News / Middle East

Iran's Supreme Leader Calls for More Nuclear Enrichment Capacity

FILE - Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
FILE - Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
Reuters

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said Iran would need to significantly increase its uranium enrichment capacity, highlighting a gap in positions between Tehran and world powers as they hold talks aimed at clinching a nuclear accord.

Iran and six major powers — the United States, Russia, France, Germany, China and Britain — have less than two weeks to bridge wide differences on the future scope of Iran's enrichment program and other issues if they are to meet a self-imposed July 20 deadline for a deal.

They resumed talks in Vienna last week and their negotiators continued meetings in the Austrian capital on Tuesday, but there was no immediate sign of any substantive progress.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said in Paris that none of the major outstanding issues had been agreed upon, and that the United States wanted foreign ministers to join the negotiations.

Iran's capacity to refine uranium lies at the center of the nuclear stalemate and is seen as the hardest issue to resolve.

Iran insists it needs to expand its capacity to refine uranium to fuel a planned network of atomic energy plants. The powers say Tehran must sharply reduce that capacity to prevent the country being able to quickly produce a nuclear bomb using uranium enriched to a far higher degree.

"Their aim is that we accept a capacity of 10,000 separative work units [SWUs], which is equivalent to 10,000 centrifuges of the older type that we already have. Our officials say we need 190,000 SWU. Perhaps this is not a need this year or in two years or five years, but this is the country's absolute need," Khamenei said in a statement published late on Monday.

An SWU is a measurement of the effort necessary for the separation of isotopes of uranium. Western experts say Iran's current centrifuges have a very low enrichment capacity compared with the most modern technology in the world. The Islamic Republic says it is developing new, more efficient models.

Iran says its program is for civilian purposes such as electricity generation and denies having any ambitions to build a nuclear weapon.

Ending the decade-long dispute with Iran is seen as central to defusing tensions and averting the danger of a major Middle East war.

A Western diplomat made clear the uphill task negotiations face if they are to hammer out an agreement: "We're still far from a deal... [However], the deadline is July 20 and that's what we're working towards."

Iran expert Ali Vaez of the International Crisis Group said the negotiations were now at a precarious stage. "This has once again turned into a contest of wills."

Hardliners

Last week, other Western diplomats said Iran had reduced demands for the size of its future nuclear enrichment program in the negotiations, although Western governments were urging Tehran to compromise further. They did not give details.

But Mark Fitzpatrick, director of the non-proliferation program at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) think-tank, said Khamenei's statement "confirms what I have suspected: that although Iranian negotiators have leeway on some issues, such as transparency and the time frame for lifting sanctions, they are not authorized to accept cutbacks to the enrichment program."

Iran now has more than 19,000 installed enrichment centrifuges, mostly old-generation IR-1 machines, with about 10,000 of them operating to increase the concentration of uranium's fissile isotope U-235.

Mohammad Ali Shabani, a Tehran-based political analyst, said Khamenei's statement was in line with what Iran's negotiators have been saying for months in Vienna.

"The open timeline, however, allows enough flexibility for the two sides to come to consensus," he said.

In defiance of Western pressure, Iran has expanded centrifuge numbers sharply over the last decade until it stopped doing that under a Nov. 24 interim deal agreed with world powers in exchange for limited sanctions relief.

Iran wants an end to sanctions, which have stifled its economy and hindered oil exports. But Khamenei, ultimate arbiter on all major decisions in Iran, said the country "should plan for the future, supposing the enemy won't ease on sanctions."

Khamenei said the idea of shutting down the underground Fordow enrichment plant was "laughable," his website said.

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 09, 2014 1:07 PM
Yeah, more humiliation, isn't it? When USA surreptitiously removed the agenda of aggression on the table and continued to vow that all options were still there, Khamenei was only giggling at it all. Now he comes with the joker, an ace up his sleeve, and the gangling yuppy president will dance to the podium and once again address the Americans. What will he say after July 20 when the Iranians end up rubbishing the IAEA (and/or P5+1) deal? Someone wants to be popular for pulling America out of war zones, closing facilities used to incarcerate terrorists, bulk from wars in Syria, Iraq as they bomb and kill diplomats in Libya, while flexing muscle to go into nuclear war with USSR over Ukraine, the bandwagon way, think Americans are enjoying the naivety of it all. Now, if a no-war policy has dropped the popularity of the president, and the healthcare project does not become a hit as it was proposed to be, what follows next? The failure of this negotiation will surely do more blow to the president's rating.

"Iran must not be allowed to produce a nuclear weapon". This has been the policy of USA; will one man's desire to have one of his own (islamist country) listed among the nuclear powers in the world becloud USA's policy aimed at preventing a nuclear terrorism from joining the current terrorist attrition aimed at USA? Let us fully understand that failure to reach a compromise by target date 20 July 2014 will set the stage for nuclear arms proliferation. It is at the same time, directly or indirectly, setting the stage for the dreaded military option - whether it remains on USA's negotiation table or not. For there are people to whom Iran's nuclear capability simply translates to existential threat. To ignore it is to accept another holocaust, a death warrant, a suicide! While six nations have been involved in the negotiations with Iran, one country stands out as the pivotal, and the success or failure of it will be attributable to the one country that should take the lead in these matters but has become a laugh to those who know better since the leader does not know his way.


by: 1worldnow from: Earth
July 09, 2014 2:00 AM
They will have a nuke soon, no doubt. If only Obama can stop talking, and talking, and talking, and selfies, and more talking....and just a few more selfies........and check the popularity polls (to see if he is still the cool prez).....maybe he can see that this is serious..........FOR THE ENTIRE WORLD!!!!!

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