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Philip Seymour Hoffman Dies of Apparent Drug Overdose

Philip Seymour Hoffman Dead at 46i
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February 03, 2014 12:05 PM
One of the leading actors of his time - Philip Seymour Hoffman is found dead at his New York City apartment at age 46 of an apparent drug overdose.

video clip of Philip Seymour Hoffman, dead at 46

VOA News
Academy Award winning American actor Philip Seymour Hoffman was found dead Sunday in his New York apartment of a suspected drug overdose. He was 46 years old.

Police say they went to the actor's home in Manhattan's Greenwich Village after receiving a call from one of his friends. The Associated Press and The New York Times, citing law enforcement officials, said investigators found a syringe in Hoffman's arm and an envelope containing what was believed to be heroin. There was no official confirmation of the reports.

Hoffman spoke candidly over the years about past struggles with drug addiction. After 23 years of being sober, he acknowledged in interviews last year that he had relapsed and developed a heroin problem that led to a stint at a rehabilitation facility.

A native of New York state, Hoffman won an Academy Award and a Golden Globe for Best Actor for his role in the 2005 biographical film Capote, in which he played author Truman Capote. He also received three Academy Award nominations as best supporting actor. And he won Tony Award nominations for his acting on the Broadway stage.

  • Philip Seymour Hoffman arrives for the world premiere of the film "Moneyball" in Oakland, California, Sept. 19, 2011.
  • A portrait and flowers in memory of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman is displayed outside Philip Marie Restaurant and bar on Hudson Street in Manhattan, New York, Feb. 2, 2014.
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman seen at Lionsgate's 'The Hunger Games: Catching Fire' Los Angeles Premiere, Nov, 18, 2013.
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman, best supporting actor nominee for "Charlie Wilson's War", arrives with his girlfriend Mimi O'Donnell at the 80th annual Academy Awards, the Oscars, Feb. 24, 2008.
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman poses with his award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture-Drama for "Capote" at the 63rd Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Jan. 16, 2006.

Last month, Hoffman appeared at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah for the premiere of the thriller A Most Wanted Man.
 
He spoke to Reuters about playing Gunther Bachmann - a German spy.
 
Philip Seymour Hoffman, said, "I connected a lot of it, you know, I think it would be hard for anyone not to kind of connect with the loneliness, he is pretty lonely, he's a very driven, obsessive guy, you know, he's not unforgiving, of himself in a lot of ways, and there's a lot of people carry in one way or another."
 
Hoffman is survived by his partner of 15 years, costume designer Mimi O'Donnell, and their three children.

Some information for this report provided by Reuters.
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by: Malcolm kyle from: San Antonio
February 04, 2014 6:08 AM
Prohibition: America's silent assassin.

Prohibition isn't like a disease where we're still waiting for the cure to be discovered—we know the cure for this right now. This isn't like putting a man on the moon or inventing the Internet. It doesn't take some stroke of genius or feat of technology. We have everything we need right now to end this moronothon. Rarely in the history of mankind have we encountered a problem of such magnitude and consequence that is so eminently solvable.

We are actually experiencing a de facto civl war between the majority (those who embrace reason and function in the real world of cause and effect) and the prohibitionists, who, numbed by their isolation and despair, are seeking meaning in a mythical world that can never, ever, be reality-based. A world of deceit and lies, of blood and corpses—a world of complete social and economic collapse.

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