October 14, 2012 12:58 AM
No it wasn't religion that got her shot in the face.She stood up for her rights and the rights of other girls to go to school and get an education.The evil of the Taliban and their evil way of thinking was responsible for her attempted murder.The Taliban will rot in hell, that's for sure.


by: Kate from: Washington State USA
October 13, 2012 10:35 AM
Adults and children around the world join to support the recovery of Malala. Here in Washington my students add their best wishes for her recovery and for the cause Malala supports. Education is the great liberator.
Peace to you all.


by: TheDoctor from: Gallifrey
October 13, 2012 10:26 AM
Bring her to the US.

In Response

by: nick from: shanghai
October 13, 2012 8:50 PM
i don't think this girl should be taken to a so-called country.isn't it your interfere to midwest that makes such a chaotic condition?

In Response

by: Martina from: Prague, CZ
October 13, 2012 12:31 PM
EXACTLY - that´s what I´ve been thinking too!

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