News / USA

Boston Marathoners Vow to Take Back Sacred Race

Boston Marathon Bombing Charity Run
Boston Marathon Bombing Charity Run
Reuters
“Left on Boylston” in this American city means only one thing on marathon day.
 
Boston Marathon - route of the race.Boston Marathon - route of the race.
x
Boston Marathon - route of the race.
Boston Marathon - route of the race.
It means you're in the home stretch of the Boston Marathon, and all of the early morning runs in the dark New England winters, and all the wild cheering from family and friends, and all your memories about Bill Rodgers, Joan Benoit Samuelson and Uta Pippig, are about to carry you across the finish line.
 
“I can't even imagine when I turn onto Boylston,” said Katie O'Donnell. “No doubt I will be crying. It's going to be incredibly emotional.”
 
Last year, O'Donnell, 38, a doctor at Boston Children's Hospital, didn't finish the race after completing more than 25 miles. There was no “left on Boylston” for O'Donnell and a throng of other marathoners.
 
Officials stopped the race after two pressure cooker bombs exploded near the finish line, killing three people and injuring more than 260.
 
“It was such a sucker punch,” O'Donnell said.
 
But on April 21, 36,000 runners, including O'Donnell, will be part of the second-largest field in the event's history, with the goal of taking back a race that New Englanders hold sacred.
 
David Chorney, 26, a law student at Suffolk University in downtown Boston, grew up in New Hampshire, just north of Massachusetts and remembers watching the race in study hall at  elementary school. He didn't plan to run a marathon this year, but after the bomb attacks he accelerated his training so he could qualify.
 
Chorney secured his spot with a time of 2 hours, 33 minutes at the Lehigh Valley Marathon last September, a half-hour faster than the race's strict standard for his age group. He expects to improve on his time at Boston, but a personal record isn't his guiding thought.
 
Boston Marathon - sites of bombings, 2013.Boston Marathon - sites of bombings, 2013.
x
Boston Marathon - sites of bombings, 2013.
Boston Marathon - sites of bombings, 2013.
“What happened last year was absolutely devastating,” Chorney said. “I'm looking forward to being part of the recovery and restoration of how we all traditionally think about the Boston Marathon.”
 
Along with tens of thousands of runners and hundreds of thousands of spectators, this year's event will feature an enhanced police presence. Some 3,500 law enforcement officers, double last year's numbers, will be posted along the 26.2 mile route and new restrictions will prohibit runners or spectators from carrying backpacks or other large parcels.
 
Fundraising is also expected to top last year's $21 million record. Participants who want the thrill of coasting down Boylston Street but aren't as fleet of foot as Chorney, earned a berth in the larger field by soliciting contributions for charities.
 
2014 Boston Marathon

 
  • 36,000 official entrants
  • 10,000 volunteers
  • 3,500 security personnel
  • 1,900 medical personnel
  • Generates an estimated $142 million for local economy

Source: BAA.org
That will give fans a wide range of athletes to cheer for - from elite East African competitors who will cover the course in just over two hours to the weekend warriors taking more than twice as long, buoyed by screaming students at Wellesley College and winded from climbing Heart Break Hill about 20 miles into the race.
 
It's a special day because it is also Patriots Day, a state holiday, and the Boston Red Sox play near the course at Fenway Park. There's plenty of race lore and local heroes, too.
 
Bill Rodgers, or “Boston Billy,” won the race four times; once he even stopped to tie his shoe several times. Maine's Joan Benoit Samuelson, an Olympic marathon champion and two-time Boston winner, ran the 2013 event in 2:50:29, the fastest ever by a woman in the 55-59 age group. She was not aware of her feat until a reporter told her at a post-race press conference.
 
“The most exciting aspect of the race was getting to run the same event and route that Frank Shorter and Bill Rodgers did before me,” said St. Louis resident Frank Reedy, who ran in 1998.
 
Jason Hartmann of Boulder, Colorado, showed up last year without a sponsor and was the top American finisher, placing fourth overall in the men's division. At the front of the pack, sporting knee-high white tube socks and with Kenya and Ethiopia's best on his heels, he gave the partisan crowd some early hope. No American man has won Boston since Greg Meyer in 1983.
 
“You have the amazing people who don't even look like they're sweating, and you have people like me - back of the pack,” O'Donnell said. “It's great how everyone cheers on the best of the best and those limping slowly to the finish line.”

You May Like

Taliban's New Leader Says Jihad Will Continue

Top US Afghan diplomat also meets with Pakistani, Afghan officials following news of Mullah Omar's death More

Video US Landmark Pushes Endangered Species

People gathered in streets, on rooftops in Manhattan to see image highlights that covered 33 floors of Empire State Building More

World’s Widest Suspension Bridge Being Built Over Bosphorus

Once built, Yavuz Sultan Selim Bridge will span 2 kilometers with about 1.5 kilometers over water, and will be longest suspension bridge in world carrying rail system More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Rory Reid from: Nevada
April 14, 2014 6:31 PM
Well, of course it was the CIA who orchestrated the Boston bombing. The Tsarnaev brothers (2 patsies) were on the CIA payroll MONTHS before the so-called "bombing" happened. The CIA has a LONG HISTORY of staging false flag attacks against its own people. Even the very liberal New York Times admits that!!!! WAKE UP AMERICA!!!

by: Mrs Janet Levy from: Boston
April 14, 2014 11:19 AM
The CIA must come clean, and be EXPOSED for what they did last year in Boston. Just follow the money trail, and it goes right back to the CIA!!! But it would be naive and irresponsible not to make note of these bizarre links, through their Uncle Ruslan Tsarni, of the Tsarnaev brothers to the CIA, and of the apparent presence of the Craft International personnel at the marathon finish line, not to mention the uncanny similarity in attire between Tamerlan Tsarnaev and the Craft mercenaries at the marathon bombing scene. (Besides, my late father, a retired electrical engineer and a Jungian analyst, used to say that many seeming coincidences are actually synchronicities, and can have much more meaning than simply being a highly improbable accident.) Also begging an answer is the question of where the two brothers, neither of whom had obvious access to wealth, got the money to spend on fancy clothes or, in the case of Tamerlan (who with his wife and small daughter, on the basis of his publicly available information, qualified until this year for welfare assistance), owned a late model Mercedes-Benz sedan.

These issues demand our attention because our increasingly national security obsessed government has been using each tragedy like this to further curtail our freedoms. We have to pay attention all the more because none of this is being investigated or even reported on at all by the corporate media, which seem content to just report on official statements and leaks and call it a day’s work well done.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Iraqi Yazidis Fear Death of Their Communityi
X
Sharon Behn
August 03, 2015 2:23 PM
A year ago on August 3, Islamic State militants stormed the homelands of Iraq’s Yazidi minority, killing hundreds of men and enslaving thousands of women. The scenes of desperate Yazidi families crowding on the top of Sinjar mountain without food or water spurred Kurdish fighters into action, an emergency airlift and the start of the U.S. airstrike campaign against the Islamic State Sunni extremists. VOA's Sharon Benh reports from northern Iraq.
Video

Video Iraqi Yazidis Fear Death of Their Community

A year ago on August 3, Islamic State militants stormed the homelands of Iraq’s Yazidi minority, killing hundreds of men and enslaving thousands of women. The scenes of desperate Yazidi families crowding on the top of Sinjar mountain without food or water spurred Kurdish fighters into action, an emergency airlift and the start of the U.S. airstrike campaign against the Islamic State Sunni extremists. VOA's Sharon Benh reports from northern Iraq.
Video

Video Bangkok Warned It Soon Could Be Submerged

Italy's Venice and America's New Orleans are not the only cities gradually submerging. The nearly ten million residents of the Bangkok urban area now must confront warnings the city could become uninhabitable in a few decades. VOA Correspondent Steve Herman reports from the Thai capital.
Video

Video Inclusive Gym Gets People With Disabilities in Fitness Spirit

Individuals with special needs are 58 percent more likely to be obese than the general population. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, they also have an increased likelihood of anxiety, depression and social isolation. But a sports club outside Washington wants to make a difference in these people's lives. With Carol Pearson narrating, VOA's June Soh reports.
Video

Video Astronauts Train Underwater for Deep Space Missions

Manned deep space missions are still a long way off, but space agencies are already testing procedures, equipment and human stamina for operations in extreme environment conditions. Small groups of astronauts take turns in spending days in an underwater lab, off Florida’s southern coast, simulating future missions to some remote world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Special Olympics Show Competitors' Skill, Determination

Special Olympics competitions will wrap up Saturday in Los Angeles, and the closing ceremony for athletes with intellectual disabilities will be held Sunday night. In a week of competition, athletes have shown what they can do through skill and determination. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan reports.
Video

Video Civil Rights Leaders Struggled to Achieve Voting Rights Act

Fifty years ago, lawmakers approved, and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson signed, the Voting Rights Act of 1965. The measure outlawed racial discrimination in voting, giving millions of blacks in many parts of the southern United States federal enforcement of the right to vote. Correspondent Chris Simkins introduces us to some civil rights leaders who were on the front lines in the struggle for voting rights.
Video

Video Shooter’s Grill: Serving Food with a Touch of the Second Amendment

Shooter's Grill, a restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, attracts visitors from all over the world as well as local patrons. The reason? Waitresses openly carry loaded firearms as they serve food, and customers are welcome to carry them, too. VOA's Enming Liu and Lin Yang paid a visit to Shooter's Grill, and heard different opinions about this unique establishment.
Video

Video Despite Controversy, Business Owner Continues Sale of Confederate Flags

At Cooter’s, a store in rural Sperryville, Virginia, about 120 kilometers west of Washington, D.C., Confederate flags are flying off the shelves. The red, white and blue battle flag, with 13 white stars representing the Confederate states, was carried by southern forces during the U.S. Civil War in the 1860s. The South had seceded from the Union over several key issues of disagreement, including slavery. VOA’s Deborah Block has the story.
Video

Video Booming London Property a ‘Haven for Dirty Money’

Billions of dollars of so-called ‘dirty money’ from the proceeds of crime - especially from Russia - are being laundered through the London property market, according to anti-corruption activists. As Henry Ridgwell reports from the British capital, the government has pledged to crack down on the practice.
Video

Video Hometown of Boy Scouts of America Founder Reacts to Gay Leader Decision

Ottawa, Illinois, is the hometown of W.D. Boyce, who founded the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. In Ottawa, where Scouting remains an important part of the legacy of the community, the end of the organization's ban on openly gay adult leaders was seen as inevitable. VOA's Kane Farabaugh reports.

VOA Blogs