News / Asia

Tokyo: 6 Chinese Ships Enter Waters Near Disputed Islands

A group of disputed islands known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen from the city government of Tokyo's survey vessel in the East China Sea, September 2, 2012.
A group of disputed islands known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China is seen from the city government of Tokyo's survey vessel in the East China Sea, September 2, 2012.
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VOA News
Japan says six Chinese patrol ships have entered its territorial waters near disputed islands in the East China Sea, further heightening the tensions over the uninhabited archipelago claimed both by Tokyo and Beijing.

Japan's Coast Guard said two Chinese vessels entered Japanese waters early Friday, and four more vessels arrived soon after.  The Coast Guard says it has issued a warning for them to leave.

China's official news agency, Xinhua, Thursday quoted the Ministry of Agriculture as saying the vessels would be dispatched on routine patrol near the islands to assert China's sovereignty and protect fishermen.

The rocky islets, known as Senkaku in Japan and Diaoyu in China, have been the focus of recurring flare-ups between the two sides.

On Thursday, hundreds of protesters gathered outside the Japanese embassy in Beijing to condemn Japan's move to nationalize the privately owned islands in the resource-rich maritime area.  They called for Japan to leave the uninhabited islands and for a boycott of Japanese products.

Chinese authorities allowed the demonstrations to proceed, although police prevented protesters from getting close to the Japanese embassy compound.

Japan's Kyodo news agency reported that anti-Japan protests also took place in Shanghai and Fuzhou, the capital of Fujian Province.

China's vice commerce minister, Jiang Zengwei, warned Thursday the dispute could affect trade between China and Japan, while Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba called for calm.

China is Japan’s largest trading partner.

On Monday, Japan announced a $26 million deal to nationalize the disputed island chain, whose waters contain rich fishing grounds and potential oil reserves. Japanese officials said the move was meant to ensure that no one triggers a confrontation with China by developing the uninhabited islands.
 
China called Japan's purchase a violation of Chinese sovereignty, saying China does not recognize any Japanese ownership of the islands.  China urged Japan to revoke the purchase immediately.

Japan rejected China's demand, saying Tokyo will not reconsider a transaction involving what it considers to be sovereign Japanese territory.

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by: Anonymous
September 14, 2012 2:22 AM
Diaoyu island is belonging to china, we have the absolute sovereignty.


by: Josh from: Murica!
September 14, 2012 1:26 AM
Not China's at all. Sure, China found it first, but all they did was document it. Japan has been actively administering it since 1895, and it now jointly administers it with Taiwan.

China has been involved with maritime territorial disputes with the Philippines, Vietnam, and Japan this year alone. It seeks to claim all of the South China Sea as its sovereign territory, so that if you step into the water at a beach in the west coast of the Philippines, you would be in China's territory, if they had their way. What we have is a historically bullied country stepping into its own (China), now wanting to expand its empire as its role model (the States) did in the past. Its an angry imperial power that needs to be checked.


by: JILOUTIU from: CHINA
September 14, 2012 12:48 AM
The Japanese occupation of the Diaoyu Islands during World War II,As the defeated country, Japan should return Diaoyu Island,If you say that the Diaoyu Islands belong to Japan, so, therefore, France, Poland, also belongs to Germany, because they also occupied by Germany.

In Response

by: Ou from: Beijing
September 14, 2012 1:49 PM
This is incorrect. Japan has been administering the islands before WWII


by: pop from: ny
September 14, 2012 12:16 AM
Hong Kong SAR should close it door to china. Hong Kong should control old Hong Kong. Do you have a communist paper that you owned Hong Kong 1997 - 2012?


by: Joe from: Los Angeles
September 14, 2012 12:04 AM
It's ironic that what triggered this was Shintaro Ishihara announced a plan to buy the islands. Shintaro Ishihara is a Japanese Ahmadinejad - a Nanking denier and right-wing revisionist. China is still basically a dictatorship. Japan is supposedly a modern, civil, democracy. How is it that these right-wing Japanese groups can continuously go unchallenged in Japan? This is a fundamental flaw in Japan. The Diaoyu Islands rightfully belong to China, but the Japanese are too fearful of their own right wing extremist groups.


by: Bruce Riaomc from: Tempe
September 13, 2012 11:20 PM
Diaoyu island is a part of China, as I know, when I traveled to Japan 10 years ago. My Japanese friends told me Diaoyu island really belongs to China. Due to plents of fish and oil resource, the Japan government wants to occupy it. In addition, Japan lost the war II and most Japanese want to "try again" and win the next war. Thus, some Japanese in folks also warry about that the Japan government will voke the war III in near future. So, do you know what we should do if we don't want the War III to happen.


by: leanne
September 13, 2012 11:15 PM
diaoyu belongs to china.


by: Anonymous
September 13, 2012 10:48 PM
It is China's water!!!!


by: moo m from: usa
September 13, 2012 10:34 PM
There are no such thing as china's water around senkaku islands!


by: liu shen from: china
September 13, 2012 10:24 PM
6 vessles are not enough, if japs dare to conflict, we should send warships.

In Response

by: Ou from: Beijing
September 14, 2012 1:44 PM
You realize attacking Japanese would be met with US military action as per the Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security?

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