News / Asia

    Rodman Apologizes for Rant, Heads to N. Korean Ski Resort

    FILE - Former NBA basketball player Dennis Rodman talks to the media at the Beijing International Airport.
    FILE - Former NBA basketball player Dennis Rodman talks to the media at the Beijing International Airport.
    Reuters
    Retired U.S. basketball star Dennis Rodman visited a North Korean ski resort on Thursday with dictator Kim Jong Un as a statement was issued on the former player's behalf apologizing for comments he made about an American jailed by Pyongyang.
     
    A source with direct knowledge of Rodman's itinerary said the 52-year-old took a helicopter to a new multimillion dollar resort which is one of Kim's showcase projects and which has been condemned as a waste of money in a country where most people are malnourished.
     
    The source declined to be identified due to the sensitivity of the issue.
     
    Rodman's visit to North Korea, his fourth, has drawn criticism from human rights activists and the family of imprisoned U.S. missionary Kenneth Bae after Rodman appeared to suggest in an interview peppered with obscenities that Bae, rather than the North Korean authorities, was responsible for his incarceration.
     
    Rodman's public relations firm issued a statement attributed to the retired player apologizing for the comments and saying that he had been drinking on a stressful day.
     
    It was not possible to verify with the company whether Rodman had seen the statement as it did not reply to email or telephone inquiries.
     
    “I want to apologize, I take full responsibility,” Rodman was quoted by CNN as saying in the statement. “I embarrassed a lot of people. I'm very sorry. At this point I should know better than to make political statements. I'm truly sorry.”
     
    Bae's sister, Terri Chung, has said her family was outraged by Rodman's comments and that he should use his access to the North Korean leader to advocate on Bae's behalf, rather than “hurl outrageous accusations”.
     
    “He is playing games with my brother's life,” Chung said in a statement.
     
    Kenneth Bae being interviewed by Japanese pro-North Korea newspaper Choson Sinbo at North Korean labor camp, June 26, 2013.Kenneth Bae being interviewed by Japanese pro-North Korea newspaper Choson Sinbo at North Korean labor camp, June 26, 2013.
    x
    Kenneth Bae being interviewed by Japanese pro-North Korea newspaper Choson Sinbo at North Korean labor camp, June 26, 2013.
    Kenneth Bae being interviewed by Japanese pro-North Korea newspaper Choson Sinbo at North Korean labor camp, June 26, 2013.
    Bae, 45, was sentenced to 15 years hard labor for state subversion in North Korea, where he was detained in 2012 while  leading a tour group. The Supreme Court said he used his tourism business to form groups aimed at overthrowing the government.
     
    On Wednesday, Rodman led a chorus  singing “Happy Birthday” to the leader of the isolated and heavily sanctioned country at a basketball match that Kim attended with his wife.

    Related video clip: Dennis Rodman Sings "Happy Birthday" to Kim Jong Un
     
    Rodman Sings Happy Birthday to N. Korea's Kim Jong Uni
    X
    January 08, 2014 2:57 PM
    Retired U.S. basketball star Dennis Rodman led North Koreans in singing "Happy Birthday" to the country's leader, Kim Jong Un, before a planned basketball game Wednesday in Pyongyang.

    North Korean state media said the song was “reflecting [Rodman's] reverence” for Kim Jong Un, and that he had organized the game as a gift for his birthday, confirming for the first time the leader's date of birth. He is believed to be 31.
     
    The Rodong Sinmun, the official newspaper of North Korea's ruling Workers' Party, dedicated its front page to coverage of the basketball game and published photos of Kim sitting and laughing with Rodman.
     
    “Dennis Rodman said he was overjoyed and teared up when he met the Dear Respected Marshal again,” the newspaper said.
     
    Starved, beaten, amused
     
    The fading basketball star's trips had been financed by Irish bookmaker Paddy Power, although it has now withdrawn its funding.
     
    It is not known whether Rodman has the capacity to fund another trip. North Korea rarely pays for this kind of visit, according to experts on the country.
     
    Rodman has described Kim, who has been in power for just over two years as his “friend.”
     
    Kim has presided over two long range rocket launches - banned under U.N. sanctions due to Pyongyang's nuclear weapons and proliferation efforts - a nuclear test and last year threatened to attack South Korea, Japan and the United States.
     
    People watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Dec. 9, 2013.People watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Dec. 9, 2013.
    x
    People watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Dec. 9, 2013.
    People watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Dec. 9, 2013.
    Last month, his uncle, Jang Song Thaek, was executed in one of the biggest and most public purges undertaken in North Korea, which has been ruled by the same family for three generations.
     
    Jang is just one of hundreds of thousands North Koreans who have faced death or imprisonment in the North. An estimated 150,000-200,000 people are in political prisons and forced labor camps, according to rights activists.
     
    Defectors have testified to summary executions and rampant human rights abuses on North Korea. They say they were starved, beaten and abused in work camps where many die and that babies born in the camps were killed.
     
    While North Koreans suffer from food shortages and malnutrition, according to U.N. assessments, Kim has pushed ahead with big building projects such as the Masik Ski Resort that Rodman visited.
     
    South Korean officials estimate it cost hundreds of millions of dollars to build and North Korea aims to make $43.75 million in annual profit from the resort, according to documents prepared for potential foreign investors. It expects up to 5,000 skiers to visit per day.
     
    Pictures released at the resort opening late last year showed just one chair lift and an assortment of snow equipment that appeared to have been imported despite a U.N. ban on the export of “luxury” goods to the North.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: August West from: Earth
    January 13, 2014 4:42 AM
    Its kinda BS that Rodman is getting grief and the blame for Bae's imprisonment now. He is not a US Diplomat or US Government Official. He is there as representative in the name of sport and basketball. Not prison negotiations and politics. Rodman just got sick of everyone asking and pestering him about it. He may have made things worse for Bae if he got involved. When the Olympics were in Germany during Hitlers reign were the athletes expected to negotiate with Hitler to quit killing all the Jews?

    by: Justin from: United States
    January 09, 2014 11:05 PM
    I'm so excited about the ski resort. I'm definitely going to ski there. What a great way to help the so called impoverished country than by sending tourist dollars their way.

    by: Jerry Frey from: USA+
    January 09, 2014 12:01 PM
    "In the North’s version of events, however, there was neither a draw nor a North Korean invasion. North Korean textbooks say the war — known as the Fatherland Liberation War — was started by “U.S. imperialists” who wanted to dominate Asia."

    Rodman has always been a cartoon; now he's just a fool and a propaganda tool....http://napoleonlive.info/see-the-evidence/facts-about-north-korea-2/"

    by: blah from: blan
    January 09, 2014 9:33 AM
    Rodong Sinmun - North Korean for 'Rodman is my son"

    by: Stephen Real
    January 09, 2014 9:21 AM
    as long as the angry people don't mess things up
    the only asset the US has in North Korea is Dennis Rodman.
    but then again...many people misunderstand all that they see
    which is to the USA's advantage.

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