News / Health

WHO: Malaria Control Efforts Saved 3.3 Million Since 2000

FILE - A Sudanese women gets help setting up a bed net.
FILE - A Sudanese women gets help setting up a bed net.
Reuters
Global efforts to curb malaria have saved the lives of 3.3 million people since 2000, cutting global death rates from the mosquito-borne disease by 45 percent and by half in children under five, the World Health Organization said on Wednesday.
 
WHO said in its World Malaria Report 2013 that expanded prevention and control measures helped produce declines in malaria deaths and illness. Of the 3.3 million lives saved, most were in the 10 countries with the highest malaria burden and among children under age five, the group most afflicted by the disease.
 
“Investments in malaria control, mostly since 2007, have paid off tremendously,” said Ray Chambers, the United Nations secretary-general's special envoy for malaria.
 
According to the WHO report, child deaths fell to fewer than 500,000 in 2012.
 
Overall, there were an estimated 207 million cases of malaria in 2012, which caused some 627,000 deaths, according to the report, which includes information from 102 countries with malaria transmission. That compared with an estimated 219 million cases and 660,000 deaths in 2010, the most recent year for which numbers are available.
 
“This remarkable progress is no cause for complacency: absolute numbers of malaria cases and deaths are not going down as fast as they could,” WHO Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan  said in a statement accompanying release of the report. “The fact that so many people are infected and dying from mosquito bites is one of the greatest tragedies of the 21st century.”
 
Malaria is endemic in more than 100 countries worldwide but can be prevented by the use of bed nets and indoor spraying to keep the mosquitoes that carry the disease at bay. The mosquito-borne parasitic disease kills hundreds of thousands of people a year, mainly babies in the poorest parts of sub-Saharan Africa.
 
An estimated 3.4 billion people continue to be at risk for malaria, mostly in southeast Asia and in Africa where around 80 percent of cases occur.
 
Chambers said progress against malaria has been threatened by funding cuts in 2011-2012, which translated into a flattening in the curve of the decline. The WHO report noted significant drops in delivery of insecticide-treated bed nets in its 2013 report.
 
But that could begin to ease. Last month, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, UNICEF, the U.K.'s Department for International Development and the U.S. President's Malaria Initiative agreed to provide over 200 million nets in the next 12 to 18 months, which will replace 120 million existing bed nets and provide 80 million new ones.
 
WHO also continues to track emerging parasite resistance to artemisinin, the core component of malaria drugs known as artemisinin-based combination therapies, or ACTs, and mosquito resistance to insecticides. Four countries in southeast Asia reported artemisinin resistance in 2013, and 64 countries found evidence of insecticide resistance, suggesting recent gains against malaria “are still fragile,” Dr Robert Newman, director of the WHO Global Malaria Program, said in a statement.

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by: Cranksy from: USA
December 11, 2013 1:53 PM
I wish the names of the persons named in this article were as well known as the famous Miley Cyrus.

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