News / Middle East

Russia Says Missile System for Syria Will Deter Foreign Attacks

Russian S-300 anti-aircraft missile system is on display in an undisclosed location in Russia (file photo)
Russian S-300 anti-aircraft missile system is on display in an undisclosed location in Russia (file photo)
VOA News
A senior Russian diplomat says Moscow plans to provide advanced air defenses to Damascus to deter foreign military action against Syria's pro-Russian government, which is embroiled in a civil war.
 
Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said Tuesday the planned transfer of S-300 anti-aircraft missiles to the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad will be a "stabilizing factor" for the country. 
 
Russia's S-300 Missiles

  • Surface-to-air anti-aircraft missile
  • Vertical launch, short deployment time
  • Range up to 150 kilometers
  • 7.5 meters long
  • Developed in the1960s, 1970s by the then-Soviet Union
  • Several variants are manufactured
He told reporters that Moscow believes the sale will deter what he called "some hotheads" from considering options to send foreign forces to intervene in the Syrian conflict. 
 
But Ryabkov gave no indication of when Russia will transfer the air defense system. Damascus signed a contract to buy it several years ago. 
 
Israel and the United States have urged Russia not to proceed with the sale, fearing the air defense system will threaten Israeli security and complicate any military action they may take in Syria.

Watch related video by Henry Ridgwell:

Arms Debate Heats Up as Syria War Widensi
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May 28, 2013 8:08 PM
Amid widening Lebanese involvement in fighting in Syria - witnessed in the battle for the western Syrian town of Qusair -- Russia confirmed Tuesday that it will sell advanced anti-aircraft missiles to the Syrian government. It comes a day after the EU voted to allow the supply of weapons to the Syrian opposition. Henry Ridgwell reports for VOA from London.
Israel's warning
 
Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon toughened that message on Tuesday, warning of possible retaliation if the Russian missile technology is transferred. 
 
"Obviously from our perspective it is a threat at this stage," he said. "I cannot affirm that things have been expedited. The shipments are not on their way yet, this I can say. I hope they will not leave and if, God forbid, they reach Syria, we will know what to do."
 
Western sources said Israel carried out several air strikes in Syria earlier this month, apparently to stop the Syrian government from transferring sophisticated weapons to the pro-Assad Lebanese militant group Hezbollah. Israel has neither confirmed nor denied responsibility for the strikes. 
 
The Russian deputy foreign minister also criticized an EU decision to lift its arms embargo on the main opposition Syrian National Coalition while maintaining sanctions against the Syrian government. 
 
Ryabkov accused the 27-nation bloc of "pouring more fuel on the fire" of Syria's civil war and "damaging" prospects for a U.S. and Russian-proposed peace conference to resolve the two-year conflict. 
 
EU action
 
EU Arms Embargo for Syria

  • No longer forbids supplying arms to Syria's opposition forces
  • No immediate arms shipments are planned
  • Safeguards would ensure supplies are for protection of civilians
  • Arms embargo was part of package of sanctions imposed in 2011
  • EU plans further sanctions on President Bashar al-Assad's government
The EU decided to lift the embargo on Syrian rebels at a meeting in Brussels on Monday. But, EU officials gave mixed messages about when such weapons transfers might begin. 
 
Some officials said all EU members agreed to delay any arming of the rebels until August 1 to allow the U.S.-Russian peace initiative to proceed.
 
But British Foreign Secretary William Hague said Tuesday there is no requirement to wait until August to send weapons, although he reiterated that London has no immediate plans to do so. 
 
Syrian National Coalition spokesman Louay Safi told the French news agency that the EU move is a "positive step" but may be "too little, too late."
 
In separate remarks to the news agency, a spokesman for the SNC-backed Free Syrian Army criticized the EU, saying that delaying any arms transfers by two months would leave the Syrian people vulnerable to continued "genocide" by the Assad government. 
 
Opposition in bind
 
A boy walks on the rubble of buildings damaged by what activists said were missiles fired by Syrian Air Force fighter jets loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in Salqin city, Idlib governate, May 28, 2013.A boy walks on the rubble of buildings damaged by what activists said were missiles fired by Syrian Air Force fighter jets loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in Salqin city, Idlib governate, May 28, 2013.
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A boy walks on the rubble of buildings damaged by what activists said were missiles fired by Syrian Air Force fighter jets loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in Salqin city, Idlib governate, May 28, 2013.
A boy walks on the rubble of buildings damaged by what activists said were missiles fired by Syrian Air Force fighter jets loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in Salqin city, Idlib governate, May 28, 2013.
Some analysts believe recent events may force the opposition’s hand.  
 
At the IHS Jane’s security firm, analyst David Hartwell said Assad has been strengthened in recent weeks by the Russian missiles, other weapons from Iran, support from Lebanon's Hezbollah and recent battlefield gains.
 
“All of these factors appear to be coalescing at this moment in time to give him, or certainly give the appearance, that he can think about long-term survival,” he said.
 
Hartwell said confidence is up within the Assad regime, and it could press for more military advances in the coming days, including a possible assault on the country’s largest city, Aleppo.  
 
Syria-watcher Chris Doyle of the Council for Arab-British Understanding said that Assad is in a strong enough position that he might survive politically, at least during a transition period.
 
“I think that cannot be ruled out, as distasteful as that is, given his record," he said. "If it is symbolic, then maybe that is something that people will have to agree to, while holding their noses.”
 
Lebanon spillover
 
Meanwhile, there were more signs of Syria's conflict spilling over into Lebanon with deadly results.
 
Lebanese security sources said several rockets fired from Syria struck the northeastern Lebanese town of Hermel near the border on Tuesday, killing a woman and wounding several other people. Hermel's Shi'ite population supports Hezbollah militants who have crossed into Syria to fight alongside Assad's troops. 
 
Lebanese authorities said unknown gunmen also killed three Lebanese soldiers manning a checkpoint near the northeastern village of Arsal before dawn Tuesday.
 
Lebanese Sunnis have used border villages such as Arsal to send weapons and fighters into Syria to help the country's predominantly Sunni rebels fight the Assad government.
 
VOA's Al Pessin contributed to this report from London and Michael Lipin from Washington.

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Comment Sorting
Comments page of 2
 Previous    
by: Anonymous
May 28, 2013 12:08 PM
if Israel is smart they will go in and disable now while they can. Fact of the matter is the Syrian people will win this war regardless and it just takes a longer time. all the more reason for Israel to do it now to not only save thousands of lives but end this terrible burden that both Russia and Syria has created.

Russia is the biggest reason all of this is happening. If Russia wasn't backing bashar he would have been taken out already and wouldn't be so brazen to inflict error on his own people. Bashar must be hanged for crimes against the syrian nation. Russia needs its hand slapped hard now, because of the actions of putin.the world should boycott Russia for supporting the killing of thousands of innocent civilians in syria.

by: Anonymous
May 28, 2013 11:59 AM
so it appears that the Russia has decided to support a criminal responsible for the murder of tens of thousands of people. if Russia wants to make stupid mistakes for its future then that's its problem. what the Russian government has done now is just shown the people of Russia more of a reason why putin is a criminal and they should over throw their gov too soon.

by: Zane
May 28, 2013 11:48 AM
In this modern day and age, it is abundantly clear Russia is not interested in ensuring stability in the region. The introduction of these missiles is similar to the Cuban crisis all those years ago.
All that has changed are the Countries and their locations and
who is behind it again ? no second guesses
In Response

by: Anonymous
May 28, 2013 10:07 PM
I totally disagree with Ahmed Shah, most Syrians on the ground would welcome intervention from Israel, anything to take down Bashar. Bashar is the biggest threat to Syrian civilization right now,and should be labeled a Terrorist for killing and terrorizing more civilians than anyone else in Syria. Syrians would be dancing if Israel took out Bashar, they welcome help from anywhere. Israel has stayed out of this as much as it can, and hasn't done anywhere near the damage the Russians have done to Syria.
In Response

by: Ahmed Shah from: USA
May 28, 2013 6:27 PM
yeah right, Israel has been the cause of problems, strife and conflict, and now you sit here and blame Russia? Why dont you stop arming Israel to the hilt first?

Israel is the troublemaker not Syria.
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