News / Arts & Entertainment

Music Takes on Different Guises at Sundance

A scene from "Whiplash" (Courtesy Sundance/Daniel McFadden)
A scene from "Whiplash" (Courtesy Sundance/Daniel McFadden)
TEXT SIZE - +
Reuters
— Since the early days of film, music has gone hand in hand with movies, but a new crop of filmmakers is using music to explore existential themes of humanity that are being showcased at the annual Sundance Film Festival.
 
“Whiplash,” a contender in the U.S. dramatic competition, that kicked off Sundance last week and is the first of numerous films that use music as a tool to explore human identity at the festival, held in the Utah ski resort of Park City.
 
The film, directed by Damien Chazelle, stars rising star Miles Teller as a drummer who enters music school and comes face to face with a teacher who challenges him to pursue perfection, pushing him to the limit.
 
“It is such a singular film,” said Trevor Groth, Sundance's director of programming. “It really is one of the potential breakouts of the festival because it's so unique.”
 
“Whiplash” will compete against “Low Down,” a coming-of-age tale following a young girl growing up with a troubled musician father, and “Song One,” in which a young woman seeks out a musician to help her younger brother come out of a coma.
 
“I was really fascinated by the idea of music's connective power, and how it can connect people in unpredictable ways without them even knowing it,” Kate Barker-Frayland, the director of “Song One,” said.
 
Anne Hathaway and Johnny Flynn in a scene from "Song One" (Courtesy Sundance/John Guleserian)Anne Hathaway and Johnny Flynn in a scene from "Song One" (Courtesy Sundance/John Guleserian)
x
Anne Hathaway and Johnny Flynn in a scene from "Song One" (Courtesy Sundance/John Guleserian)
Anne Hathaway and Johnny Flynn in a scene from "Song One" (Courtesy Sundance/John Guleserian)
The romantic drama, starring Oscar-winner Anne Hathaway and Johnny Flynn, brings together two people both at low points in their lives. Barker-Frayland said she wanted to cast their story against the backdrop of Brooklyn's vibrant music scene.
 
“I wanted to shoot all of the performances live and record the music live to really capture what it's like to go watch a show at all these different places. Music is such an emotional thing and any song has some emotional content,” she said.
 
Music in Different Guises

Now in its 30th year, Sundance is the top independent film gathering in the United States and has helped launch the careers of many up-and-coming filmmakers, including Quentin Tarantino, Steven Soderbergh and David O. Russell.
 
The festival, backed by Robert Redford's Sundance Institute, is held in the snow-covered streets of Park City from Jan. 16-26.
 
Sundance has also ushered some strong music films into the awards race in recent years, with 2012's “Searching for Sugar Man” winning the best documentary feature Oscar the following year, and 2013's “20 Feet from Stardom,” which has been nominated for an Oscar in the Documentary Feature category.

This year, music spans all categories at Sundance, including competition, premieres and spotlight films, and takes many different guises, such as a musical, a coping mechanism and a tool for healing.
 
In “God Help the Girl,” a contender in the world cinema dramatic category, Scottish musician Stuart Murdoch, from indie-pop band Belle & Sebastian, explores a coming-of-age tale with a musical. In the spotlight category, “Only Lovers Left Alive,” starring Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston, follows a dejected musician who finds solace in his lover as his world collapses.
 
“I'm curious as to how music is of such interest to our filmmakers,” said John Cooper, director of the film festival. “It could be tied to their passions being very similar, but each film is so unique in the approach that they've taken, it's almost as if there's no similarities except for the music.”
 
A scene from "Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory." (Courtesy Sundance/Eyeball NYC)A scene from "Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory." (Courtesy Sundance/Eyeball NYC)
x
A scene from "Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory." (Courtesy Sundance/Eyeball NYC)
A scene from "Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory." (Courtesy Sundance/Eyeball NYC)
​“Alive Inside: A Story of Music & Memory,” a contender in the U.S. documentary competition, explores the healing power of music as one man crusades to have music in nursing homes to help those with Alzheimer's disease.
 
The festival's closing night film, “Rudderless,” directed by actor William H. Macy, sees a father cope with the grief of losing his son by forming a rock and roll band to perform his late son's original music.
 
“It's definitely going to be a celebration of music at the festival,” said Cooper.

You May Like

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

Turkish Law Gives Spy Agency Controversial Powers

Parliament approves legislation to bolster powers of intelligence service, which government claims is necessary to modernize and deal with new threats Turkey faces More

Video Face of American Farmer Changing

Average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population More

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Face of American Farmer is Changingi
X
Mike Osborne
April 18, 2014
The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid

New in Music Alley

Beyond Category

Saxophonist Craig Handy has an exciting new band called 2nd Line Smith, which combines the organ-jazz repertoire of Jimmy Smith with the “second line” rhythms of New Orleans parade music. Craig Handy joins "Beyond Category" host Eric Felten at Washington’s Bohemian Caverns jazz club to talk about the music and perform with the band.

Blogs