News / USA

Republican Candidates Decry Intervention in Debt Crises Abroad

Republican presidential candidates (L-R) Rick Santorum,  Michele Bachmann, Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney take part in the CNBC Republican presidential debate in Rochester, Michigan, November 9, 2011.
Republican presidential candidates (L-R) Rick Santorum, Michele Bachmann, Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney take part in the CNBC Republican presidential debate in Rochester, Michigan, November 9, 2011.

Wednesday night's Republican debate, at Oakland University in Michigan, focused on the economy.  Candidates largely agreed that the United States needed to cut spending and focus on domestic actions that they say could spur job growth and improve the economy.

The federal deficit and high unemployment are major issues of concern among U.S. voters, but the first question of the evening was about the global economy - namely, how the United States should respond to economic troubles abroad, such as those in Italy.

Georgia businessman Herman Cain told the debate audience on the CNBC television network that the United States needs to concentrate on issues at home if it wants to avoid the massive debt that is plaguing Italy.

"Focus on the domestic economy or we will fail," he said. "So, yes, focus on the domestic economy first."

Cain says there is not much that the United States can directly do for Europe's third largest economy because Italy's debt is simply too huge.

Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney said during the CNBC debate that Europe is able to take care of its own problems.  

"My view is no, no, no.  We do not need to step in to bail out banks either in Europe or banks here in the U.S. that may have Italian debt," he said.  

Romney did say that the United States should continue to play a role in global financial bodies such as the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.

Texas Congressman Ron Paul says the United States will most likely bail out Europe, which he said would "be a real tragedy."

Candidates, including former U.S. House speaker Newt Gingrich, Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann, Texas Governor Rick Perry and former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum, spoke of the need for job growth and greater competition in the marketplace.  They generally agree that the United States needs to overhaul regulations and tax codes, and reduce the size and scope of government.  They also spoke of their opposition to government bailouts of private industries.

Back on the international economic front, Romney took aim at China.  During the CNBC debate, Romney accused China of "playing by different rules."

"One, they're stealing intellectual property.  Number two, they're hacking into our computer systems, both government and corporate, and they're stealing by virtue of that, as well, from us.  And finally, they're manipulating their currency, and by doing so holding down the price of Chinese goods and making sure their products are artificially low priced," said Romney. "It's predatory pricing. It's killing jobs in America."

Romney says, if he is elected president, he will take the issue of currency manipulation to the World Trade Organization and also apply tariffs to Chinese goods.  

During the CNBC debate, former U.S. Ambassador to China Jon Huntsman characterized the Sino-American relationship  as troublesome, problematic and complicated.  

"You start a trade war if you start slapping tariffs randomly on Chinese products based upon currency manipulation," said Hunstman. "That's not a good idea."   

Overall, the candidates did not spar with one another, but, on occasion, took issue with moderators for asking questions about complex topics that had to be answered in 30 to 60 seconds.

It was businessman Cain's first debate since accusations of sexual harassment against him  surfaced. The audience booed when moderator Maria Bartiromo raised the subject and linked it to questions of character and judgment.  Cain again said the allegations were unfounded and that Americans deserved better than to be tried in the court of public opinion.  

A moment of the debate that is likely to stick out in viewers' minds came when candidate Perry proposed eliminating three government agencies, but found himself unable to recall the third agency he would cut.  During the course of the debate, he remembered that he would abolish the Department of Energy, along with the Departments of Commerce and Education.   

A Gallup poll conducted last week and released on the day of the debate says Republicans predict Romney is most likely to be the party's presidential nominee, with 45 percent of Republicans polled predicting his nomination.  In second place is Cain, with 13 percent.

You May Like

At Khmer Rouge Court, Long-Awaited Verdict Approaches

First phase of trial, which is coming to an end, has focused on forced exodus of Phnom Penh in 1975 - and now many are hopeful justice will be served More

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities More

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

Downing of Malaysian airliner, allegations of cross-border shelling move information war in war-torn country to a new level More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukrainei
X
Al Pessin
July 31, 2014 8:13 PM
The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video Information War Rages Alongside Real One in Ukraine

The downing of the Malaysian airliner two weeks ago, and allegations that Russians are shelling Ukrainian troops across the border, have moved the information war swirling around the Ukrainian conflict to a new level. VOA's Al Pessin reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video When Fighting Eases, Gazans Line Up at Bakeries

When there is a lull in the conflict in Gaza, residents who have been hunkered down in their apartments rush out to stock up on food and other necessities. Probably the most important destination is the local bakery. VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Gaza City.
Video

Video US-Funded Program Offers Honduran Children Alternative to Illegal Immigration

President Obama and Central American leaders recently agreed to come up with a plan to address poverty and crime in the region that is fueling the surge of young migrants trying to illegally enter the United States. VOA’s Brian Padden looks at one such program in Honduras - funded in part by the United States - which gives street kids not only food and safety but a chance for a better life without, crossing the border.
Video

Video 'Fab Lab' Igniting Revolution in Kenya

The University of Nairobi’s Science and Technology Park is banking on 3-D prototyping to spark a manufacturing revolution in the country. Lenny Ruvaga has more for from Nairobi's so-called “FabLab” for VOA.
Video

Video Gazans in Shelled School Sought Shelter

Israel's air and ground assault against Hamas-led fighters in Gaza has forced many Palestinians to flee their homes, seeking safety. But safe places are hard to find, as VOA’s Scott Bobb reports from Jabaliya.
Video

Video Rapid Spread of Ebola in West Africa Prompts Global Alert

Across West Africa, health officials are struggling to keep up with what the World Health Organization describes as the worst ebola outbreak on record. The virus has killed hundreds of people this year. U.S. President Barack Obama and other world leaders are watching the developments closely as they weigh what actions, if any, are needed to help contain the disease.
Video

Video Michelle Obama: Young Africans Need to Embrace Women's Rights

U.S. first lady Michelle Obama urged some of Africa's best and brightest to advocate for women's rights in their home countries. As VOA's Pam Dockins explains, Obama spoke to some 500 participants of the Young African Leaders Initiative, a six-week U.S.-based training and development program.
Video

Video Immigrant Influx on Texas Border Heats Up Political Debate

Immigrants from Central America continue to cross the U.S.-Mexico border in south Texas, seeking asylum in the United States, as officials grapple with ways to deal with the problem and provide shelter for thousands of minors among the illegal border crossers. As VOA's Greg Flakus reports from Houston, the issue is complicated by internal U.S. politics and U.S. relations with the troubled nations that immigrants are fleeing.
Video

Video Study: Latino Students Most Segregated in California

Even though legal school segregation ended in the United States 60 years ago, one study finds segregation still occurs in the U.S. based on income and race. The University of California Los Angeles Civil Rights Project finds that students in California are more segregated by race than ever before, especially Latinos. Elizabeth Lee reports for VOA from Los Angeles.

AppleAndroid